How to buy cheap viagra

Patients Figure how to buy cheap viagra 1 is viagra funded by government. Figure 1. Enrollment and how to buy cheap viagra Randomization.

Of the 1107 patients who were assessed for eligibility, 1063 underwent randomization. 541 were assigned how to buy cheap viagra to the remdesivir group and 522 to the placebo group (Figure 1). Of those assigned to receive remdesivir, 531 patients (98.2%) received the treatment as assigned.

Forty-nine patients had remdesivir treatment discontinued before day 10 because of an adverse event or a serious adverse event other than death (36 patients) or because the how to buy cheap viagra patient withdrew consent (13). Of those assigned to receive placebo, 518 patients (99.2%) received placebo as assigned. Fifty-three patients discontinued placebo before day 10 because of an adverse event or a serious adverse event other than death (36 patients), because the patient withdrew consent how to buy cheap viagra (15), or because the patient was found to be ineligible for trial enrollment (2).

As of April 28, 2020, a total of 391 patients in the remdesivir group and 340 in the placebo group had completed the trial through day 29, recovered, or died. Eight patients who received remdesivir and 9 who received placebo how to buy cheap viagra terminated their participation in the trial before day 29. There were 132 patients in the remdesivir group and 169 in the placebo group who had not recovered and had not completed the day 29 follow-up visit.

The analysis population included 1059 patients for whom we have at least some postbaseline data available (538 in the remdesivir group and 521 in the placebo how to buy cheap viagra group). Four of the 1063 patients were not included in the primary analysis because no postbaseline data were available at the time of the database freeze. Table 1 how to buy cheap viagra.

Table 1. Demographic and Clinical Characteristics how to buy cheap viagra at Baseline. The mean age of patients was 58.9 years, and 64.3% were male (Table 1).

On the basis of the evolving epidemiology of erectile dysfunction treatment during the trial, 79.8% of patients were enrolled at sites in North how to buy cheap viagra America, 15.3% in Europe, and 4.9% in Asia (Table S1). Overall, 53.2% of the patients were white, 20.6% were black, 12.6% were Asian, and 13.6% were designated as other or not reported. 249 (23.4%) how to buy cheap viagra were Hispanic or Latino.

Most patients had either one (27.0%) or two or more (52.1%) of the prespecified coexisting conditions at enrollment, most commonly hypertension (49.6%), obesity (37.0%), and type 2 diabetes mellitus (29.7%). The median number of days between symptom onset and randomization was how to buy cheap viagra 9 (interquartile range, 6 to 12). Nine hundred forty-three (88.7%) patients had severe disease at enrollment as defined in the Supplementary Appendix.

272 (25.6%) patients met category 7 criteria on the ordinal scale, how to buy cheap viagra 197 (18.5%) category 6, 421 (39.6%) category 5, and 127 (11.9%) category 4. There were 46 (4.3%) patients who had missing ordinal scale data at enrollment. No substantial imbalances in baseline characteristics were observed between the remdesivir group and the placebo group.

Primary Outcome how to buy cheap viagra Figure 2. Figure 2. Kaplan–Meier Estimates how to buy cheap viagra of Cumulative Recoveries.

Cumulative recovery estimates are shown in the overall population (Panel A), in patients with a baseline score of 4 on the ordinal scale (not receiving oxygen. Panel B), in those how to buy cheap viagra with a baseline score of 5 (receiving oxygen. Panel C), in those with a baseline score of 6 (receiving high-flow oxygen or noninvasive mechanical ventilation.

Panel D), and in how to buy cheap viagra those with a baseline score of 7 (receiving mechanical ventilation or ECMO. Panel E). Table 2 how to buy cheap viagra.

Table 2. Outcomes Overall and According how to buy cheap viagra to Score on the Ordinal Scale in the Intention-to-Treat Population. Figure 3.

Figure 3 how to buy cheap viagra. Time to Recovery According to Subgroup. The widths of the confidence intervals have not been adjusted for multiplicity and how to buy cheap viagra therefore cannot be used to infer treatment effects.

Race and ethnic group were reported by the patients. Patients in how to buy cheap viagra the remdesivir group had a shorter time to recovery than patients in the placebo group (median, 11 days, as compared with 15 days. Rate ratio for recovery, 1.32.

95% confidence how to buy cheap viagra interval [CI], 1.12 to 1.55. P<0.001. 1059 patients (Figure 2 and Table how to buy cheap viagra 2).

Among patients with a baseline ordinal score of 5 (421 patients), the rate ratio for recovery was 1.47 (95% CI, 1.17 to 1.84). Among patients with a baseline score of 4 (127 patients) and those with a baseline score of 6 (197 patients), the rate ratio estimates for recovery were 1.38 (95% CI, 0.94 how to buy cheap viagra to 2.03) and 1.20 (95% CI, 0.79 to 1.81), respectively. For those receiving mechanical ventilation or ECMO at enrollment (baseline ordinal scores of 7.

272 patients), the how to buy cheap viagra rate ratio for recovery was 0.95 (95% CI, 0.64 to 1.42). A test of interaction of treatment with baseline score on the ordinal scale was not significant. An analysis adjusting for baseline ordinal score as a stratification variable was conducted to evaluate the overall effect (of the percentage of patients in each ordinal score category at baseline) on the primary outcome.

This adjusted analysis produced a similar treatment-effect estimate (rate ratio for recovery, how to buy cheap viagra 1.31. 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.54. 1017 patients) how to buy cheap viagra.

Table S2 in the Supplementary Appendix shows results according to the baseline severity stratum of mild-to-moderate as compared with severe. Patients who underwent randomization during the first 10 days after the onset of symptoms had a rate ratio for recovery of 1.28 how to buy cheap viagra (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.57. 664 patients), whereas patients who underwent randomization more than 10 days after the onset of symptoms had a rate ratio for recovery of 1.38 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.81.

380 patients) (Figure 3) how to buy cheap viagra. Key Secondary Outcome The odds of improvement in the ordinal scale score were higher in the remdesivir group, as determined by a proportional odds model at the day 15 visit, than in the placebo group (odds ratio for improvement, 1.50. 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.91 how to buy cheap viagra.

P=0.001. 844 patients) how to buy cheap viagra (Table 2 and Fig. S5).

Mortality was numerically lower in the remdesivir group than in the placebo group, but the difference was not significant (hazard ratio for death, 0.70 how to buy cheap viagra. 95% CI, 0.47 to 1.04. 1059 patients) how to buy cheap viagra.

The Kaplan–Meier estimates of mortality by 14 days were 7.1% and 11.9% in the remdesivir and placebo groups, respectively (Table 2). The Kaplan–Meier estimates of mortality by 28 days are not reported in this preliminary analysis, given the how to buy cheap viagra large number of patients that had yet to complete day 29 visits. An analysis with adjustment for baseline ordinal score as a stratification variable showed a hazard ratio for death of 0.74 (95% CI, 0.50 to 1.10).

Safety Outcomes Serious adverse how to buy cheap viagra events occurred in 114 patients (21.1%) in the remdesivir group and 141 patients (27.0%) in the placebo group (Table S3). 4 events (2 in each group) were judged by site investigators to be related to remdesivir or placebo. There were 28 serious respiratory failure adverse events in the remdesivir group (5.2% of patients) and 42 in how to buy cheap viagra the placebo group (8.0% of patients).

Acute respiratory failure, hypotension, viral pneumonia, and acute kidney injury were slightly more common among patients in the placebo group. No deaths were considered to be related to how to buy cheap viagra treatment assignment, as judged by the site investigators. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurred in 156 patients (28.8%) in the remdesivir group and in 172 in the placebo group (33.0%) (Table S4).

The most common adverse events in the remdesivir group were anemia or decreased how to buy cheap viagra hemoglobin (43 events [7.9%], as compared with 47 [9.0%] in the placebo group). Acute kidney injury, decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate or creatinine clearance, or increased blood creatinine (40 events [7.4%], as compared with 38 [7.3%]). Pyrexia (27 events [5.0%], as compared with 17 [3.3%]).

Hyperglycemia or increased blood glucose level (22 events [4.1%], as compared with 17 [3.3%]) how to buy cheap viagra. And increased aminotransferase levels including alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, or both (22 events [4.1%], as compared with 31 [5.9%]). Otherwise, the incidence of adverse events was not found to be significantly different between the remdesivir group and the placebo group.Trial Design and Oversight The RECOVERY trial was designed to evaluate the effects of potential treatments in patients hospitalized with erectile dysfunction treatment at 176 National Health Service organizations in the United Kingdom and was supported by the National how to buy cheap viagra Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network.

(Details regarding this trial are provided in the Supplementary Appendix, available with the full text of this article at NEJM.org.) The trial is being coordinated by the Nuffield Department of Population Health at the University of Oxford, the trial sponsor. Although the randomization of patients to receive dexamethasone, hydroxychloroquine, or lopinavir–ritonavir has now been stopped, the trial continues how to buy cheap viagra randomization to groups receiving azithromycin, tocilizumab, or convalescent plasma. Hospitalized patients were eligible for the trial if they had clinically suspected or laboratory-confirmed erectile dysfunction and no medical history that might, in the opinion of the attending clinician, put patients at substantial risk if they were to participate in the trial.

Initially, recruitment was limited to patients who were at least 18 years of age, but the age limit was removed how to buy cheap viagra starting on May 9, 2020. Pregnant or breast-feeding women were eligible. Written informed consent how to buy cheap viagra was obtained from all the patients or from a legal representative if they were unable to provide consent.

The trial was conducted in accordance with the principles of the Good Clinical Practice guidelines of the International Conference on Harmonisation and was approved by the U.K. Medicines and Healthcare Products how to buy cheap viagra Regulatory Agency and the Cambridge East Research Ethics Committee. The protocol with its statistical analysis plan is available at NEJM.org and on the trial website at www.recoverytrial.net.

The initial version of how to buy cheap viagra the manuscript was drafted by the first and last authors, developed by the writing committee, and approved by all members of the trial steering committee. The funders had no role in the analysis of the data, in the preparation or approval of the manuscript, or in the decision to submit the manuscript for publication. The first how to buy cheap viagra and last members of the writing committee vouch for the completeness and accuracy of the data and for the fidelity of the trial to the protocol and statistical analysis plan.

Randomization We collected baseline data using a Web-based case-report form that included demographic data, the level of respiratory support, major coexisting illnesses, suitability of the trial treatment for a particular patient, and treatment availability at the trial site. Randomization was performed with the use of a Web-based system with concealment of the how to buy cheap viagra trial-group assignment. Eligible and consenting patients were assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive either the usual standard of care alone or the usual standard of care plus oral or intravenous dexamethasone (at a dose of 6 mg once daily) for up to 10 days (or until hospital discharge if sooner) or to receive one of the other suitable and available treatments that were being evaluated in the trial.

For some patients, dexamethasone was unavailable at the hospital at the time of how to buy cheap viagra enrollment or was considered by the managing physician to be either definitely indicated or definitely contraindicated. These patients were excluded from entry in the randomized comparison between dexamethasone and usual care and hence were not included in this report. The randomly assigned treatment was prescribed how to buy cheap viagra by the treating clinician.

Patients and local members of the trial staff were aware of the assigned treatments. Procedures A single online follow-up form was to be completed when the how to buy cheap viagra patients were discharged or had died or at 28 days after randomization, whichever occurred first. Information was recorded regarding the patients’ adherence to the assigned treatment, receipt of other trial treatments, duration of admission, receipt of respiratory support (with duration and type), receipt of renal support, and vital status (including the cause of death).

In addition, we obtained routine health care and registry data, including information on vital status (with date and cause of how to buy cheap viagra death), discharge from the hospital, and respiratory and renal support therapy. Outcome Measures The primary outcome was all-cause mortality within 28 days after randomization. Further analyses were specified at 6 months.

Secondary outcomes were the time until discharge from the hospital and, among patients not receiving invasive mechanical ventilation at the time of randomization, subsequent how to buy cheap viagra receipt of invasive mechanical ventilation (including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation) or death. Other prespecified clinical outcomes included cause-specific mortality, receipt of renal hemodialysis or hemofiltration, major cardiac arrhythmia (recorded in a subgroup), and receipt and duration of ventilation. Statistical Analysis As stated in the protocol, appropriate sample sizes could not be estimated how to buy cheap viagra when the trial was being planned at the start of the erectile dysfunction treatment viagra.

As the trial progressed, the trial steering committee, whose members were unaware of the results of the trial comparisons, determined that if 28-day mortality was 20%, then the enrollment of at least 2000 patients in the dexamethasone group and 4000 in the usual care group would provide a power of at least 90% at a two-sided P value of 0.01 to detect a clinically relevant proportional reduction of 20% (an absolute difference of 4 percentage points) between the two groups. Consequently, on June 8, 2020, the steering committee closed how to buy cheap viagra recruitment to the dexamethasone group, since enrollment had exceeded 2000 patients. For the primary outcome of 28-day mortality, the hazard ratio from Cox regression was used to estimate the mortality rate ratio.

Among the few patients (0.1%) who had not been followed for 28 days by the time of the how to buy cheap viagra data cutoff on July 6, 2020, data were censored either on that date or on day 29 if the patient had already been discharged. That is, in the absence of any information to the contrary, these patients were assumed to have survived for 28 days. Kaplan–Meier survival curves were constructed to show cumulative mortality how to buy cheap viagra over the 28-day period.

Cox regression was used to analyze the secondary outcome of hospital discharge within 28 days, with censoring of data on day 29 for patients who had died during hospitalization. For the prespecified composite secondary outcome of invasive mechanical ventilation or death within 28 how to buy cheap viagra days (among patients who were not receiving invasive mechanical ventilation at randomization), the precise date of invasive mechanical ventilation was not available, so a log-binomial regression model was used to estimate the risk ratio. Table 1.

Table 1 how to buy cheap viagra. Characteristics of the Patients at Baseline, According to Treatment Assignment and Level of Respiratory Support. Through the play of chance in the unstratified randomization, the mean age was 1.1 years older how to buy cheap viagra among patients in the dexamethasone group than among those in the usual care group (Table 1).

To account for this imbalance in an important prognostic factor, estimates of rate ratios were adjusted for the baseline age in three categories (<70 years, 70 to 79 years, and ≥80 years). This adjustment was not specified in how to buy cheap viagra the first version of the statistical analysis plan but was added once the imbalance in age became apparent. Results without age adjustment (corresponding to the first version of the analysis plan) are provided in the Supplementary Appendix.

Prespecified analyses of the primary how to buy cheap viagra outcome were performed in five subgroups, as defined by characteristics at randomization. Age, sex, level of respiratory support, days since symptom onset, and predicted 28-day mortality risk. (One further prespecified subgroup analysis regarding race will be conducted once the data collection has been completed.) In prespecified subgroups, we estimated rate ratios (or risk ratios in some analyses) and their confidence intervals using regression how to buy cheap viagra models that included an interaction term between the treatment assignment and the subgroup of interest.

Chi-square tests for linear trend across the subgroup-specific log estimates were then performed in accordance with the prespecified plan. All P values how to buy cheap viagra are two-sided and are shown without adjustment for multiple testing. All analyses were performed according to the intention-to-treat principle.

The full database is held by the trial team, which collected the data from trial sites and performed the analyses at the Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford..

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Specificity of erectile dysfunction Antibody Assays Both assays measuring pan-Ig antibodies had low numbers of false positives among samples what would happen if a girl took viagra collected in 2017. There were 0 and 1 false positives for what would happen if a girl took viagra the two assays among 472 samples, results that compared favorably with those obtained with the single IgM anti-N and IgG anti-N assays (Table S3). Because of the low prevalence of erectile dysfunction in Iceland, we required positive results from both pan-Ig antibody assays for a sample to be considered seropositive (see Supplementary Methods in Supplementary Appendix 1). None of the samples collected in early 2020 group were seropositive, which indicates that the viagra had not spread widely in Iceland what would happen if a girl took viagra before February 2020. erectile dysfunction Antibodies among qPCR-Positive Persons Figure 2.

Figure 2 what would happen if a girl took viagra. Antibody Prevalence and Titers among qPCR-Positive Cases as a Function of Time since Diagnosis by qPCR. Shown are the percentages of samples positive for both what would happen if a girl took viagra pan-Ig antibody assays and the antibody titers. Red denotes the count or percentage of samples among persons during their hospitalization (249 samples from 48 persons), and blue denotes the count or percentage of samples among persons after they were declared recovered (1853 samples from 1215 persons). Vertical bars denote what would happen if a girl took viagra 95% confidence intervals.

The dashed lines indicated the thresholds for a test to be declared positive. OD denotes optical density, and RBD receptor what would happen if a girl took viagra binding domain.Table 1. Table 1. Prevalence of erectile dysfunction Antibodies by Sample what would happen if a girl took viagra Collection as Measured by Two Pan-Ig Antibody Assays. Twenty-five days after diagnosis by qPCR, more than 90% of samples from recovered persons tested positive with both pan-Ig antibody assays, and the percentage of persons testing positive remained stable thereafter what would happen if a girl took viagra (Figure 2 and Fig.

S2). Hospitalized persons seroconverted more frequently and quickly after what would happen if a girl took viagra qPCR diagnosis than did nonhospitalized persons (Figure 2 and Fig. S3). Of 1215 persons who had what would happen if a girl took viagra recovered (on the basis of results for the most recently obtained sample from persons for whom we had multiple samples), 1107 were seropositive (91.1%. 95% confidence interval [CI], 89.4 to 92.6) (Table 1 and Table S4).

Since some diagnoses may have been made on the what would happen if a girl took viagra basis of false positive qPCR results, we determined that 91.1% represents the lower bound of sensitivity of the combined pan-Ig tests for the detection of erectile dysfunction antibodies among recovered persons. Table 2. Table 2 what would happen if a girl took viagra. Results of Repeated Pan-Ig Antibody Tests among Recovered qPCR-Diagnosed Persons. Among the 487 recovered persons with two or what would happen if a girl took viagra more samples, 19 (4%) had different pan-Ig antibody test results at different time points (Table 2 and Fig.

S4). It is notable that of the 22 persons with an early sample that tested negative for both pan-Ig antibodies, what would happen if a girl took viagra 19 remained negative at the most recent test date (again, for both antibodies). One person tested positive for both pan-Ig antibodies in the first test and negative for both in the most recent test. The longitudinal changes in what would happen if a girl took viagra antibody levels among recovered persons were consistent with the cross-sectional results (Fig. S5).

Antibody levels were higher in the last sample than in the first sample when the antibodies were measured with the two pan-Ig assays, slightly lower than in the first sample when measured with IgG anti-N and IgG anti-S1 assays, and substantially lower than in the first sample when measured with IgM anti-N and IgA anti-S1 assays. IgG anti-N, IgM anti-N, IgG anti-S1, and IgA anti-S1 antibody levels were correlated among the qPCR-positive persons (Figs. S5 and S6 and Table S5). Antibody levels measured with both pan-Ig antibody assays increased over the first 2 months after qPCR diagnosis and remained at a plateau over the next 2 months of the study. IgM anti-N antibody levels increased rapidly soon after diagnosis and then fell rapidly and were generally not detected after 2 months.

IgA anti-S1 antibodies decreased 1 month after diagnosis and remained detectable thereafter. IgG anti-N and anti-S1 antibody levels increased during the first 6 weeks after diagnosis and then decreased slightly. erectile dysfunction in Quarantine Table 3. Table 3. erectile dysfunction among Quarantined Persons According to Exposure Type and Presence of Symptoms.

Of the 1797 qPCR-positive Icelanders, 1088 (61%) were in quarantine when erectile dysfunction was diagnosed by qPCR. We tested for antibodies among 4222 quarantined persons who had not tested qPCR-positive (they had received a negative result by qPCR or had simply not been tested). Of those 4222 quarantined persons, 97 (2.3%. 95% CI, 1.9 to 2.8) were seropositive (Table 1). Those with household exposure were 5.2 (95% CI, 3.3 to 8.0) times more likely to be seropositive than those with other types of exposure (Table 3).

Similarly, a positive result by qPCR for those with household exposure was 5.2 (95% CI, 4.5 to 6.1) times more likely than for those with other types of exposure. When these two sets of results (qPCR-positive and seropositive) were combined, we calculated that 26.6% of quarantined persons with household exposure and 5.0% of quarantined persons without household exposure were infected. Those who had symptoms during quarantine were 3.2 (95% CI, 1.7 to 6.2) times more likely to be seropositive and 18.2 times (95% CI, 14.8 to 22.4) more likely to test positive with qPCR than those without symptoms. We also tested persons in two regions of Iceland affected by cluster outbreaks. In a erectile dysfunction cluster in Vestfirdir, 1.4% of residents were qPCR-positive and 10% of residents were quarantined.

We found that none of the 326 persons outside quarantine who had not been tested by qPCR (or who tested negative) were seropositive. In a cluster in Vestmannaeyjar, 2.3% of residents were qPCR-positive and 13% of residents were quarantined. Of the 447 quarantined persons who had not received a qPCR-positive result, 4 were seropositive (0.9%. 95% CI, 0.3 to 2.1). Of the 663 outside quarantine in Vestmannaeyjar, 3 were seropositive (0.5%.

95% CI, 0.1 to 0.2%). erectile dysfunction Seroprevalence in Iceland None of the serum samples collected from 470 healthy Icelanders between February 18 and March 9, 2020, tested positive for both pan-Ig antibodies, although four were positive for the pan-Ig anti-N assay (0.9%), a finding that suggests that the viagra had not spread widely in Iceland before March 9. Of the 18,609 persons tested for erectile dysfunction antibodies through contact with the Icelandic health care system for reasons other than erectile dysfunction treatment, 39 were positive for both pan-Ig antibody assays (estimated seroprevalence by weighting the sample on the basis of residence, sex, and 10-year age category, 0.3%. 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4). There were regional differences in the percentages of qPCR-positive persons across Iceland that were roughly proportional to the percentage of people quarantined (Table S6).

However, after exclusion of the qPCR-positive and quarantined persons, the percentage of persons who tested positive for erectile dysfunction antibodies did not correlate with the percentage of those who tested positive by qPCR. The estimated seroprevalence in the random sample collection from Reykjavik (0.4%. 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.6) was similar to that in the Health Care group (0.3%. 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4) (Table S6). We calculate that 0.5% of the residents of Iceland have tested positive with qPCR.

The 2.3% with erectile dysfunction seroconversion among persons in quarantine extrapolates to 0.1% of Icelandic residents. On the basis of this finding and the seroprevalence from the Health Care group, we estimate that 0.9% (95% CI, 0.8 to 0.9) of the population of Iceland has been infected by erectile dysfunction. Approximately 56% of all erectile dysfunction s were therefore diagnosed by qPCR, 14% occurred in quarantine without having been diagnosed with qPCR, and the remaining 30% of s occurred outside quarantine and were not detected by qPCR. Deaths from erectile dysfunction treatment in Iceland In Iceland, 10 deaths have been attributed to erectile dysfunction treatment, which corresponds to 3 deaths per 100,000 nationwide. Among the qPCR-positive cases, 0.6% (95% CI, 0.3 to 1.0) were fatal.

Using the 0.9% prevalence of erectile dysfunction in Iceland as the denominator, however, we calculate an fatality risk of 0.3% (95% CI, 0.2 to 0.6). Stratified by age, the fatality risk was substantially lower in those 70 years old or younger (0.1%. 95% CI, 0.0 to 0.3) than in those over 70 years of age (4.4%. 95% CI, 1.9 to 8.4) (Table S7). Age, Sex, Clinical Characteristics, and Antibody Levels Table 4.

Table 4. Association of Existing Conditions and erectile dysfunction treatment Severity with erectile dysfunction Antibody Levels among Recovered Persons. erectile dysfunction antibody levels were higher in older people and in those who were hospitalized (Table 4, and Table S8 [described in Supplementary Appendix 1 and available in Supplementary Appendix 2]). Pan-Ig anti–S1-RBD and IgA anti-S1 levels were lower in female persons. Of the preexisting conditions, and after adjustment for multiple testing, we found that body-mass index, smoking status, and use of antiinflammatory medication were associated with erectile dysfunction antibody levels.

Body-mass index correlated positively with antibody levels. Smokers and users of antiinflammatory medication had lower antibody levels. With respect to clinical characteristics, antibody levels were most strongly associated with hospitalization and clinical severity, followed by clinical symptoms such as fever, maximum temperature reading, cough, and loss of appetite. Severity of these individual symptoms, with the exception of loss of energy, was associated with higher antibody levels.To the Editor. Rapid and accurate diagnostic tests are essential for controlling the ongoing erectile dysfunction treatment viagra.

Although the current standard involves testing of nasopharyngeal swab specimens by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) to detect erectile dysfunction, saliva specimens may be an alternative diagnostic sample.1-4 Rigorous evaluation is needed to determine how saliva specimens compare with nasopharyngeal swab specimens with respect to sensitivity in detection of erectile dysfunction during the course of . A total of 70 inpatients with erectile dysfunction treatment provided written informed consent to participate in our study (see the Methods section in Supplementary Appendix 1, available with the full text of this letter at NEJM.org). After erectile dysfunction treatment was confirmed with a positive nasopharyngeal swab specimen at hospital admission, we obtained additional samples from the patients during hospitalization. We tested saliva specimens collected by the patients themselves and nasopharyngeal swabs collected from the patients at the same time point by health care workers. Figure 1.

Figure 1. erectile dysfunction RNA Titers in Saliva Specimens and Nasopharyngeal Swab Specimens. Samples were obtained from 70 hospital inpatients who had a diagnosis of erectile dysfunction treatment. Panel A shows erectile dysfunction RNA titers in the first available nasopharyngeal and saliva samples. The lines indicate samples from the same patient.

Results were compared with the use of a Wilcoxon signed-rank test (P<0.001). Panel B shows percentages of positivity for erectile dysfunction in tests of the first matched nasopharyngeal and saliva samples at 1 to 5 days, 6 to 10 days, and 11 or more days (maximum, 53 days) after the diagnosis of erectile dysfunction treatment. Panel C shows longitudinal erectile dysfunction RNA copies per milliliter in 97 saliva samples, according to days since symptom onset. Each circle represents a separate sample. Dashed lines indicate additional samples from the same patient.

The red line indicates a negative saliva sample that was followed by a positive sample at the next collection of a specimen. Panel D shows longitudinal erectile dysfunction RNA copies per milliliter in 97 nasopharyngeal swab specimens, according to days since symptom onset. The red lines indicate negative nasopharyngeal swab specimens there were followed by a positive swab at the next collection of a specimen. The gray area in Panels C and D indicates samples that were below the lower limit of detection of 5610 viagra RNA copies per milliliter of sample, which is at cycle threshold 38 of our quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay targeting the erectile dysfunction N1 sequence recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To analyze these data, we used a linear mixed-effects regression model (see Supplementary Appendix 1) that accounts for the correlation between samples collected from the same person at a single time point (i.e., multivariate response) and the correlation between samples collected across time from the same patient (i.e., repeated measures).

All the data used to generate this figure, including the raw cycle thresholds, are provided in Supplementary Data 1 in Supplementary Appendix 2.Using primer sequences from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we detected more erectile dysfunction RNA copies in the saliva specimens (mean log copies per milliliter, 5.58. 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.09 to 6.07) than in the nasopharyngeal swab specimens (mean log copies per milliliter, 4.93. 95% CI, 4.53 to 5.33) (Figure 1A, and Fig. S1 in Supplementary Appendix 1). In addition, a higher percentage of saliva samples than nasopharyngeal swab samples were positive up to 10 days after the erectile dysfunction treatment diagnosis (Figure 1B).

At 1 to 5 days after diagnosis, 81% (95% CI, 71 to 96) of the saliva samples were positive, as compared with 71% (95% CI, 67 to 94) of the nasopharyngeal swab specimens. These findings suggest that saliva specimens and nasopharyngeal swab specimens have at least similar sensitivity in the detection of erectile dysfunction during the course of hospitalization. Because the results of testing of nasopharyngeal swab specimens to detect erectile dysfunction may vary with repeated sampling in individual patients,5 we evaluated viral detection in matched samples over time. The level of erectile dysfunction RNA decreased after symptom onset in both saliva specimens (estimated slope, −0.11. 95% credible interval, −0.15 to −0.06) (Figure 1C) and nasopharyngeal swab specimens (estimated slope, −0.09.

95% credible interval, −0.13 to −0.05) (Figure 1D). In three instances, a negative nasopharyngeal swab specimen was followed by a positive swab at the next collection of a specimen (Figure 1D). This phenomenon occurred only once with the saliva specimens (Figure 1C). During the clinical course, we observed less variation in levels of erectile dysfunction RNA in the saliva specimens (standard deviation, 0.98 viagra RNA copies per milliliter. 95% credible interval, 0.08 to 1.98) than in the nasopharyngeal swab specimens (standard deviation, 2.01 viagra RNA copies per milliliter.

95% credible interval, 1.29 to 2.70) (see Supplementary Appendix 1). Recent studies have shown that erectile dysfunction can be detected in the saliva of asymptomatic persons and outpatients.1-3 We therefore screened 495 asymptomatic health care workers who provided written informed consent to participate in our prospective study, and we used RT-qPCR to test both saliva and nasopharyngeal samples obtained from these persons. We detected erectile dysfunction RNA in saliva specimens obtained from 13 persons who did not report any symptoms at or before the time of sample collection. Of these 13 health care workers, 9 had collected matched nasopharyngeal swab specimens by themselves on the same day, and 7 of these specimens tested negative (Fig. S2).

The diagnosis in the 13 health care workers with positive saliva specimens was later confirmed in diagnostic testing of additional nasopharyngeal samples by a CLIA (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988)–certified laboratory. Variation in nasopharyngeal sampling may be an explanation for false negative results, so monitoring an internal control for proper sample collection may provide an alternative evaluation technique. In specimens collected from inpatients by health care workers, we found greater variation in human RNase P cycle threshold (Ct) values in nasopharyngeal swab specimens (standard deviation, 2.89 Ct. 95% CI, 26.53 to 27.69) than in saliva specimens (standard deviation, 2.49 Ct. 95% CI, 23.35 to 24.35).

When health care workers collected their own specimens, we also found greater variation in RNase P Ct values in nasopharyngeal swab specimens (standard deviation, 2.26 Ct. 95% CI, 28.39 to 28.56) than in saliva specimens (standard deviation , 1.65 Ct. 95% CI, 24.14 to 24.26) (Fig. S3). Collection of saliva samples by patients themselves negates the need for direct interaction between health care workers and patients.

This interaction is a source of major testing bottlenecks and presents a risk of nosocomial . Collection of saliva samples by patients themselves also alleviates demands for supplies of swabs and personal protective equipment. Given the growing need for testing, our findings provide support for the potential of saliva specimens in the diagnosis of erectile dysfunction . Anne L. Wyllie, Ph.D.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT [email protected]John Fournier, M.D.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTArnau Casanovas-Massana, Ph.D.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTMelissa Campbell, M.D.Maria Tokuyama, Ph.D.Pavithra Vijayakumar, B.A.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTJoshua L.

Warren, Ph.D.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTBertie Geng, M.D.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTM. Catherine Muenker, M.S.Adam J. Moore, M.P.H.Chantal B.F. Vogels, Ph.D.Mary E. Petrone, B.S.Isabel M.

Ott, B.S.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTPeiwen Lu, Ph.D.Arvind Venkataraman, B.S.Alice Lu-Culligan, B.S.Jonathan Klein, B.S.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTRebecca Earnest, M.P.H.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTMichael Simonov, M.D.Rupak Datta, M.D., Ph.D.Ryan Handoko, M.D.Nida Naushad, B.S.Lorenzo R. Sewanan, M.Phil.Jordan Valdez, B.S.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTElizabeth B. White, A.B.Sarah Lapidus, M.S.Chaney C. Kalinich, M.P.H.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTXiaodong Jiang, M.D., Ph.D.Daniel J. Kim, A.B.Eriko Kudo, Ph.D.Melissa Linehan, M.S.Tianyang Mao, B.S.Miyu Moriyama, Ph.D.Ji E.

Oh, M.D., Ph.D.Annsea Park, B.A.Julio Silva, B.S.Eric Song, M.S.Takehiro Takahashi, M.D., Ph.D.Manabu Taura, Ph.D.Orr-El Weizman, B.A.Patrick Wong, M.S.Yexin Yang, B.S.Santos Bermejo, B.S.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTCamila D. Odio, M.D.Yale New Haven Health, New Haven, CTSaad B. Omer, M.B., B.S., Ph.D.Yale Institute for Global Health, New Haven, CTCharles S. Dela Cruz, M.D., Ph.D.Shelli Farhadian, M.D., Ph.D.Richard A. Martinello, M.D.Akiko Iwasaki, Ph.D.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTNathan D.

Grubaugh, Ph.D.Albert I. Ko, M.D.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT [email protected], [email protected] Supported by the Huffman Family Donor Advised Fund, a Fast Grant from Emergent Ventures at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, the Yale Institute for Global Health, the Yale School of Medicine, a grant (U19 AI08992, to Dr. Ko) from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the Beatrice Kleinberg Neuwirth Fund, and a grant (Rubicon 019.181EN.004, to Dr. Vogel) from the Dutch Research Council (NWO). Disclosure forms provided by the authors are available with the full text of this letter at NEJM.org.

This letter was published on August 28, 2020, at NEJM.org. Drs. Grubaugh and Ko contributed equally to this letter. 5 References1. Kojima N, Turner F, Slepnev V, et al.

Self-collected oral fluid and nasal swabs demonstrate comparable sensitivity to clinician collected nasopharyngeal swabs for erectile dysfunction treatment detection. April 15, 2020 (https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.04.11.20062372v1). Preprint.Google Scholar2. Williams E, Bond K, Zhang B, Putland M, Williamson DA. Saliva as a non-invasive specimen for detection of erectile dysfunction.

J Clin Microbiol 2020;58(8):e00776-20-e00776-20.3. Pasomsub E, Watcharananan SP, Boonyawat K, et al. Saliva sample as a non-invasive specimen for the diagnosis of erectile dysfunction disease 2019. A cross-sectional study. Clin Microbiol Infect 2020 May 15 (Epub ahead of print).4.

Vogels CBF, Brackney D, Wang J, et al. SalivaDirect. Simple and sensitive molecular diagnostic test for erectile dysfunction surveillance. August 4, 2020 (https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.08.03.20167791v1). Preprint.Google Scholar5.

Zou L, Ruan F, Huang M, et al. erectile dysfunction viral load in upper respiratory specimens of infected patients. N Engl J Med 2020;382:1177-1179.Trial Population Table 1. Table 1. Demographic Characteristics of the Participants in the NVX-CoV2373 Trial at Enrollment.

The trial was initiated on May 26, 2020. 134 participants underwent randomization between May 27 and June 6, 2020, including 3 participants who were to serve as backups for sentinel dosing and who immediately withdrew from the trial without being vaccinated (Fig. S1). Of the 131 participants who received injections, 23 received placebo (group A), 25 received 25-μg doses of rerectile dysfunction (group B), 29 received 5-μg doses of rerectile dysfunction plus Matrix-M1, including three sentinels (group C), 28 received 25-μg doses of rerectile dysfunction plus Matrix-M1, including three sentinels (group D), and 26 received a single 25-μg dose of rerectile dysfunction plus Matrix-M1 followed by a single dose of placebo (group E). All 131 participants received their first vaccination on day 0, and all but 3 received their second vaccination at least 21 days later.

Exceptions include 2 in the placebo group (group A) who withdrew consent (unrelated to any adverse event) and 1 in the 25-μg rerectile dysfunction + Matrix-M1 group (group D) who had an unsolicited adverse event (mild cellulitis. See below). Demographic characteristics of the participants are presented in Table 1. Of note, missing data were infrequent. Safety Outcomes No serious adverse events or adverse events of special interest were reported, and vaccination pause rules were not implemented.

As noted above, one participant did not receive a second vaccination owing to an unsolicited adverse event, mild cellulitis, that was associated with after an intravenous cannula placement to address an unrelated mild adverse event that occurred during the second week of follow-up. Second vaccination was withheld because the participant was still recovering and receiving antibiotics. This participant remains in the trial. Figure 2. Figure 2.

Solicited Local and Systemic Adverse Events. The percentage of participants in each treatment group (groups A, B, C, D, and E) with adverse events according to the maximum FDA toxicity grade (mild, moderate, or severe) during the 7 days after each vaccination is plotted for solicited local (Panel A) and systemic (Panel B) adverse events. There were no grade 4 (life-threatening) events. Participants who reported 0 events make up the remainder of the 100% calculation (not displayed). Excluded were the three sentinel participants in groups C (5 μg + Matrix-M1, 5 μg + Matrix-M1) and D (25 μg + Matrix-M1, 25 μg + Matrix-M1), who received the trial treatment in an open-label manner (see Table S7 for complete safety data on all participants).Overall reactogenicity was largely absent or mild, and second vaccinations were neither withheld nor delayed due to reactogenicity.

After the first vaccination, local and systemic reactogenicity was absent or mild in the majority of participants (local. 100%, 96%, 89%, 84%, and 88% of participants in groups A, B, C, D, and E, respectively. Systemic. 91%, 92%, 96%, 68%, and 89%) who were unaware of treatment assignment (Figure 2 and Table S7). Two participants (2%), one each in groups D and E, had severe adverse events (headache, fatigue, and malaise).

Two participants, one each in groups A and E, had reactogenicity events (fatigue, malaise, and tenderness) that extended 2 days after day 7. After the second vaccination, local and systemic reactogenicity were absent or mild in the majority of participants in the five groups (local. 100%, 100%, 65%, 67%, and 100% of participants, respectively. Systemic. 86%, 84%, 73%, 58%, and 96%) who were unaware of treatment assignment.

One participant, in group D, had a severe local event (tenderness), and eight participants, one or two participants in each group, had severe systemic events. The most common severe systemic events were joint pain and fatigue. Only one participant, in group D, had fever (temperature, 38.1°C) after the second vaccination, on day 1 only. No adverse event extended beyond 7 days after the second vaccination. Of note, the mean duration of reactogenicity events was 2 days or less for both the first vaccination and second vaccination periods.

Laboratory abnormalities of grade 2 or higher occurred in 13 participants (10%). 9 after the first vaccination and 4 after the second vaccination (Table S8). Abnormal laboratory values were not associated with any clinical manifestations and showed no worsening with repeat vaccination. Six participants (5%. Five women and one man) had grade 2 or higher transient reductions in hemoglobin from baseline, with no evidence of hemolysis or microcytic anemia and with resolution within 7 to 21 days.

Of the six, two had an absolute hemoglobin value (grade 2) that resolved or stabilized during the testing period. Four participants (3%), including one who had received placebo, had elevated liver enzymes that were noted after the first vaccination and resolved within 7 to 14 days (i.e., before the second vaccination). Vital signs remained stable immediately after vaccination and at all visits. Unsolicited adverse events (Table S9) were predominantly mild in severity (in 71%, 91%, 83%, 90%, and 82% of participants in groups A, B, C, D, and E, respectively) and were similarly distributed across the groups receiving adjuvanted and unadjuvanted treatment. There were no reports of severe adverse events.

Immunogenicity Outcomes Figure 3. Figure 3. erectile dysfunction Anti-Spike IgG and Neutralizing Antibody Responses. Shown are geometric mean anti-spike IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) unit responses to recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome erectile dysfunction 2 (rerectile dysfunction) protein antigens (Panel A) and wild-type erectile dysfunction microneutralization assay at an inhibitory concentration greater than 99% (MN IC>99%) titer responses (Panel B) at baseline (day 0), 3 weeks after the first vaccination (day 21), and 2 weeks after the second vaccination (day 35) for the placebo group (group A), the 25-μg unadjuvanted group (group B), the 5-μg and 25-μg adjuvanted groups (groups C and D, respectively), and the 25-μg adjuvanted and placebo group (group E). Diamonds and whisker endpoints represent geometric mean titer values and 95% confidence intervals, respectively.

The erectile dysfunction treatment human convalescent serum panel includes specimens from PCR-confirmed erectile dysfunction treatment participants, obtained from Baylor College of Medicine (29 specimens for ELISA and 32 specimens for MN IC>99%), with geometric mean titer values according to erectile dysfunction treatment severity. The severity of erectile dysfunction treatment is indicated by the colors of the dots for hospitalized patients (including those in intensive care), symptomatic outpatients (with samples collected in the emergency department), and asymptomatic patients who had been exposed to erectile dysfunction treatment (with samples collected during contact and exposure assessment). Mean values (in black) for human convalescent serum are depicted next to (and of same color as) the category of erectile dysfunction treatment patients, with the overall mean shown above the scatter plot (in black). For each trial treatment group, the mean at day 35 is depicted above the scatterplot.ELISA anti-spike IgG geometric mean ELISA units (GMEUs) ranged from 105 to 116 at day 0. By day 21, responses had occurred for all adjuvanted regimens (1984, 2626, and 3317 GMEUs for groups C, D, and E, respectively), and geometric mean fold rises (GMFRs) exceeded those induced without adjuvant by a factor of at least 10 (Figure 3 and Table S10).

Within 7 days after the second vaccination with adjuvant (day 28. Groups C and D), GMEUs had further increased by a factor of 8 (to 15,319 and 20,429, respectively) over responses seen with the first vaccination, and within 14 days (day 35), responses had more than doubled yet again (to 63,160 and 47,521, respectively), achieving GMFRs that were approximately 100 times greater than those observed with rerectile dysfunction alone. A single vaccination with adjuvant achieved GMEU levels similar to those in asymptomatic (exposed) patients with erectile dysfunction treatment (1661), and a second vaccination with adjuvant achieved GMEU levels that exceeded those in convalescent serum from symptomatic outpatients with erectile dysfunction treatment (7420) by a factor of at least 6 and rose to levels similar to those in convalescent serum from patients hospitalized with erectile dysfunction treatment (53,391). The responses in the two-dose 5-μg and 25-μg adjuvanted treatment regimens were similar, a finding that highlights the role of adjuvant dose sparing. Neutralizing antibodies were undetectable before vaccination and had patterns of response similar to those of anti-spike antibodies after vaccination with adjuvant (Figure 3 and Table S11).

After the first vaccination (day 21), GMFRs were approximately 5 times greater with adjuvant (5.2, 6.3, and 5.9 for groups C, D, and E, respectively) than without adjuvant (1.1). By day 35, second vaccinations with adjuvant induced an increase more than 100 times greater (195 and 165 for groups C and D, respectively) than single vaccinations without adjuvant. When compared with convalescent serum, second vaccinations with adjuvant resulted in GMT levels approximately 4 times greater (3906 and 3305 for groups C and D, respectively) than those in symptomatic outpatients with erectile dysfunction treatment (837) and approached the magnitude of levels observed in hospitalized patients with erectile dysfunction treatment (7457). At day 35, ELISA anti-spike IgG GMEUs and neutralizing antibodies induced by the two-dose 5-μg and 25-μg adjuvanted treatment regimens were 4 to 6 times greater than the geometric mean convalescent serum measures (8344 and 983, respectively). Figure 4.

Figure 4. Correlation of Anti-Spike IgG and Neutralizing Antibody Responses. Shown are scatter plots of 100% wild-type neutralizing antibody responses and anti-spike IgG ELISA unit responses at 3 weeks after the first vaccination (day 21) and 2 weeks after the second vaccination (day 35) for the two-dose 25-μg unadjuvanted treatment (group B. Panel A), the combined two-dose 5-μg and 25-μg adjuvanted treatment (groups C and D, respectively. Panel B), and convalescent serum from patients with erectile dysfunction treatment (Panel C).

In Panel C, the severity of erectile dysfunction treatment is indicated by the colors of the dots for hospitalized patients (including those in intensive care), symptomatic outpatients (with samples collected in the emergency department), and asymptomatic patients who had been exposed to erectile dysfunction treatment (with samples collected during contact and exposure assessment).A strong correlation was observed between neutralizing antibody titers and anti-spike IgG GMEUs with adjuvanted treatment at day 35 (correlation, 0.95) (Figure 4), a finding that was not observed with unadjuvanted treatment (correlation, 0.76) but was similar to that of convalescent serum (correlation, 0.96). Two-dose regimens of 5-μg and 25-μg rerectile dysfunction plus Matrix-M1 produced similar magnitudes of response, and every participant had seroconversion according to either assay measurement. Reverse cumulative-distribution curves for day 35 are presented in Figure S2. Figure 5. Figure 5.

Rerectile dysfunction CD4+ T-cell Responses with or without Matrix-M1 Adjuvant. Frequencies of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells producing T helper 1 (Th1) cytokines interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-2 and for T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines interleukin-5 and interleukin-13 indicated cytokines from four participants each in the placebo (group A), 25-μg unadjuvanted (group B), 5-μg adjuvanted (group C), and 25-μg adjuvanted (group D) groups at baseline (day 0) and 1 week after the second vaccination (day 28) after stimulation with the recombinant spike protein. €œAny 2Th1” indicates CD4+ T cells that can produce two types of Th1 cytokines at the same time. €œAll 3 Th1” indicates CD4+ T cells that produce IFN-γ, TNF-α, and interleukin-2 simultaneously. €œBoth Th2” indicates CD4+ T cells that can produce Th2 cytokines interleukin-5 and interleukin-13 at the same time.T-cell responses in 16 participants who were randomly selected from groups A through D, 4 participants per group, showed that adjuvanted regimens induced antigen-specific polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses that were reflected in IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α production on spike protein stimulation.

A strong bias toward this Th1 phenotype was noted. Th2 responses (as measured by IL-5 and IL-13 cytokines) were minimal (Figure 5).Start Preamble Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. Extension of timeline for publication of final rule. This notice announces an extension of the timeline for publication of a Medicare final rule in accordance with the Social Security Act, which allows us to extend the timeline for publication of the final rule.

As of August 26, 2020, the timeline for publication of the final rule to finalize the provisions of the October 17, 2019 proposed rule (84 FR 55766) is extended until August 31, 2021. Start Further Info Lisa O. Wilson, (410) 786-8852. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information In the October 17, 2019 Federal Register (84 FR 55766), we published a proposed rule that addressed undue regulatory impact and burden of the physician self-referral law. The proposed rule was issued in conjunction with the Centers for Medicare &.

Medicaid Services' (CMS) Patients over Paperwork initiative and the Department of Health and Human Services' (the Department or HHS) Regulatory Sprint to Coordinated Care. In the proposed rule, we proposed exceptions to the physician self-referral law for certain value-based compensation arrangements between or among physicians, providers, and suppliers. A new exception for certain arrangements under which a physician receives limited remuneration for items or services actually provided by the physician. A new exception for donations of cybersecurity technology and related services. And amendments to the existing exception for electronic health records (EHR) items and services.

The proposed rule also provides critically necessary guidance for physicians and health care providers and suppliers whose financial relationships are governed by the physician self-referral statute and regulations. This notice announces an extension of the timeline for publication of the final rule and the continuation of effectiveness of the proposed rule. Section 1871(a)(3)(A) of the Social Security Act (the Act) requires us to establish and publish a regular timeline for the publication of final regulations based on the previous publication of a proposed regulation. In accordance with section 1871(a)(3)(B) of the Act, the timeline may vary among different regulations based on differences in the complexity of the regulation, the number and scope of comments received, and other relevant factors, but may not be longer than 3 years except under exceptional circumstances. In addition, in accordance with section 1871(a)(3)(B) of the Act, the Secretary may extend the initial targeted publication date of the final regulation if the Secretary, no later than the regulation's previously established proposed publication date, publishes a notice with the new target date, and such notice includes a brief explanation of the justification for the variation.

We announced in the Spring 2020 Unified Agenda (June 30, 2020, www.reginfo.gov) that we would issue the final rule in August 2020. However, we are still working through the Start Printed Page 52941complexity of the issues raised by comments received on the proposed rule and therefore we are not able to meet the announced publication target date. This notice extends the timeline for publication of the final rule until August 31, 2021. Start Signature Dated. August 24, 2020.

Wilma M. Robinson, Deputy Executive Secretary to the Department, Department of Health and Human Services. End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2020-18867 Filed 8-26-20. 8:45 am]BILLING CODE 4120-01-PStart Preamble Notice of amendment.

The Secretary issues this amendment pursuant to section 319F-3 of the Public Health Service Act to add additional categories of Qualified Persons and amend the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures. This amendment to the Declaration published on March 17, 2020 (85 FR 15198) is effective as of August 24, 2020. Start Further Info Robert P. Kadlec, MD, MTM&H, MS, Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Office of the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20201. Telephone.

202-205-2882. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information The Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act (PREP Act) authorizes the Secretary of Health and Human Services (the Secretary) to issue a Declaration to provide liability immunity to certain individuals and entities (Covered Persons) against any claim of loss caused by, arising out of, relating to, or resulting from the manufacture, distribution, administration, or use of medical countermeasures (Covered Countermeasures), except for claims involving “willful misconduct” as defined in the PREP Act. Under the PREP Act, a Declaration may be amended as circumstances warrant. The PREP Act was enacted on December 30, 2005, as Public Law 109-148, Division C, § 2. It amended the Public Health Service (PHS) Act, adding section 319F-3, which addresses liability immunity, and section 319F-4, which creates a compensation program.

These sections are codified at 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d and 42 U.S.C. 247d-6e, respectively. Section 319F-3 of the PHS Act has been amended by the viagra and All-Hazards Preparedness Reauthorization Act (PAHPRA), Public Law 113-5, enacted on March 13, 2013 and the erectile dysfunction Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, Public Law 116-136, enacted on March 27, Start Printed Page 521372020, to expand Covered Countermeasures under the PREP Act. On January 31, 2020, the Secretary declared a public health emergency pursuant to section 319 of the PHS Act, 42 U.S.C.

247d, effective January 27, 2020, for the entire United States to aid in the response of the nation's health care community to the erectile dysfunction treatment outbreak. Pursuant to section 319 of the PHS Act, the Secretary renewed that declaration on April 26, 2020, and July 25, 2020. On March 10, 2020, the Secretary issued a Declaration under the PREP Act for medical countermeasures against erectile dysfunction treatment (85 FR 15198, Mar. 17, 2020) (the Declaration). On April 10, the Secretary amended the Declaration under the PREP Act to extend liability immunity to covered countermeasures authorized under the CARES Act (85 FR 21012, Apr.

15, 2020). On June 4, the Secretary amended the Declaration to clarify that covered countermeasures under the Declaration include qualified countermeasures that limit the harm erectile dysfunction treatment might otherwise cause. The Secretary now amends section V of the Declaration to identify as qualified persons covered under the PREP Act, and thus authorizes, certain State-licensed pharmacists to order and administer, and pharmacy interns (who are licensed or registered by their State board of pharmacy and acting under the supervision of a State-licensed pharmacist) to administer, any treatment that the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends to persons ages three through 18 according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule (ACIP-recommended treatments).[] The Secretary also amends section VIII of the Declaration to clarify that the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures includes not only erectile dysfunction treatment caused by erectile dysfunction or a viagra mutating therefrom, but also other diseases, health conditions, or threats that may have been caused by erectile dysfunction treatment, erectile dysfunction, or a viagra mutating therefrom, including the decrease in the rate of childhood immunizations, which will lead to an increase in the rate of infectious diseases. Description of This Amendment by Section Section V. Covered Persons Under the PREP Act and the Declaration, a “qualified person” is a “covered person.” Subject to certain limitations, a covered person is immune from suit and liability under Federal and State law with respect to all claims for loss caused by, arising out of, relating to, or resulting from the administration or use of a covered countermeasure if a declaration under subsection (b) has been issued with respect to such countermeasure.

€œQualified person” includes (A) a licensed health professional or other individual who is authorized to prescribe, administer, or dispense such countermeasures under the law of the State in which the countermeasure was prescribed, administered, or dispensed. Or (B) “a person within a category of persons so identified in a declaration by the Secretary” under subsection (b) of the PREP Act. 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d(i)(8).[] By this amendment to the Declaration, the Secretary identifies an additional category of persons who are qualified persons under section 247d-6d(i)(8)(B).[] On May 8, 2020, CDC reported, “The identified declines in routine pediatric treatment ordering and doses administered might indicate that U.S. Children and their communities face increased risks for outbreaks of treatment-preventable diseases,” and suggested that a decrease in rates of routine childhood vaccinations were due to changes in healthcare access, social distancing, and other erectile dysfunction treatment mitigation strategies.[] The report also stated that “[p]arental concerns about potentially exposing their children to erectile dysfunction treatment during well child visits might contribute to the declines observed.” [] On July 10, 2020, CDC reported its findings of a May survey it conducted to assess the capacity of pediatric health care practices to provide immunization services to children during the erectile dysfunction treatment viagra.

The survey, which was limited to practices participating in the treatments for Children program, found that, as of mid-May, 15 percent of Northeast pediatric practices were closed, 12.5 percent of Midwest practices were closed, 6.2 percent of practices in the South were closed, and 10 percent of practices in the West were closed. Most practices had reduced office hours for in-person visits. When asked whether their practices would likely be able to accommodate new patients for immunization services through August, 418 practices (21.3 percent) either responded that this was not likely or the practice was permanently closed or not resuming immunization services for all patients, and 380 (19.6 percent) responded that they were unsure. Urban practices and those in the Northeast were less likely to be able to accommodate new patients compared with rural practices and those in the South, Midwest, or West.[] In response to these troubling developments, CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics have stressed, “Well-child visits and vaccinations are essential services and help make sure children are protected.” [] The Secretary re-emphasizes that important recommendation to parents and legal guardians here. If your child is due for a well-child visit, contact your pediatrician's or other primary-care provider's office and ask about ways that the office safely offers well-child visits and vaccinations.

Many medical offices are taking extra steps to make sure that well-child visits can occur safely during the erectile dysfunction treatment viagra, including. Scheduling sick visits and well-child visits during different times of the Start Printed Page 52138day or days of the week, or at different locations. Asking patients to remain outside until it is time for their appointments to reduce the number of people in waiting rooms. Adhering to recommended social (physical) distancing and other -control practices, such as the use of masks. The decrease in childhood-vaccination rates is a public health threat and a collateral harm caused by erectile dysfunction treatment.

Together, the United States must turn to available medical professionals to limit the harm and public health threats that may result from decreased immunization rates. We must quickly do so to avoid preventable s in children, additional strains on our healthcare system, and any further increase in avoidable adverse health consequences—particularly if such complications coincide with additional resurgence of erectile dysfunction treatment. Together with pediatricians and other healthcare professionals, pharmacists are positioned to expand access to childhood vaccinations. Many States already allow pharmacists to administer treatments to children of any age.[] Other States permit pharmacists to administer treatments to children depending on the age—for example, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, or 12 years of age and older.[] Few States restrict pharmacist-administered vaccinations to only adults.[] Many States also allow properly trained individuals under the supervision of a trained pharmacist to administer those treatments.[] Pharmacists are well positioned to increase access to vaccinations, particularly in certain areas or for certain populations that have too few pediatricians and other primary-care providers, or that are otherwise medically underserved.[] As of 2018, nearly 90 percent of Americans lived within five miles of a community pharmacy.[] Pharmacies often offer extended hours and added convenience. What is more, pharmacists are trusted healthcare professionals with established relationships with their patients.

Pharmacists also have strong relationships with local medical providers and hospitals to refer patients as appropriate. For example, pharmacists already play a significant role in annual influenza vaccination. In the early 2018-19 season, they administered the influenza treatment to nearly a third of all adults who received the treatment.[] Given the potential danger of serious influenza and continuing erectile dysfunction treatment outbreaks this autumn and the impact that such concurrent outbreaks may have on our population, our healthcare system, and our whole-of-nation response to the erectile dysfunction treatment viagra, we must quickly expand access to influenza vaccinations. Allowing more qualified pharmacists to administer the influenza treatment to children will make vaccinations more accessible. Therefore, the Secretary amends the Declaration to identify State-licensed pharmacists (and pharmacy interns acting under their supervision if the pharmacy intern is licensed or registered by his or her State board of pharmacy) as qualified persons under section 247d-6d(i)(8)(B) when the pharmacist orders and either the pharmacist or the supervised pharmacy intern administers treatments to individuals ages three through 18 pursuant to the following requirements.

The treatment must be FDA-authorized or FDA-approved. The vaccination must be ordered and administered according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule.[] The licensed pharmacist must complete a practical training program of at least 20 hours that is approved by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). This training Start Printed Page 52139program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of treatments, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to treatments.[] The licensed or registered pharmacy intern must complete a practical training program that is approved by the ACPE. This training program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of treatments, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to treatments.[] The licensed pharmacist and licensed or registered pharmacy intern must have a current certificate in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation.[] The licensed pharmacist must complete a minimum of two hours of ACPE-approved, immunization-related continuing pharmacy education during each State licensing period.[] The licensed pharmacist must comply with recordkeeping and reporting requirements of the jurisdiction in which he or she administers treatments, including informing the patient's primary-care provider when available, submitting the required immunization information to the State or local immunization information system (treatment registry), complying with requirements with respect to reporting adverse events, and complying with requirements whereby the person administering a treatment must review the treatment registry or other vaccination records prior to administering a treatment.[] The licensed pharmacist must inform his or her childhood-vaccination patients and the adult caregivers accompanying the children of the importance of a well-child visit with a pediatrician or other licensed primary-care provider and refer patients as appropriate.[] These requirements are consistent with those in many States that permit licensed pharmacists to order and administer treatments to children and permit licensed or registered pharmacy interns acting under their supervision to administer treatments to children.[] Administering vaccinations to children age three and older is less complicated and requires less training and resources than administering vaccinations to younger children. That is because ACIP generally recommends administering intramuscular injections in the deltoid muscle for individuals age three and older.[] For individuals less than three years of age, ACIP generally recommends administering intramuscular injections in the anterolateral aspect of the thigh muscle.[] Administering injections in the thigh muscle often presents additional complexities and requires additional training and resources including additional personnel to safely position the child while another healthcare professional injects the treatment.[] Moreover, as of 2018, 40% of three-year-olds were enrolled in preprimary programs (i.e.

Preschool or kindergarten programs).[] Preprimary programs are beginning in the coming weeks or months, so the Secretary has concluded that it is particularly important for individuals ages three through 18 to receive ACIP-recommended treatments according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule. All States require children to be vaccinated against certain communicable diseases as a condition of school attendance. These laws often apply to both public and private schools with identical immunization and exemption provisions.[] As nurseries, preschools, kindergartens, and schools reopen, increased access to childhood vaccinations is essential to ensuring children can return. Notwithstanding any State or local scope-of-practice legal requirements, (1) qualified licensed pharmacists are identified as qualified persons to order and administer ACIP-recommended treatments and (2) qualified State-licensed or registered pharmacy interns are identified as qualified persons to administer the ACIP-recommended treatments ordered by their supervising qualified licensed pharmacist.[] Both the PREP Act and the June 4, 2020 Second Amendment to the Declaration define “covered countermeasures” to include qualified viagra and epidemic products that “limit the harm such viagra or epidemic might otherwise cause.” [] The troubling decrease in ACIP-recommended childhood vaccinations and the resulting increased risk of associated diseases, adverse health conditions, and other threats are categories of harms otherwise caused by Start Printed Page 52140erectile dysfunction treatment as set forth in Sections VI and VIII of this Declaration.[] Hence, such vaccinations are “covered countermeasures” under the PREP Act and the June 4, 2020 Second Amendment to the Declaration. Nothing in this Declaration shall be construed to affect the National treatment Injury Compensation Program, including an injured party's ability to obtain compensation under that program.

Covered countermeasures that are subject to the National treatment Injury Compensation Program authorized under 42 U.S.C. 300aa-10 et seq. Are covered under this Declaration for the purposes of liability immunity and injury compensation only to the extent that injury compensation is not provided under that Program. All other terms and conditions of the Declaration apply to such covered countermeasures. Section VIII.

Category of Disease, Health Condition, or Threat As discussed, the troubling decrease in ACIP-recommended childhood vaccinations and the resulting increased risk of associated diseases, adverse health conditions, and other threats are categories of harms otherwise caused by erectile dysfunction treatment. The Secretary therefore amends section VIII, which describes the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures, to clarify that the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures is not only erectile dysfunction treatment caused by erectile dysfunction or a viagra mutating therefrom, but also other diseases, health conditions, or threats that may have been caused by erectile dysfunction treatment, erectile dysfunction, or a viagra mutating therefrom, including the decrease in the rate of childhood immunizations, which will lead to an increase in the rate of infectious diseases. Amendments to Declaration Amended Declaration for Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act Coverage for medical countermeasures against erectile dysfunction treatment. Sections V and VIII of the March 10, 2020 Declaration under the PREP Act for medical countermeasures against erectile dysfunction treatment, as amended April 10, 2020 and June 4, 2020, are further amended pursuant to section 319F-3(b)(4) of the PHS Act as described below. All other sections of the Declaration remain in effect as published at 85 FR 15198 (Mar.

17, 2020) and amended at 85 FR 21012 (Apr. 15, 2020) and 85 FR 35100 (June 8, 2020). 1. Covered Persons, section V, delete in full and replace with. V.

Covered Persons 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d(i)(2), (3), (4), (6), (8)(A) and (B) Covered Persons who are afforded liability immunity under this Declaration are “manufacturers,” “distributors,” “program planners,” “qualified persons,” and their officials, agents, and employees, as those terms are defined in the PREP Act, and the United States. In addition, I have determined that the following additional persons are qualified persons. (a) Any person authorized in accordance with the public health and medical emergency response of the Authority Having Jurisdiction, as described in Section VII below, to prescribe, administer, deliver, distribute or dispense the Covered Countermeasures, and their officials, agents, employees, contractors and volunteers, following a Declaration of an emergency. (b) any person authorized to prescribe, administer, or dispense the Covered Countermeasures or who is otherwise authorized to perform an activity under an Emergency Use Authorization in accordance with Section 564 of the FD&C Act.

(c) any person authorized to prescribe, administer, or dispense Covered Countermeasures in accordance with Section 564A of the FD&C Act. And (d) a State-licensed pharmacist who orders and administers, and pharmacy interns who administer (if the pharmacy intern acts under the supervision of such pharmacist and the pharmacy intern is licensed or registered by his or her State board of pharmacy), treatments that the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends to persons ages three through 18 according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule. Such State-licensed pharmacists and the State-licensed or registered interns under their supervision are qualified persons only if the following requirements are met. The treatment must be FDA-authorized or FDA-approved. The vaccination must be ordered and administered according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule.

The licensed pharmacist must complete a practical training program of at least 20 hours that is approved by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). This training program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of treatments, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to treatments. The licensed or registered pharmacy intern must complete a practical training program that is approved by the ACPE. This training program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of treatments, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to treatments. The licensed pharmacist and licensed or registered pharmacy intern must have a current certificate in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

The licensed pharmacist must complete a minimum of two hours of ACPE-approved, immunization-related continuing pharmacy education during each State licensing period. The licensed pharmacist must comply with recordkeeping and reporting requirements of the jurisdiction in which he or she administers treatments, including informing the patient's primary-care provider when available, submitting the required immunization information to the State or local immunization information system (treatment registry), complying with requirements with respect to reporting adverse events, and complying with requirements whereby the person administering a treatment must review the treatment registry or other vaccination records prior to administering a treatment. The licensed pharmacist must inform his or her childhood-vaccination patients and the adult caregiver accompanying the child of the importance of a well-child visit with a pediatrician or other licensed primary-care provider and refer patients as appropriate. Nothing in this Declaration shall be construed to affect the National treatment Injury Compensation Program, including an injured party's ability to obtain compensation under that program. Covered countermeasures that are subject to the National treatment Injury Compensation Program authorized under 42 U.S.C.

300aa-10 et seq. Are covered under this Declaration for the purposes of liability immunity and injury compensation only to the extent that injury compensation is not provided under that Program. All other Start Printed Page 52141terms and conditions of the Declaration apply to such covered countermeasures. 2. Category of Disease, Health Condition, or Threat, section VIII, delete in full and replace with.

VIII. Category of Disease, Health Condition, or Threat 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d(b)(2)(A) The category of disease, health condition, or threat for which I recommend the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures is not only erectile dysfunction treatment caused by erectile dysfunction or a viagra mutating therefrom, but also other diseases, health conditions, or threats that may have been caused by erectile dysfunction treatment, erectile dysfunction, or a viagra mutating therefrom, including the decrease in the rate of childhood immunizations, which will lead to an increase in the rate of infectious diseases. Start Authority 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d.

End Authority Start Signature Dated. August 19, 2020. Alex M. Azar II, Secretary of Health and Human Services. End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc.

2020-18542 Filed 8-20-20. 4:15 pm]BILLING CODE 4150-03-P.

Specificity of erectile dysfunction Antibody my explanation Assays Both assays measuring pan-Ig antibodies had low numbers how to buy cheap viagra of false positives among samples collected in 2017. There were 0 and 1 false positives for the two assays among 472 samples, results that compared favorably with those obtained with the single IgM anti-N and IgG anti-N assays (Table how to buy cheap viagra S3). Because of the low prevalence of erectile dysfunction in Iceland, we required positive results from both pan-Ig antibody assays for a sample to be considered seropositive (see Supplementary Methods in Supplementary Appendix 1). None of the samples collected in early 2020 group were seropositive, which indicates that the viagra had how to buy cheap viagra not spread widely in Iceland before February 2020.

erectile dysfunction Antibodies among qPCR-Positive Persons Figure 2. Figure 2 how to buy cheap viagra. Antibody Prevalence and Titers among qPCR-Positive Cases as a Function of Time since Diagnosis by qPCR. Shown are the percentages of samples positive for both pan-Ig antibody assays and the antibody how to buy cheap viagra titers.

Red denotes the count or percentage of samples among persons during their hospitalization (249 samples from 48 persons), and blue denotes the count or percentage of samples among persons after they were declared recovered (1853 samples from 1215 persons). Vertical bars how to buy cheap viagra denote 95% confidence intervals. The dashed lines indicated the thresholds for a test to be declared positive. OD denotes optical how to buy cheap viagra density, and RBD receptor binding domain.Table 1.

Table 1. Prevalence of erectile dysfunction Antibodies by Sample Collection as Measured by Two how to buy cheap viagra Pan-Ig Antibody Assays. Twenty-five days after diagnosis how to buy cheap viagra by qPCR, more than 90% of samples from recovered persons tested positive with both pan-Ig antibody assays, and the percentage of persons testing positive remained stable thereafter (Figure 2 and Fig. S2).

Hospitalized persons seroconverted more frequently and quickly after qPCR diagnosis than did nonhospitalized persons (Figure 2 and how to buy cheap viagra Fig. S3). Of 1215 persons how to buy cheap viagra who had recovered (on the basis of results for the most recently obtained sample from persons for whom we had multiple samples), 1107 were seropositive (91.1%. 95% confidence interval [CI], 89.4 to 92.6) (Table 1 and Table S4).

Since some diagnoses may have been made on the basis of false positive qPCR results, we determined that how to buy cheap viagra 91.1% represents the lower bound of sensitivity of the combined pan-Ig tests for the detection of erectile dysfunction antibodies among recovered persons. Table 2. Table 2 how to buy cheap viagra. Results of Repeated Pan-Ig Antibody Tests among Recovered qPCR-Diagnosed Persons.

Among the 487 how to buy cheap viagra recovered persons with two or more samples, 19 (4%) had different pan-Ig antibody test results at different time points (Table 2 and Fig. S4). It is notable that of the 22 persons with how to buy cheap viagra an early sample that tested negative for both pan-Ig antibodies, 19 remained negative at the most recent test date (again, for both antibodies). One person tested positive for both pan-Ig antibodies in the first test and negative for both in the most recent test.

The longitudinal changes in antibody levels among recovered persons were consistent with the cross-sectional results how to buy cheap viagra (Fig. S5). Antibody levels were higher in the last sample than in the first sample when the antibodies were measured with the two pan-Ig assays, slightly lower than in the first sample when measured with IgG anti-N and IgG anti-S1 assays, and substantially lower than in the first sample when measured with IgM anti-N and IgA anti-S1 assays. IgG anti-N, IgM anti-N, IgG anti-S1, and IgA anti-S1 antibody levels were correlated among the qPCR-positive persons (Figs.

S5 and S6 and Table S5). Antibody levels measured with both pan-Ig antibody assays increased over the first 2 months after qPCR diagnosis and remained at a plateau over the next 2 months of the study. IgM anti-N antibody levels increased rapidly soon after diagnosis and then fell rapidly and were generally not detected after 2 months. IgA anti-S1 antibodies decreased 1 month after diagnosis and remained detectable thereafter.

IgG anti-N and anti-S1 antibody levels increased during the first 6 weeks after diagnosis and then decreased slightly. erectile dysfunction in Quarantine Table 3. Table 3. erectile dysfunction among Quarantined Persons According to Exposure Type and Presence of Symptoms.

Of the 1797 qPCR-positive Icelanders, 1088 (61%) were in quarantine when erectile dysfunction was diagnosed by qPCR. We tested for antibodies among 4222 quarantined persons who had not tested qPCR-positive (they had received a negative result by qPCR or had simply not been tested). Of those 4222 quarantined persons, 97 (2.3%. 95% CI, 1.9 to 2.8) were seropositive (Table 1).

Those with household exposure were 5.2 (95% CI, 3.3 to 8.0) times more likely to be seropositive than those with other types of exposure (Table 3). Similarly, a positive result by qPCR for those with household exposure was 5.2 (95% CI, 4.5 to 6.1) times more likely than for those with other types of exposure. When these two sets of results (qPCR-positive and seropositive) were combined, we calculated that 26.6% of quarantined persons with household exposure and 5.0% of quarantined persons without household exposure were infected. Those who had symptoms during quarantine were 3.2 (95% CI, 1.7 to 6.2) times more likely to be seropositive and 18.2 times (95% CI, 14.8 to 22.4) more likely to test positive with qPCR than those without symptoms.

We also tested persons in two regions of Iceland affected by cluster outbreaks. In a erectile dysfunction cluster in Vestfirdir, 1.4% of residents were qPCR-positive and 10% of residents were quarantined. We found that none of the 326 persons outside quarantine who had not been tested by qPCR (or who tested negative) were seropositive. In a cluster in Vestmannaeyjar, 2.3% of residents were qPCR-positive and 13% of residents were quarantined.

Of the 447 quarantined persons who had not received a qPCR-positive result, 4 were seropositive (0.9%. 95% CI, 0.3 to 2.1). Of the 663 outside quarantine in Vestmannaeyjar, 3 were seropositive (0.5%. 95% CI, 0.1 to 0.2%).

erectile dysfunction Seroprevalence in Iceland None of the serum samples collected from 470 healthy Icelanders between February 18 and March 9, 2020, tested positive for both pan-Ig antibodies, although four were positive for the pan-Ig anti-N assay (0.9%), a finding that suggests that the viagra had not spread widely in Iceland before March 9. Of the 18,609 persons tested for erectile dysfunction antibodies through contact with the Icelandic health care system for reasons other than erectile dysfunction treatment, 39 were positive for both pan-Ig antibody assays (estimated seroprevalence by weighting the sample on the basis of residence, sex, and 10-year age category, 0.3%. 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4). There were regional differences in the percentages of qPCR-positive persons across Iceland that were roughly proportional to the percentage of people quarantined (Table S6).

However, after exclusion of the qPCR-positive and quarantined persons, the percentage of persons who tested positive for erectile dysfunction antibodies did not correlate with the percentage of those who tested positive by qPCR. The estimated seroprevalence in the random sample collection from Reykjavik (0.4%. 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.6) was similar to that in the Health Care group (0.3%. 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4) (Table S6).

We calculate that 0.5% of the residents of Iceland have tested positive with qPCR. The 2.3% with erectile dysfunction seroconversion among persons in quarantine extrapolates to 0.1% of Icelandic residents. On the basis of this finding and the seroprevalence from the Health Care group, we estimate that 0.9% (95% CI, 0.8 to 0.9) of the population of Iceland has been infected by erectile dysfunction. Approximately 56% of all erectile dysfunction s were therefore diagnosed by qPCR, 14% occurred in quarantine without having been diagnosed with qPCR, and the remaining 30% of s occurred outside quarantine and were not detected by qPCR.

Deaths from erectile dysfunction treatment in Iceland In Iceland, 10 deaths have been attributed to erectile dysfunction treatment, which corresponds to 3 deaths per 100,000 nationwide. Among the qPCR-positive cases, 0.6% (95% CI, 0.3 to 1.0) were fatal. Using the 0.9% prevalence of erectile dysfunction in Iceland as the denominator, however, we calculate an fatality risk of 0.3% (95% CI, 0.2 to 0.6). Stratified by age, the fatality risk was substantially lower in those 70 years old or younger (0.1%.

95% CI, 0.0 to 0.3) than in those over 70 years of age (4.4%. 95% CI, 1.9 to 8.4) (Table S7). Age, Sex, Clinical Characteristics, and Antibody Levels Table 4. Table 4.

Association of Existing Conditions and erectile dysfunction treatment Severity with erectile dysfunction Antibody Levels among Recovered Persons. erectile dysfunction antibody levels were higher in older people and in those who were hospitalized (Table 4, and Table S8 [described in Supplementary Appendix 1 and available in Supplementary Appendix 2]). Pan-Ig anti–S1-RBD and IgA anti-S1 levels were lower in female persons. Of the preexisting conditions, and after adjustment for multiple testing, we found that body-mass index, smoking status, and use of antiinflammatory medication were associated with erectile dysfunction antibody levels.

Body-mass index correlated positively with antibody levels. Smokers and users of antiinflammatory medication had lower antibody levels. With respect to clinical characteristics, antibody levels were most strongly associated with hospitalization and clinical severity, followed by clinical symptoms such as fever, maximum temperature reading, cough, and loss of appetite. Severity of these individual symptoms, with the exception of loss of energy, was associated with higher antibody levels.To the Editor.

Rapid and accurate diagnostic tests are essential for controlling the ongoing erectile dysfunction treatment viagra. Although the current standard involves testing of nasopharyngeal swab specimens by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) to detect erectile dysfunction, saliva specimens may be an alternative diagnostic sample.1-4 Rigorous evaluation is needed to determine how saliva specimens compare with nasopharyngeal swab specimens with respect to sensitivity in detection of erectile dysfunction during the course of . A total of 70 inpatients with erectile dysfunction treatment provided written informed consent to participate in our study (see the Methods section in Supplementary Appendix 1, available with the full text of this letter at NEJM.org). After erectile dysfunction treatment was confirmed with a positive nasopharyngeal swab specimen at hospital admission, we obtained additional samples from the patients during hospitalization.

We tested saliva specimens collected by the patients themselves and nasopharyngeal swabs collected from the patients at the same time point by health care workers. Figure 1. Figure 1. erectile dysfunction RNA Titers in Saliva Specimens and Nasopharyngeal Swab Specimens.

Samples were obtained from 70 hospital inpatients who had a diagnosis of erectile dysfunction treatment. Panel A shows erectile dysfunction RNA titers in the first available nasopharyngeal and saliva samples. The lines indicate samples from the same patient. Results were compared with the use of a Wilcoxon signed-rank test (P<0.001).

Panel B shows percentages of positivity for erectile dysfunction in tests of the first matched nasopharyngeal and saliva samples at 1 to 5 days, 6 to 10 days, and 11 or more days (maximum, 53 days) after the diagnosis of erectile dysfunction treatment. Panel C shows longitudinal erectile dysfunction RNA copies per milliliter in 97 saliva samples, according to days since symptom onset. Each circle represents a separate sample. Dashed lines indicate additional samples from the same patient.

The red line indicates a negative saliva sample that was followed by a positive sample at the next collection of a specimen. Panel D shows longitudinal erectile dysfunction RNA copies per milliliter in 97 nasopharyngeal swab specimens, according to days since symptom onset. The red lines indicate negative nasopharyngeal swab specimens there were followed by a positive swab at the next collection of a specimen. The gray area in Panels C and D indicates samples that were below the lower limit of detection of 5610 viagra RNA copies per milliliter of sample, which is at cycle threshold 38 of our quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay targeting the erectile dysfunction N1 sequence recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

To analyze these data, we used a linear mixed-effects regression model (see Supplementary Appendix 1) that accounts for the correlation between samples collected from the same person at a single time point (i.e., multivariate response) and the correlation between samples collected across time from the same patient (i.e., repeated measures). All the data used to generate this figure, including the raw cycle thresholds, are provided in Supplementary Data 1 in Supplementary Appendix 2.Using primer sequences from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we detected more erectile dysfunction RNA copies in the saliva specimens (mean log copies per milliliter, 5.58. 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.09 to 6.07) than in the nasopharyngeal swab specimens (mean log copies per milliliter, 4.93. 95% CI, 4.53 to 5.33) (Figure 1A, and Fig.

S1 in Supplementary Appendix 1). In addition, a higher percentage of saliva samples than nasopharyngeal swab samples were positive up to 10 days after the erectile dysfunction treatment diagnosis (Figure 1B). At 1 to 5 days after diagnosis, 81% (95% CI, 71 to 96) of the saliva samples were positive, as compared with 71% (95% CI, 67 to 94) of the nasopharyngeal swab specimens. These findings suggest that saliva specimens and nasopharyngeal swab specimens have at least similar sensitivity in the detection of erectile dysfunction during the course of hospitalization.

Because the results of testing of nasopharyngeal swab specimens to detect erectile dysfunction may vary with repeated sampling in individual patients,5 we evaluated viral detection in matched samples over time. The level of erectile dysfunction RNA decreased after symptom onset in both saliva specimens (estimated slope, −0.11. 95% credible interval, −0.15 to −0.06) (Figure 1C) and nasopharyngeal swab specimens (estimated slope, −0.09. 95% credible interval, −0.13 to −0.05) (Figure 1D).

In three instances, a negative nasopharyngeal swab specimen was followed by a positive swab at the next collection of a specimen (Figure 1D). This phenomenon occurred only once with the saliva specimens (Figure 1C). During the clinical course, we observed less variation in levels of erectile dysfunction RNA in the saliva specimens (standard deviation, 0.98 viagra RNA copies per milliliter. 95% credible interval, 0.08 to 1.98) than in the nasopharyngeal swab specimens (standard deviation, 2.01 viagra RNA copies per milliliter.

95% credible interval, 1.29 to 2.70) (see Supplementary Appendix 1). Recent studies have shown that erectile dysfunction can be detected in the saliva of asymptomatic persons and outpatients.1-3 We therefore screened 495 asymptomatic health care workers who provided written informed consent to participate in our prospective study, and we used RT-qPCR to test both saliva and nasopharyngeal samples obtained from these persons. We detected erectile dysfunction RNA in saliva specimens obtained from 13 persons who did not report any symptoms at or before the time of sample collection. Of these 13 health care workers, 9 had collected matched nasopharyngeal swab specimens by themselves on the same day, and 7 of these specimens tested negative (Fig.

S2). The diagnosis in the 13 health care workers with positive saliva specimens was later confirmed in diagnostic testing of additional nasopharyngeal samples by a CLIA (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988)–certified laboratory. Variation in nasopharyngeal sampling may be an explanation for false negative results, so monitoring an internal control for proper sample collection may provide an alternative evaluation technique. In specimens collected from inpatients by health care workers, we found greater variation in human RNase P cycle threshold (Ct) values in nasopharyngeal swab specimens (standard deviation, 2.89 Ct.

95% CI, 26.53 to 27.69) than in saliva specimens (standard deviation, 2.49 Ct. 95% CI, 23.35 to 24.35). When health care workers collected their own specimens, we also found greater variation in RNase P Ct values in nasopharyngeal swab specimens (standard deviation, 2.26 Ct. 95% CI, 28.39 to 28.56) than in saliva specimens (standard deviation , 1.65 Ct.

95% CI, 24.14 to 24.26) (Fig. S3). Collection of saliva samples by patients themselves negates the need for direct interaction between health care workers and patients. This interaction is a source of major testing bottlenecks and presents a risk of nosocomial .

Collection of saliva samples by patients themselves also alleviates demands for supplies of swabs and personal protective equipment. Given the growing need for testing, our findings provide support for the potential of saliva specimens in the diagnosis of erectile dysfunction . Anne L. Wyllie, Ph.D.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT [email protected]John Fournier, M.D.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTArnau Casanovas-Massana, Ph.D.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTMelissa Campbell, M.D.Maria Tokuyama, Ph.D.Pavithra Vijayakumar, B.A.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTJoshua L.

Warren, Ph.D.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTBertie Geng, M.D.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTM. Catherine Muenker, M.S.Adam J. Moore, M.P.H.Chantal B.F. Vogels, Ph.D.Mary E.

Petrone, B.S.Isabel M. Ott, B.S.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTPeiwen Lu, Ph.D.Arvind Venkataraman, B.S.Alice Lu-Culligan, B.S.Jonathan Klein, B.S.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTRebecca Earnest, M.P.H.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTMichael Simonov, M.D.Rupak Datta, M.D., Ph.D.Ryan Handoko, M.D.Nida Naushad, B.S.Lorenzo R. Sewanan, M.Phil.Jordan Valdez, B.S.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTElizabeth B. White, A.B.Sarah Lapidus, M.S.Chaney C.

Kalinich, M.P.H.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTXiaodong Jiang, M.D., Ph.D.Daniel J. Kim, A.B.Eriko Kudo, Ph.D.Melissa Linehan, M.S.Tianyang Mao, B.S.Miyu Moriyama, Ph.D.Ji E. Oh, M.D., Ph.D.Annsea Park, B.A.Julio Silva, B.S.Eric Song, M.S.Takehiro Takahashi, M.D., Ph.D.Manabu Taura, Ph.D.Orr-El Weizman, B.A.Patrick Wong, M.S.Yexin Yang, B.S.Santos Bermejo, B.S.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTCamila D. Odio, M.D.Yale New Haven Health, New Haven, CTSaad B.

Omer, M.B., B.S., Ph.D.Yale Institute for Global Health, New Haven, CTCharles S. Dela Cruz, M.D., Ph.D.Shelli Farhadian, M.D., Ph.D.Richard A. Martinello, M.D.Akiko Iwasaki, Ph.D.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTNathan D. Grubaugh, Ph.D.Albert I.

Ko, M.D.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT [email protected], [email protected] Supported by the Huffman Family Donor Advised Fund, a Fast Grant from Emergent Ventures at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, the Yale Institute for Global Health, the Yale School of Medicine, a grant (U19 AI08992, to Dr. Ko) from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the Beatrice Kleinberg Neuwirth Fund, and a grant (Rubicon 019.181EN.004, to Dr. Vogel) from the Dutch Research Council (NWO). Disclosure forms provided by the authors are available with the full text of this letter at NEJM.org.

This letter was published on August 28, 2020, at NEJM.org. Drs. Grubaugh and Ko contributed equally to this letter. 5 References1.

Kojima N, Turner F, Slepnev V, et al. Self-collected oral fluid and nasal swabs demonstrate comparable sensitivity to clinician collected nasopharyngeal swabs for erectile dysfunction treatment detection. April 15, 2020 (https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.04.11.20062372v1). Preprint.Google Scholar2.

Williams E, Bond K, Zhang B, Putland M, Williamson DA. Saliva as a non-invasive specimen for detection of erectile dysfunction. J Clin Microbiol 2020;58(8):e00776-20-e00776-20.3. Pasomsub E, Watcharananan SP, Boonyawat K, et al.

Saliva sample as a non-invasive specimen for the diagnosis of erectile dysfunction disease 2019. A cross-sectional study. Clin Microbiol Infect 2020 May 15 (Epub ahead of print).4. Vogels CBF, Brackney D, Wang J, et al.

SalivaDirect. Simple and sensitive molecular diagnostic test for erectile dysfunction surveillance. August 4, 2020 (https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.08.03.20167791v1). Preprint.Google Scholar5.

Zou L, Ruan F, Huang M, et al. erectile dysfunction viral load in upper respiratory specimens of infected patients. N Engl J Med 2020;382:1177-1179.Trial Population Table 1. Table 1.

Demographic Characteristics of the Participants in the NVX-CoV2373 Trial at Enrollment. The trial was initiated on May 26, 2020. 134 participants underwent randomization between May 27 and June 6, 2020, including 3 participants who were to serve as backups for sentinel dosing and who immediately withdrew from the trial without being vaccinated (Fig. S1).

Of the 131 participants who received injections, 23 received placebo (group A), 25 received 25-μg doses of rerectile dysfunction (group B), 29 received 5-μg doses of rerectile dysfunction plus Matrix-M1, including three sentinels (group C), 28 received 25-μg doses of rerectile dysfunction plus Matrix-M1, including three sentinels (group D), and 26 received a single 25-μg dose of rerectile dysfunction plus Matrix-M1 followed by a single dose of placebo (group E). All 131 participants received their first vaccination on day 0, and all but 3 received their second vaccination at least 21 days later. Exceptions include 2 in the placebo group (group A) who withdrew consent (unrelated to any adverse event) and 1 in the 25-μg rerectile dysfunction + Matrix-M1 group (group D) who had an unsolicited adverse event (mild cellulitis. See below).

Demographic characteristics of the participants are presented in Table 1. Of note, missing data were infrequent. Safety Outcomes No serious adverse events or adverse events of special interest were reported, and vaccination pause rules were not implemented. As noted above, one participant did not receive a second vaccination owing to an unsolicited adverse event, mild cellulitis, that was associated with after an intravenous cannula placement to address an unrelated mild adverse event that occurred during the second week of follow-up.

Second vaccination was withheld because the participant was still recovering and receiving antibiotics. This participant remains in the trial. Figure 2. Figure 2.

Solicited Local and Systemic Adverse Events. The percentage of participants in each treatment group (groups A, B, C, D, and E) with adverse events according to the maximum FDA toxicity grade (mild, moderate, or severe) during the 7 days after each vaccination is plotted for solicited local (Panel A) and systemic (Panel B) adverse events. There were no grade 4 (life-threatening) events. Participants who reported 0 events make up the remainder of the 100% calculation (not displayed).

Excluded were the three sentinel participants in groups C (5 μg + Matrix-M1, 5 μg + Matrix-M1) and D (25 μg + Matrix-M1, 25 μg + Matrix-M1), who received the trial treatment in an open-label manner (see Table S7 for complete safety data on all participants).Overall reactogenicity was largely absent or mild, and second vaccinations were neither withheld nor delayed due to reactogenicity. After the first vaccination, local and systemic reactogenicity was absent or mild in the majority of participants (local. 100%, 96%, 89%, 84%, and 88% of participants in groups A, B, C, D, and E, respectively. Systemic.

91%, 92%, 96%, 68%, and 89%) who were unaware of treatment assignment (Figure 2 and Table S7). Two participants (2%), one each in groups D and E, had severe adverse events (headache, fatigue, and malaise). Two participants, one each in groups A and E, had reactogenicity events (fatigue, malaise, and tenderness) that extended 2 days after day 7. After the second vaccination, local and systemic reactogenicity were absent or mild in the majority of participants in the five groups (local.

100%, 100%, 65%, 67%, and 100% of participants, respectively. Systemic. 86%, 84%, 73%, 58%, and 96%) who were unaware of treatment assignment. One participant, in group D, had a severe local event (tenderness), and eight participants, one or two participants in each group, had severe systemic events.

The most common severe systemic events were joint pain and fatigue. Only one participant, in group D, had fever (temperature, 38.1°C) after the second vaccination, on day 1 only. No adverse event extended beyond 7 days after the second vaccination. Of note, the mean duration of reactogenicity events was 2 days or less for both the first vaccination and second vaccination periods.

Laboratory abnormalities of grade 2 or higher occurred in 13 participants (10%). 9 after the first vaccination and 4 after the second vaccination (Table S8). Abnormal laboratory values were not associated with any clinical manifestations and showed no worsening with repeat vaccination. Six participants (5%.

Five women and one man) had grade 2 or higher transient reductions in hemoglobin from baseline, with no evidence of hemolysis or microcytic anemia and with resolution within 7 to 21 days. Of the six, two had an absolute hemoglobin value (grade 2) that resolved or stabilized during the testing period. Four participants (3%), including one who had received placebo, had elevated liver enzymes that were noted after the first vaccination and resolved within 7 to 14 days (i.e., before the second vaccination). Vital signs remained stable immediately after vaccination and at all visits.

Unsolicited adverse events (Table S9) were predominantly mild in severity (in 71%, 91%, 83%, 90%, and 82% of participants in groups A, B, C, D, and E, respectively) and were similarly distributed across the groups receiving adjuvanted and unadjuvanted treatment. There were no reports of severe adverse events. Immunogenicity Outcomes Figure 3. Figure 3.

erectile dysfunction Anti-Spike IgG and Neutralizing Antibody Responses. Shown are geometric mean anti-spike IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) unit responses to recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome erectile dysfunction 2 (rerectile dysfunction) protein antigens (Panel A) and wild-type erectile dysfunction microneutralization assay at an inhibitory concentration greater than 99% (MN IC>99%) titer responses (Panel B) at baseline (day 0), 3 weeks after the first vaccination (day 21), and 2 weeks after the second vaccination (day 35) for the placebo group (group A), the 25-μg unadjuvanted group (group B), the 5-μg and 25-μg adjuvanted groups (groups C and D, respectively), and the 25-μg adjuvanted and placebo group (group E). Diamonds and whisker endpoints represent geometric mean titer values and 95% confidence intervals, respectively. The erectile dysfunction treatment human convalescent serum panel includes specimens from PCR-confirmed erectile dysfunction treatment participants, obtained from Baylor College of Medicine (29 specimens for ELISA and 32 specimens for MN IC>99%), with geometric mean titer values according to erectile dysfunction treatment severity.

The severity of erectile dysfunction treatment is indicated by the colors of the dots for hospitalized patients (including those in intensive care), symptomatic outpatients (with samples collected in the emergency department), and asymptomatic patients who had been exposed to erectile dysfunction treatment (with samples collected during contact and exposure assessment). Mean values (in black) for human convalescent serum are depicted next to (and of same color as) the category of erectile dysfunction treatment patients, with the overall mean shown above the scatter plot (in black). For each trial treatment group, the mean at day 35 is depicted above the scatterplot.ELISA anti-spike IgG geometric mean ELISA units (GMEUs) ranged from 105 to 116 at day 0. By day 21, responses had occurred for all adjuvanted regimens (1984, 2626, and 3317 GMEUs for groups C, D, and E, respectively), and geometric mean fold rises (GMFRs) exceeded those induced without adjuvant by a factor of at least 10 (Figure 3 and Table S10).

Within 7 days after the second vaccination with adjuvant (day 28. Groups C and D), GMEUs had further increased by a factor of 8 (to 15,319 and 20,429, respectively) over responses seen with the first vaccination, and within 14 days (day 35), responses had more than doubled yet again (to 63,160 and 47,521, respectively), achieving GMFRs that were approximately 100 times greater than those observed with rerectile dysfunction alone. A single vaccination with adjuvant achieved GMEU levels similar to those in asymptomatic (exposed) patients with erectile dysfunction treatment (1661), and a second vaccination with adjuvant achieved GMEU levels that exceeded those in convalescent serum from symptomatic outpatients with erectile dysfunction treatment (7420) by a factor of at least 6 and rose to levels similar to those in convalescent serum from patients hospitalized with erectile dysfunction treatment (53,391). The responses in the two-dose 5-μg and 25-μg adjuvanted treatment regimens were similar, a finding that highlights the role of adjuvant dose sparing.

Neutralizing antibodies were undetectable before vaccination and had patterns of response similar to those of anti-spike antibodies after vaccination with adjuvant (Figure 3 and Table S11). After the first vaccination (day 21), GMFRs were approximately 5 times greater with adjuvant (5.2, 6.3, and 5.9 for groups C, D, and E, respectively) than without adjuvant (1.1). By day 35, second vaccinations with adjuvant induced an increase more than 100 times greater (195 and 165 for groups C and D, respectively) than single vaccinations without adjuvant. When compared with convalescent serum, second vaccinations with adjuvant resulted in GMT levels approximately 4 times greater (3906 and 3305 for groups C and D, respectively) than those in symptomatic outpatients with erectile dysfunction treatment (837) and approached the magnitude of levels observed in hospitalized patients with erectile dysfunction treatment (7457).

At day 35, ELISA anti-spike IgG GMEUs and neutralizing antibodies induced by the two-dose 5-μg and 25-μg adjuvanted treatment regimens were 4 to 6 times greater than the geometric mean convalescent serum measures (8344 and 983, respectively). Figure 4. Figure 4. Correlation of Anti-Spike IgG and Neutralizing Antibody Responses.

Shown are scatter plots of 100% wild-type neutralizing antibody responses and anti-spike IgG ELISA unit responses at 3 weeks after the first vaccination (day 21) and 2 weeks after the second vaccination (day 35) for the two-dose 25-μg unadjuvanted treatment (group B. Panel A), the combined two-dose 5-μg and 25-μg adjuvanted treatment (groups C and D, respectively. Panel B), and convalescent serum from patients with erectile dysfunction treatment (Panel C). In Panel C, the severity of erectile dysfunction treatment is indicated by the colors of the dots for hospitalized patients (including those in intensive care), symptomatic outpatients (with samples collected in the emergency department), and asymptomatic patients who had been exposed to erectile dysfunction treatment (with samples collected during contact and exposure assessment).A strong correlation was observed between neutralizing antibody titers and anti-spike IgG GMEUs with adjuvanted treatment at day 35 (correlation, 0.95) (Figure 4), a finding that was not observed with unadjuvanted treatment (correlation, 0.76) but was similar to that of convalescent serum (correlation, 0.96).

Two-dose regimens of 5-μg and 25-μg rerectile dysfunction plus Matrix-M1 produced similar magnitudes of response, and every participant had seroconversion according to either assay measurement. Reverse cumulative-distribution curves for day 35 are presented in Figure S2. Figure 5. Figure 5.

Rerectile dysfunction CD4+ T-cell Responses with or without Matrix-M1 Adjuvant. Frequencies of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells producing T helper 1 (Th1) cytokines interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-2 and for T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines interleukin-5 and interleukin-13 indicated cytokines from four participants each in the placebo (group A), 25-μg unadjuvanted (group B), 5-μg adjuvanted (group C), and 25-μg adjuvanted (group D) groups at baseline (day 0) and 1 week after the second vaccination (day 28) after stimulation with the recombinant spike protein. €œAny 2Th1” indicates CD4+ T cells that can produce two types of Th1 cytokines at the same time. €œAll 3 Th1” indicates CD4+ T cells that produce IFN-γ, TNF-α, and interleukin-2 simultaneously.

€œBoth Th2” indicates CD4+ T cells that can produce Th2 cytokines interleukin-5 and interleukin-13 at the same time.T-cell responses in 16 participants who were randomly selected from groups A through D, 4 participants per group, showed that adjuvanted regimens induced antigen-specific polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses that were reflected in IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α production on spike protein stimulation. A strong bias toward this Th1 phenotype was noted. Th2 responses (as measured by IL-5 and IL-13 cytokines) were minimal (Figure 5).Start Preamble Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS.

Extension of timeline for publication of final rule. This notice announces an extension of the timeline for publication of a Medicare final rule in accordance with the Social Security Act, which allows us to extend the timeline for publication of the final rule. As of August 26, 2020, the timeline for publication of the final rule to finalize the provisions of the October 17, 2019 proposed rule (84 FR 55766) is extended until August 31, 2021. Start Further Info Lisa O.

Wilson, (410) 786-8852. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information In the October 17, 2019 Federal Register (84 FR 55766), we published a proposed rule that addressed undue regulatory impact and burden of the physician self-referral law. The proposed rule was issued in conjunction with the Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services' (CMS) Patients over Paperwork initiative and the Department of Health and Human Services' (the Department or HHS) Regulatory Sprint to Coordinated Care.

In the proposed rule, we proposed exceptions to the physician self-referral law for certain value-based compensation arrangements between or among physicians, providers, and suppliers. A new exception for certain arrangements under which a physician receives limited remuneration for items or services actually provided by the physician. A new exception for donations of cybersecurity technology and related services. And amendments to the existing exception for electronic health records (EHR) items and services.

The proposed rule also provides critically necessary guidance for physicians and health care providers and suppliers whose financial relationships are governed by the physician self-referral statute and regulations. This notice announces an extension of the timeline for publication of the final rule and the continuation of effectiveness of the proposed rule. Section 1871(a)(3)(A) of the Social Security Act (the Act) requires us to establish and publish a regular timeline for the publication of final regulations based on the previous publication of a proposed regulation. In accordance with section 1871(a)(3)(B) of the Act, the timeline may vary among different regulations based on differences in the complexity of the regulation, the number and scope of comments received, and other relevant factors, but may not be longer than 3 years except under exceptional circumstances.

In addition, in accordance with section 1871(a)(3)(B) of the Act, the Secretary may extend the initial targeted publication date of the final regulation if the Secretary, no later than the regulation's previously established proposed publication date, publishes a notice with the new target date, and such notice includes a brief explanation of the justification for the variation. We announced in the Spring 2020 Unified Agenda (June 30, 2020, www.reginfo.gov) that we would issue the final rule in August 2020. However, we are still working through the Start Printed Page 52941complexity of the issues raised by comments received on the proposed rule and therefore we are not able to meet the announced publication target date. This notice extends the timeline for publication of the final rule until August 31, 2021.

Start Signature Dated. August 24, 2020. Wilma M. Robinson, Deputy Executive Secretary to the Department, Department of Health and Human Services.

End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2020-18867 Filed 8-26-20. 8:45 am]BILLING CODE 4120-01-PStart Preamble Notice of amendment. The Secretary issues this amendment pursuant to section 319F-3 of the Public Health Service Act to add additional categories of Qualified Persons and amend the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures.

This amendment to the Declaration published on March 17, 2020 (85 FR 15198) is effective as of August 24, 2020. Start Further Info Robert P. Kadlec, MD, MTM&H, MS, Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Office of the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20201. Telephone.

202-205-2882. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information The Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act (PREP Act) authorizes the Secretary of Health and Human Services (the Secretary) to issue a Declaration to provide liability immunity to certain individuals and entities (Covered Persons) against any claim of loss caused by, arising out of, relating to, or resulting from the manufacture, distribution, administration, or use of medical countermeasures (Covered Countermeasures), except for claims involving “willful misconduct” as defined in the PREP Act. Under the PREP Act, a Declaration may be amended as circumstances warrant. The PREP Act was enacted on December 30, 2005, as Public Law 109-148, Division C, § 2.

It amended the Public Health Service (PHS) Act, adding section 319F-3, which addresses liability immunity, and section 319F-4, which creates a compensation program. These sections are codified at 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d and 42 U.S.C. 247d-6e, respectively.

Section 319F-3 of the PHS Act has been amended by the viagra and All-Hazards Preparedness Reauthorization Act (PAHPRA), Public Law 113-5, enacted on March 13, 2013 and the erectile dysfunction Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, Public Law 116-136, enacted on March 27, Start Printed Page 521372020, to expand Covered Countermeasures under the PREP Act. On January 31, 2020, the Secretary declared a public health emergency pursuant to section 319 of the PHS Act, 42 U.S.C. 247d, effective January 27, 2020, for the entire United States to aid in the response of the nation's health care community to the erectile dysfunction treatment outbreak. Pursuant to section 319 of the PHS Act, the Secretary renewed that declaration on April 26, 2020, and July 25, 2020.

On March 10, 2020, the Secretary issued a Declaration under the PREP Act for medical countermeasures against erectile dysfunction treatment (85 FR 15198, Mar. 17, 2020) (the Declaration). On April 10, the Secretary amended the Declaration under the PREP Act to extend liability immunity to covered countermeasures authorized under the CARES Act (85 FR 21012, Apr. 15, 2020).

On June 4, the Secretary amended the Declaration to clarify that covered countermeasures under the Declaration include qualified countermeasures that limit the harm erectile dysfunction treatment might otherwise cause. The Secretary now amends section V of the Declaration to identify as qualified persons covered under the PREP Act, and thus authorizes, certain State-licensed pharmacists to order and administer, and pharmacy interns (who are licensed or registered by their State board of pharmacy and acting under the supervision of a State-licensed pharmacist) to administer, any treatment that the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends to persons ages three through 18 according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule (ACIP-recommended treatments).[] The Secretary also amends section VIII of the Declaration to clarify that the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures includes not only erectile dysfunction treatment caused by erectile dysfunction or a viagra mutating therefrom, but also other diseases, health conditions, or threats that may have been caused by erectile dysfunction treatment, erectile dysfunction, or a viagra mutating therefrom, including the decrease in the rate of childhood immunizations, which will lead to an increase in the rate of infectious diseases. Description of This Amendment by Section Section V. Covered Persons Under the PREP Act and the Declaration, a “qualified person” is a “covered person.” Subject to certain limitations, a covered person is immune from suit and liability under Federal and State law with respect to all claims for loss caused by, arising out of, relating to, or resulting from the administration or use of a covered countermeasure if a declaration under subsection (b) has been issued with respect to such countermeasure.

€œQualified person” includes (A) a licensed health professional or other individual who is authorized to prescribe, administer, or dispense such countermeasures under the law of the State in which the countermeasure was prescribed, administered, or dispensed. Or (B) “a person within a category of persons so identified in a declaration by the Secretary” under subsection (b) of the PREP Act. 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d(i)(8).[] By this amendment to the Declaration, the Secretary identifies an additional category of persons who are qualified persons under section 247d-6d(i)(8)(B).[] On May 8, 2020, CDC reported, “The identified declines in routine pediatric treatment ordering and doses administered might indicate that U.S.

Children and their communities face increased risks for outbreaks of treatment-preventable diseases,” and suggested that a decrease in rates of routine childhood vaccinations were due to changes in healthcare access, social distancing, and other erectile dysfunction treatment mitigation strategies.[] The report also stated that “[p]arental concerns about potentially exposing their children to erectile dysfunction treatment during well child visits might contribute to the declines observed.” [] On July 10, 2020, CDC reported its findings of a May survey it conducted to assess the capacity of pediatric health care practices to provide immunization services to children during the erectile dysfunction treatment viagra. The survey, which was limited to practices participating in the treatments for Children program, found that, as of mid-May, 15 percent of Northeast pediatric practices were closed, 12.5 percent of Midwest practices were closed, 6.2 percent of practices in the South were closed, and 10 percent of practices in the West were closed. Most practices had reduced office hours for in-person visits. When asked whether their practices would likely be able to accommodate new patients for immunization services through August, 418 practices (21.3 percent) either responded that this was not likely or the practice was permanently closed or not resuming immunization services for all patients, and 380 (19.6 percent) responded that they were unsure.

Urban practices and those in the Northeast were less likely to be able to accommodate new patients compared with rural practices and those in the South, Midwest, or West.[] In response to these troubling developments, CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics have stressed, “Well-child visits and vaccinations are essential services and help make sure children are protected.” [] The Secretary re-emphasizes that important recommendation to parents and legal guardians here. If your child is due for a well-child visit, contact your pediatrician's or other primary-care provider's office and ask about ways that the office safely offers well-child visits and vaccinations. Many medical offices are taking extra steps to make sure that well-child visits can occur safely during the erectile dysfunction treatment viagra, including. Scheduling sick visits and well-child visits during different times of the Start Printed Page 52138day or days of the week, or at different locations.

Asking patients to remain outside until it is time for their appointments to reduce the number of people in waiting rooms. Adhering to recommended social (physical) distancing and other -control practices, such as the use of masks. The decrease in childhood-vaccination rates is a public health threat and a collateral harm caused by erectile dysfunction treatment. Together, the United States must turn to available medical professionals to limit the harm and public health threats that may result from decreased immunization rates.

We must quickly do so to avoid preventable s in children, additional strains on our healthcare system, and any further increase in avoidable adverse health consequences—particularly if such complications coincide with additional resurgence of erectile dysfunction treatment. Together with pediatricians and other healthcare professionals, pharmacists are positioned to expand access to childhood vaccinations. Many States already allow pharmacists to administer treatments to children of any age.[] Other States permit pharmacists to administer treatments to children depending on the age—for example, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, or 12 years of age and older.[] Few States restrict pharmacist-administered vaccinations to only adults.[] Many States also allow properly trained individuals under the supervision of a trained pharmacist to administer those treatments.[] Pharmacists are well positioned to increase access to vaccinations, particularly in certain areas or for certain populations that have too few pediatricians and other primary-care providers, or that are otherwise medically underserved.[] As of 2018, nearly 90 percent of Americans lived within five miles of a community pharmacy.[] Pharmacies often offer extended hours and added convenience. What is more, pharmacists are trusted healthcare professionals with established relationships with their patients.

Pharmacists also have strong relationships with local medical providers and hospitals to refer patients as appropriate. For example, pharmacists already play a significant role in annual influenza vaccination. In the early 2018-19 season, they administered the influenza treatment to nearly a third of all adults who received the treatment.[] Given the potential danger of serious influenza and continuing erectile dysfunction treatment outbreaks this autumn and the impact that such concurrent outbreaks may have on our population, our healthcare system, and our whole-of-nation response to the erectile dysfunction treatment viagra, we must quickly expand access to influenza vaccinations. Allowing more qualified pharmacists to administer the influenza treatment to children will make vaccinations more accessible.

Therefore, the Secretary amends the Declaration to identify State-licensed pharmacists (and pharmacy interns acting under their supervision if the pharmacy intern is licensed or registered by his or her State board of pharmacy) as qualified persons under section 247d-6d(i)(8)(B) when the pharmacist orders and either the pharmacist or the supervised pharmacy intern administers treatments to individuals ages three through 18 pursuant to the following requirements. The treatment must be FDA-authorized or FDA-approved. The vaccination must be ordered and administered according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule.[] The licensed pharmacist must complete a practical training program of at least 20 hours that is approved by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). This training Start Printed Page 52139program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of treatments, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to treatments.[] The licensed or registered pharmacy intern must complete a practical training program that is approved by the ACPE.

This training program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of treatments, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to treatments.[] The licensed pharmacist and licensed or registered pharmacy intern must have a current certificate in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation.[] The licensed pharmacist must complete a minimum of two hours of ACPE-approved, immunization-related continuing pharmacy education during each State licensing period.[] The licensed pharmacist must comply with recordkeeping and reporting requirements of the jurisdiction in which he or she administers treatments, including informing the patient's primary-care provider when available, submitting the required immunization information to the State or local immunization information system (treatment registry), complying with requirements with respect to reporting adverse events, and complying with requirements whereby the person administering a treatment must review the treatment registry or other vaccination records prior to administering a treatment.[] The licensed pharmacist must inform his or her childhood-vaccination patients and the adult caregivers accompanying the children of the importance of a well-child visit with a pediatrician or other licensed primary-care provider and refer patients as appropriate.[] These requirements are consistent with those in many States that permit licensed pharmacists to order and administer treatments to children and permit licensed or registered pharmacy interns acting under their supervision to administer treatments to children.[] Administering vaccinations to children age three and older is less complicated and requires less training and resources than administering vaccinations to younger children. That is because ACIP generally recommends administering intramuscular injections in the deltoid muscle for individuals age three and older.[] For individuals less than three years of age, ACIP generally recommends administering intramuscular injections in the anterolateral aspect of the thigh muscle.[] Administering injections in the thigh muscle often presents additional complexities and requires additional training and resources including additional personnel to safely position the child while another healthcare professional injects the treatment.[] Moreover, as of 2018, 40% of three-year-olds were enrolled in preprimary programs (i.e. Preschool or kindergarten programs).[] Preprimary programs are beginning in the coming weeks or months, so the Secretary has concluded that it is particularly important for individuals ages three through 18 to receive ACIP-recommended treatments according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule. All States require children to be vaccinated against certain communicable diseases as a condition of school attendance.

These laws often apply to both public and private schools with identical immunization and exemption provisions.[] As nurseries, preschools, kindergartens, and schools reopen, increased access to childhood vaccinations is essential to ensuring children can return. Notwithstanding any State or local scope-of-practice legal requirements, (1) qualified licensed pharmacists are identified as qualified persons to order and administer ACIP-recommended treatments and (2) qualified State-licensed or registered pharmacy interns are identified as qualified persons to administer the ACIP-recommended treatments ordered by their supervising qualified licensed pharmacist.[] Both the PREP Act and the June 4, 2020 Second Amendment to the Declaration define “covered countermeasures” to include qualified viagra and epidemic products that “limit the harm such viagra or epidemic might otherwise cause.” [] The troubling decrease in ACIP-recommended childhood vaccinations and the resulting increased risk of associated diseases, adverse health conditions, and other threats are categories of harms otherwise caused by Start Printed Page 52140erectile dysfunction treatment as set forth in Sections VI and VIII of this Declaration.[] Hence, such vaccinations are “covered countermeasures” under the PREP Act and the June 4, 2020 Second Amendment to the Declaration. Nothing in this Declaration shall be construed to affect the National treatment Injury Compensation Program, including an injured party's ability to obtain compensation under that program. Covered countermeasures that are subject to the National treatment Injury Compensation Program authorized under 42 U.S.C.

300aa-10 et seq. Are covered under this Declaration for the purposes of liability immunity and injury compensation only to the extent that injury compensation is not provided under that Program. All other terms and conditions of the Declaration apply to such covered countermeasures. Section VIII.

Category of Disease, Health Condition, or Threat As discussed, the troubling decrease in ACIP-recommended childhood vaccinations and the resulting increased risk of associated diseases, adverse health conditions, and other threats are categories of harms otherwise caused by erectile dysfunction treatment. The Secretary therefore amends section VIII, which describes the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures, to clarify that the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures is not only erectile dysfunction treatment caused by erectile dysfunction or a viagra mutating therefrom, but also other diseases, health conditions, or threats that may have been caused by erectile dysfunction treatment, erectile dysfunction, or a viagra mutating therefrom, including the decrease in the rate of childhood immunizations, which will lead to an increase in the rate of infectious diseases. Amendments to Declaration Amended Declaration for Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act Coverage for medical countermeasures against erectile dysfunction treatment. Sections V and VIII of the March 10, 2020 Declaration under the PREP Act for medical countermeasures against erectile dysfunction treatment, as amended April 10, 2020 and June 4, 2020, are further amended pursuant to section 319F-3(b)(4) of the PHS Act as described below.

All other sections of the Declaration remain in effect as published at 85 FR 15198 (Mar. 17, 2020) and amended at 85 FR 21012 (Apr. 15, 2020) and 85 FR 35100 (June 8, 2020). 1.

Covered Persons, section V, delete in full and replace with. V. Covered Persons 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d(i)(2), (3), (4), (6), (8)(A) and (B) Covered Persons who are afforded liability immunity under this Declaration are “manufacturers,” “distributors,” “program planners,” “qualified persons,” and their officials, agents, and employees, as those terms are defined in the PREP Act, and the United States.

In addition, I have determined that the following additional persons are qualified persons. (a) Any person authorized in accordance with the public health and medical emergency response of the Authority Having Jurisdiction, as described in Section VII below, to prescribe, administer, deliver, distribute or dispense the Covered Countermeasures, and their officials, agents, employees, contractors and volunteers, following a Declaration of an emergency. (b) any person authorized to prescribe, administer, or dispense the Covered Countermeasures or who is otherwise authorized to perform an activity under an Emergency Use Authorization in accordance with Section 564 of the FD&C Act. (c) any person authorized to prescribe, administer, or dispense Covered Countermeasures in accordance with Section 564A of the FD&C Act.

And (d) a State-licensed pharmacist who orders and administers, and pharmacy interns who administer (if the pharmacy intern acts under the supervision of such pharmacist and the pharmacy intern is licensed or registered by his or her State board of pharmacy), treatments that the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends to persons ages three through 18 according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule. Such State-licensed pharmacists and the State-licensed or registered interns under their supervision are qualified persons only if the following requirements are met. The treatment must be FDA-authorized or FDA-approved. The vaccination must be ordered and administered according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule.

The licensed pharmacist must complete a practical training program of at least 20 hours that is approved by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). This training program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of treatments, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to treatments. The licensed or registered pharmacy intern must complete a practical training program that is approved by the ACPE. This training program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of treatments, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to treatments.

The licensed pharmacist and licensed or registered pharmacy intern must have a current certificate in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The licensed pharmacist must complete a minimum of two hours of ACPE-approved, immunization-related continuing pharmacy education during each State licensing period. The licensed pharmacist must comply with recordkeeping and reporting requirements of the jurisdiction in which he or she administers treatments, including informing the patient's primary-care provider when available, submitting the required immunization information to the State or local immunization information system (treatment registry), complying with requirements with respect to reporting adverse events, and complying with requirements whereby the person administering a treatment must review the treatment registry or other vaccination records prior to administering a treatment. The licensed pharmacist must inform his or her childhood-vaccination patients and the adult caregiver accompanying the child of the importance of a well-child visit with a pediatrician or other licensed primary-care provider and refer patients as appropriate.

Nothing in this Declaration shall be construed to affect the National treatment Injury Compensation Program, including an injured party's ability to obtain compensation under that program. Covered countermeasures that are subject to the National treatment Injury Compensation Program authorized under 42 U.S.C. 300aa-10 et seq. Are covered under this Declaration for the purposes of liability immunity and injury compensation only to the extent that injury compensation is not provided under that Program.

All other Start Printed Page 52141terms and conditions of the Declaration apply to such covered countermeasures. 2. Category of Disease, Health Condition, or Threat, section VIII, delete in full and replace with. VIII.

Category of Disease, Health Condition, or Threat 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d(b)(2)(A) The category of disease, health condition, or threat for which I recommend the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures is not only erectile dysfunction treatment caused by erectile dysfunction or a viagra mutating therefrom, but also other diseases, health conditions, or threats that may have been caused by erectile dysfunction treatment, erectile dysfunction, or a viagra mutating therefrom, including the decrease in the rate of childhood immunizations, which will lead to an increase in the rate of infectious diseases. Start Authority 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d.

End Authority Start Signature Dated. August 19, 2020. Alex M. Azar II, Secretary of Health and Human Services.

End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2020-18542 Filed 8-20-20. 4:15 pm]BILLING CODE 4150-03-P.

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IntroductionIn recent years, many studies have been published on new diagnostic possibilities and management approaches in cohorts of patients suspected to have a disorder/difference of sex development (DSD).1–13 Based on these studies, it has become clear that services and institutions still differ in the composition of the http://pacificanaturopathic.com/ multidisciplinary teams that provide order viagra from canada care for patients who have a DSD.11 14 Several projects have now worked to resolve this variability in care. The European Cooperation in Science and Technology (EU COST) action BM1303 ‘A systematic elucidation of differences of sex development’ has been a platform to achieve European agreement on harmonisation of clinical management and laboratory practices.15–17 Another such initiative involved an update of the 2006 DSD consensus document by an international group of professionals and patient representatives.18 These initiatives have highlighted how cultural and financial aspects and the availability of resources differ significantly between countries and societies, a situation that hampers supranational agreement on common diagnostic order viagra from canada protocols. As only a few national guidelines have been published in international journals, comparison of these guidelines is difficult even though such a comparison is necessary to capture the differences and initiate actions to overcome them. Nonetheless, four DSD (expert) order viagra from canada centres located in the Netherlands and Flanders (the Dutch-speaking Northern part of Belgium) have collaborated to produce a detailed guideline on diagnostics in DSD.19 This shows that a supranational guideline can be a reasonable approach for countries with similarly structured healthcare systems and similar resources.

Within the guideline there is agreement that optimisation of expertise and care can be achieved through centralisation, for example, by limiting analysis of next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based diagnostic panels to only a few centres and by centralising pathological review of gonadal tissues. International networks such as the European Reference Network for rare endocrine conditions (EndoERN), in which DSD is embedded, may facilitate the expansion of this kind of collaboration across Europe.This paper order viagra from canada highlights key discussion points in the Dutch-Flemish guideline that have been insufficiently addressed in the literature thus far because they reflect evolving technologies or less visible stakeholders. For example, prenatal observation of an atypical aspect of the genitalia indicating a possible DSD is becoming increasingly common, and we discuss appropriate counselling and a diagnostic approach for these cases, including the option of using NGS-based genetic testing. So far, little attention has been paid to this process.20 21 Furthermore, informing patients and/or their parents about atypical sex development and why this may warrant referral to a specialised team may be challenging, especially for professionals with limited experience in DSD.22 23 Therefore, a section of the Dutch-Flemish guideline was written order viagra from canada for these healthcare providers.

Moreover, this enables DSD specialists to refer to the guideline when advising a referral. Transition from the prenatal to the postnatal team and from the paediatric to the adult team requires optimal communication between the order viagra from canada specialists involved. Application of NGS-based techniques may lead to a higher diagnostic yield, providing a molecular genetic diagnosis in previously unsolved cases.16 We address the timing of this testing and the problems associated with this technique such as the interpretation of variants of unknown clinical significance (VUS). Similarly, histopathological interpretation and classification of removed gonadal tissue is challenging and would benefit from international collaboration and centralisation of expertise.MethodsFor the guideline revision, an interdisciplinary multicentre order viagra from canada group was formed with all members responsible for updating the literature for a specific part of the guideline.

Literature search in PubMed was not systematic, but rather intended to be broad in order to cover all areas and follow expert opinions. This approach is more in line with the Clinical Practice Advisory Document method described by Burke et al24 for guidelines involving genetic practice because it is often troublesome to order viagra from canada substantiate such guidelines with sufficient evidence due to the rapid changes in testing methods, for example, gene panels. All input provided by the group was synthesised by the chairperson (YvB), who also reviewed abstracts of papers on DSD published between 2010 and September 2017 for the guideline and up to October 2019 for this paper. Abstracts had to be written in English and were identified using a broad range of order viagra from canada Medical Subject Headings terms (eg, DSD, genetic, review, diagnosis, diagnostics, 46,XX DSD, 46,XY DSD, guideline, multidisciplinary care).

Next, potentially relevant papers on diagnostic procedures in DSD were selected. Case reports order viagra from canada were excluded, as were articles that were not open access or retrievable through institutional access. Based on this, a draft guideline was produced that was in line with the international principles of good diagnostic care in DSD. This draft was discussed by the writing committee and, after having obtained agreement on remaining points of order viagra from canada discussion, revised into a final draft.

This version was sent to a broad group of professionals from academic centres and DSD teams whose members had volunteered to review the draft guideline. After receiving and incorporating their input, order viagra from canada the final version was presented to the paediatric and genetic associations for approval. After approval by the members of the paediatric (NVK), clinical genetic (VKGN) and genetic laboratory (VKGL) associations, the guideline was published on their respective websites.19 Although Turner syndrome and Klinefelter syndrome are considered to be part of the DSD spectrum, they are not extensively discussed in this diagnostic guideline as guidelines dedicated to these syndromes already exist.25 26 However, some individuals with Turner syndrome or Klinefelter syndrome may present with ambiguous or atypical genitalia and may therefore initially follow the DSD diagnostic process.Guideline highlightsPrenatal settingPresentationThe most frequent prenatal presentation of a DSD condition is atypical genitalia found on prenatal ultrasound as an isolated finding or in combination with other structural anomalies. This usually occurs after the 20-week routine medical ultrasound for screening of congenital anomalies, but may also occur earlier, for example, when a commercial ultrasound is performed at the request of the parents.Another way DSD can be diagnosed before birth is when invasive order viagra from canada prenatal genetic testing carried out for a different reason, for example, due to suspicion of other structural anomalies, reveals a discrepancy between the genotypic sex and the phenotypic sex seen by ultrasound.

In certified laboratories, the possibility of a sample switch is extremely low but should be ruled out immediately. More often, the discrepancy will be due to sex-chromosome mosaicism or a true form of DSD.A situation now occurring with increasing frequency is a discrepancy between the genotypic sex revealed by non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT), which is now available to high-risk pregnant women in the Netherlands and to all pregnant women in order viagra from canada Belgium, and later ultrasound findings. NIPT screens for CNVs in the fetus. However, depending on legal restrictions and/or ethical considerations, the X and Y chromosomes are not always included in NIPT analysis order viagra from canada and reports.

If the X and Y chromosomes are included, it is important to realise that the presence of a Y-chromosome does not necessarily imply male fetal development. At the time that NIPT is performed (usually 11–13 weeks), genital development cannot be reliably appreciated by ultrasound, so any discrepancy or atypical aspect of the genitalia will only be order viagra from canada noticed later in pregnancy and should prompt further evaluation.Counselling and diagnosticsIf a DSD is suspected, first-line sonographers and obstetricians should refer the couple to their colleague prenatal specialists working with or in a DSD team. After confirming an atypical genital on ultrasound, the specialist team should offer the couple a referral for genetic counselling to discuss the possibility of performing invasive prenatal testing (usually an amniocentesis) to identify an underlying cause that fits the ultrasound findings.22 23 To enable the parents to make a well-informed decision, prenatal counselling should, in our opinion, include. Information on the ultrasound findings and the limitations of this technique order viagra from canada.

The procedure(s) that can be followed, including the risks associated with an amniocentesis. And the order viagra from canada type of information genetic testing can and cannot provide. Knowing which information has been provided and what words have been used by the prenatal specialist is very helpful for those involved in postnatal care.It is important that parents understand that the biological sex of a baby is determined by a complex interplay of chromosomes, genes and hormones, and thus that assessment of the presence or absence of a Y-chromosome alone is insufficient to assign the sex of their unborn child or, as in any unborn child, say anything about the child’s future gender identity.Expecting parents can be counselled by the clinical geneticist and the psychologist from the DSD team, although other DSD specialists can also be involved. The clinical geneticist should be experienced in prenatal counselling and well informed about the diagnostic possibilities given the limited time span in which test results need to be available to allow parents to make a well-informed decision about whether or not to continue order viagra from canada the pregnancy.

Termination of pregnancy can be considered, for instance, order viagra from canada in a syndromic form of DSD with multiple malformations, but when the DSD occurs as an apparently isolated condition, expecting parents may also consider termination of pregnancy, which, although considered controversial by some, is legal in Belgium and the Netherlands. The psychologist of the DSD team can support parents during and after pregnancy and help them cope with feelings of uncertainty and eventual considerations of a termination of pregnancy, as well as with practical issues, for example, how to inform others. The stress order viagra from canada of not knowing exactly what the child’s genitalia will look like and uncertainty about the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis cannot be avoided completely. Parents are informed that if the postnatal phenotype is different from what was prenatally expected, the advice given about diagnostic testing can be adjusted accordingly, for example, if a hypospadias is milder than was expected based on prenatal ultrasound images.

In our experience, parents appreciate having already spoken to some members of the DSD team during pregnancy and having a contact person order viagra from canada before birth.After expert prenatal counselling, a significant number of pregnant couples decline prenatal testing (personal experience IALG, MK, ABD, YvB, MC and HC-vdG). At birth, umbilical cord blood is a good source for (molecular) karyotyping and storage of DNA and can be obtained by the obstetrician, midwife or neonatologist. The terminology used in communication with parents should be carefully chosen,22 23 and midwives and staff of neonatal and delivery units should be clearly instructed to use gender-neutral and non-stigmatising vocabulary (eg, ‘your baby’) as long as order viagra from canada sex assignment is pending.An algorithm for diagnostic evaluation of a suspected DSD in the prenatal situation is proposed in figure 1. When couples opt for invasive prenatal diagnosis, the genetic analysis usually involves an (SNP)-array.

It was recently estimated that >30% of individuals who have a DSD have additional structural anomalies, with order viagra from canada cardiac and neurological anomalies and fetal growth restriction being particularly common.27 28 If additional anomalies are seen, the geneticist can consider specific gene defects that may underlie a known genetic syndrome or carry out NGS. NGS-based techniques have also now made their appearance in prenatal diagnosis of congenital anomalies.29 30 Panels using these techniques can be specific for genes involved in DSD, or be larger panels covering multiple congenital anomalies, and are usually employed with trio-analysis to compare variants identified in the child with the parents’ genetics.29–31 Finding a genetic cause before delivery can help reduce parental stress in the neonatal period and speed up decisions regarding gender assignment. In such cases there is no tight time limit, and we propose completing the analysis well before the expected delivery.Disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) order viagra from canada in the prenatal setting. A diagnostic algorithm.

*SOX9. Upstream anomalies and balanced translocations at promotor sites!. Conventional karyotyping can be useful. NGS, next-generation sequencing." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 1 Disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the prenatal setting.

A diagnostic algorithm. *SOX9. Upstream anomalies and balanced translocations at promotor sites!. Conventional karyotyping can be useful.

NGS, next-generation sequencing.First contact by a professional less experienced in DSDWhereas most current guidelines start from the point when an individual has been referred to the DSD team,1 15 the Dutch-Flemish guideline dedicates a chapter to healthcare professionals less experienced in DSD as they are often the first to suspect or identify such a condition. Apart from the paper of Indyk,7 little guidance is available for these professionals about how to act in such a situation. The chapter in the Dutch-Flemish guideline summarises the various clinical presentations that a DSD can have and provides information on how to communicate with parents and/or patients about the findings of the physical examination, the first-line investigations and the need for prompt referral to a specialised centre for further evaluation. Clinical examples are offered to illustrate some of these recurring situations.

The medical issues in DSD can be very challenging, and the social and psychological impact is high. For neonates with ambiguous genitalia, sex assignment is an urgent and crucial issue, and it is mandatory that parents are informed that it is possible to postpone registration of their child’s sex. In cases where sex assignment has already taken place, the message that the development of the gonads or genitalia is still atypical is complicated and distressing for patients and parents or carers. A list of contact details for DSD centres and patient organisations in the Netherlands and Flanders is attached to the Dutch-Flemish guideline.

Publishing such a list, either in guidelines or online, can help healthcare professionals find the nearest centres for consultations and provide patients and patient organisations with an overview of the centres where expertise is available.Timing and place of genetic testing using NGS-based gene panelsThe diagnostic workup that is proposed for 46,XX and 46,XY DSD is shown in figures 2 and 3, respectively. Even with the rapidly expanding molecular possibilities, a (family) history and a physical examination remain the essential first steps in the diagnostic process. Biochemical and hormonal screening aim at investigating serum electrolytes, renal function and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axes. Ultrasound screening of kidneys and internal genitalia, as well as establishing genotypic sex, should be accomplished within 48 hours and complete the baseline diagnostic work-up of a child born with ambiguous genitalia.1 16 32 3346,XX disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the postnatal setting.

A diagnostic algorithm. NGS, next-generation sequencing. CAH, Congenital adrenal hyperplasia. AMH, Anti-Müllerian Hormone." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 2 46,XX disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the postnatal setting.

A diagnostic algorithm. NGS, next-generation sequencing. CAH, Congenital adrenal hyperplasia. AMH, Anti-Müllerian Hormone.46,XY disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the postnatal setting.

A diagnostic algorithm. * SOX9. Upstream anomalies and balanced translocations at promotor sites!. Conventional karyotyping can be useful.

NGS, next-generation sequencing." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 3 46,XY disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the postnatal setting. A diagnostic algorithm. *SOX9. Upstream anomalies and balanced translocations at promotor sites!.

Conventional karyotyping can be useful. NGS, next-generation sequencing.Very recently, a European position paper has been published focusing on the genetic workup of DSD.16 It highlights the limitations and drawbacks of NGS-based tests, which include the chance of missing subtle structural variants such as CNVs and mosaicism and the fact that NGS cannot detect methylation defects or other epigenetic changes.16 28 31 Targeted DNA analysis is preferred in cases where hormonal investigations suggest a block in steroidogenesis (eg, 11-β-hydroxylase deficiency, 21-hydroxylase deficiency), or in the context of a specific clinical constellation such as the often coincidental finding of Müllerian structures in a boy with normal external genitalia or cryptorchidism, that is, persistent Müllerian duct syndrome.33 34 Alternative tests should also be considered depending on the available information. Sometimes, a simple mouth swab for FISH analysis can detect mosaic XY/X in a male with hypospadias or asymmetric gonadal development or in a female with little or no Turner syndrome stigmata and a normal male molecular karyotyping profile or peripheral blood karyotype. Such targeted testing avoids incidental findings and is cheaper and faster than analysis of a large NGS-based panel, although the cost difference is rapidly declining.However, due to the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of DSD conditions, the most cost-effective next steps in the majority of cases are whole exome sequencing followed by panel analysis of genes involved in genital development and function or trio-analysis of a large gene panel (such as a Mendeliome).16 35–38 Pretest genetic counselling involves discussing what kind of information will be reported to patients or parents and the chance of detecting VUS, and the small risk of incidental findings when analysing a DSD panel should be mentioned.

Laboratories also differ in what class of variants they report.39 In our experience, the fear of incidental findings is a major reason why some parents refrain from genetic testing.Timing of the DSD gene panel analysis is also important. While some patients or parents prefer that all diagnostic procedures be performed as soon as possible, others need time to reflect on the complex information related to more extensive genetic testing and on its possible consequences. If parents or patients do not consent to panel-based genetic testing, analysis of specific genes, such as WT1, should be considered when appropriate in view of the clinical consequences if a mutation is present (eg, clinical surveillance of renal function and screening for Wilms’ tumour in the case of WT1 mutations). Genes that are more frequently involved in DSD (eg, SRY, NR5A1) and that match the specific clinical and hormonal features in a given patient could also be considered for sequencing.

Targeted gene analysis may also be preferred in centres located in countries that do not have the resources or technical requirements to perform NGS panel-based genetic testing. Alternatively, participation by these centres in international collaborative networks may allow them to outsource the molecular genetic workup abroad.Gene panels differ between centres and are regularly updated based on scientific progress. A comparison of DSD gene panels used in recent studies can be found at https://www.nature.com/articles/s41574-018-0010-8%23Sec46.15 The panels currently used at the coauthors’ institutions can be found on their respective websites. Given the pace of change, it is important to regularly consider repeating analysis in patients with an unexplained DSD, for example, when they transition into adult care or when they move from one centre to another.

This also applies to patients in whom a clinical diagnosis has never been genetically confirmed. Confusion may arise when the diagnosis cannot be confirmed or when a mutation is identified in a different gene, for example, NR5A1 in someone with a clinical diagnosis of CAIS that has other consequences for relatives. Hence, new genetic counselling should always accompany new diagnostic endeavours.Class 3 variants and histopathological examinationsThe rapidly evolving diagnostic possibilities raise new questions. What do laboratories report?.

How should we deal with the frequent findings of mainly unique VUS or class 3 variants (ACMG recommendation) in the many different DSD-related genes in the diagnostic setting?. Reporting VUS can be a source of uncertainty for parents, but not reporting these variants precludes further investigations to determine their possible pathogenicity. It can also be difficult to prove variant pathogenicity, both on gene-level and variant-level.39 Moreover, given the gonad-specific expression of some genes and the variable phenotypic spectrum and reduced penetrance, segregation analysis is not always informative. A class 3 variant that does not fit the clinical presentation may be unrelated to the observed phenotype, but it could also represent a newly emerging phenotype.

This was recently demonstrated by the identification of the NR5A1 mutation, R92W, in individuals with 46,XX testicular and ovotesticular DSD.40 This gene had previously been associated with 46,XY DSD. In diagnostic laboratories, there is usually no capacity or expertise to conduct large-scale functional studies to determine pathogenicity of these unique class 3 VUS in the different genes involved in DSD. Functional validation of variants identified in novel genes may be more attractive in a research context. However, for individual families with VUS in well-established DSD genes such as AR or HSD17B3, functional analysis may provide a confirmed diagnosis that implies for relatives the option of undergoing their own DNA analysis and estimating the genetic risk of their own future offspring.

This makes genetic follow-up important in these cases and demonstrates the usefulness of international databases and networks and the centralisation of functional studies of genetic variants in order to reduce costs and maximise expertise.The same is true for histopathological description, germ-cell tumour risk assessment in specific forms of DSD and classification of gonadal samples. Germ-cell tumour risk is related to the type of DSD (among other factors), but it is impossible to make risk estimates in individual cases.41–44 Gonadectomy may be indicated in cases with high-risk dysgenetic abdominal gonads that cannot be brought into a stable superficial (ie, inguinal, labioscrotal) position that allows clinical or radiological surveillance, or to avoid virilisation due to 5-alpha reductase deficiency in a 46,XY girl with a stable female gender identity.45 Pathological examination of DSD gonads requires specific expertise. For example, the differentiation between benign germ cell abnormalities, such as delayed maturation and (pre)malignant development of germ cells, is crucial for clinical management but can be very troublesome.46 Centralised pathological examination of gonadal biopsy and gonadectomy samples in one centre, or a restricted number of centres, on a national scale can help to overcome the problem of non-uniform classification and has proven feasible in the Netherlands and Belgium. We therefore believe that uniform assessment and classification of gonadal differentiation patterns should also be addressed in guidelines on DSD management.International databases of gonadal tissues are crucial for learning more about the risk of malignancy in different forms of DSD, but they are only reliable if uniform criteria for histological classification are strictly applied.46 These criteria could be incorporated in many existing networks such as the I-DSD consortium, the Disorders of Sex Development Translational Research Network, the European Reference Network on Urogenital Diseases (eUROGEN), the EndoERN and COST actions.15–17 47Communication at the transition from paediatric to adult carePaediatric and adult teams need to collaborate closely to facilitate a well-organised transition from paediatric to adult specialist care.15 48–50 Both teams need to exchange information optimally and should consider transition as a longitudinal process rather than a fixed moment in time.

Age-appropriate information is key at all ages, and an overview of topics to be discussed at each stage is described by Cools et al.15 Table 1 shows an example of how transition can be organised.View this table:Table 1 Example of transition table as used in the DSD clinic of the Erasmus Medical CenterPsychological support and the continued provision of information remains important for individuals with a DSD at all ages.15 22 In addition to the information given by the DSD team members, families and patients can benefit from resources such as support groups and information available on the internet.47 Information available online should be checked for accuracy and completeness when referring patients and parents to internet sites.Recommendations for future actionsMost guidelines and articles on the diagnosis and management of DSD are aimed at specialists and are only published in specialist journals or on websites for endocrinologists, urologists or geneticists. Yet there is a need for guidelines directed towards first-line and second-line healthcare workers that summarise the recommendations about the first crucial steps in the management of DSD. These should be published in widely available general medical journals and online, along with a national list of DSD centres. Furthermore, DSD (expert) centres should provide continuous education to all those who may be involved in the identification of individuals with a DSD in order to enable these healthcare professionals to recognise atypical genitalia, to promptly refer individuals who have a DSD and to inform the patient and parents about this and subsequent diagnostic procedures.As DSD continues to be a rare condition, it will take time to evaluate the effects of having such a guideline on the preparedness of first-line and second-line healthcare workers to recognise DSD conditions.

One way to evaluate this might be the development and use of questionnaires asking patients, carers and families and referring physicians how satisfied they were with the initial medical consultation and referral and what could be improved. A helpful addition to existing international databases that collect information on genetic variations would be a list of centres that offer suitable functional studies for certain genes, ideally covering the most frequently mutated genes (at minimum).Patient organisations can also play an important role in informing patients about newly available diagnostic or therapeutic strategies and options, and their influence and specific role has now been recognised and discussed in several publications.17 47 However, it should be kept in mind that these organisations do not represent all patients, as a substantial number of patients and parents are not member of such an organisation.Professionals have to provide optimal medical care based on well-established evidence, or at least on broad consensus. Yet not everything can be regulated by recommendations and guidelines. Options, ideas and wishes should be openly discussed between professionals, patients and families within their confidential relationship.

This will enable highly individualised holistic care tailored to the patient’s needs and expectations. Once they are well-informed of all available options, parents and/or patients can choose what they consider the optimal care for their children or themselves.15 16ConclusionThe Dutch-Flemish guideline uniquely addresses some topics that are under-represented in the literature, thus adding some key aspects to those addressed in recent consensus papers and guidelines.15–17 33 47As more children with a DSD are now being identified prenatally, and the literature on prenatal diagnosis of DSD remains scarce,20 21 we propose a prenatal diagnostic algorithm and emphasise the importance of having a prenatal specialist involved in or collaborating with DSD (expert) centres.We also stress that good communication between all involved parties is essential. Professionals should be well informed about protocols and communication. Collaboration between centres is necessary to optimise aspects of care such as uniform interpretation of gonadal pathology and functional testing of class 3 variants found by genetic testing.

Guidelines can provide a framework within which individualised patient care should be discussed with all stakeholders.AcknowledgmentsThe authors would like to thank the colleagues of the DSD teams for their input in and critical reading of the Dutch-Flemish guideline. Amsterdam University Center (AMC and VU), Maastricht University Medical Center, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen, University Medical Center Groningen, University Medical Center Utrecht, Ghent University Hospital. The authors would like to thank Kate McIntyre for editing the revised manuscript and Tom de Vries Lentsch for providing the figures as a PDF. Three of the authors of this publication are members of the European Reference Network for rare endocrine diseases—Project ID 739543.IntroductionEndometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological malignancy in the developed world.1 Its incidence has risen over the last two decades as a consequence of the ageing population, fewer hysterectomies for benign disease and the obesity epidemic.

In the USA, it is estimated that women have a 1 in 35 lifetime risk of endometrial cancer, and in contrast to cancers of most other sites, cancer-specific mortality has risen by approximately 2% every year since 2008 related to the rapidly rising incidence.2Endometrial cancer has traditionally been classified into type I and type II based on morphology.3 The more common subtype, type I, is mostly comprised of endometrioid tumours and is oestrogen-driven, arises from a hyperplastic endometrium, presents at Visit Website an early stage and has an excellent 5 year survival rate.4 By contrast, type II includes non-endometrioid tumours, specifically serous, carcinosarcoma and clear cell subtypes, which are biologically aggressive tumours with a poor prognosis that are often diagnosed at an advanced stage.5 Recent efforts have focused on a molecular classification system for more accurate categorisation of endometrial tumours into four groups with distinct prognostic profiles.6 7The majority of endometrial cancers arise through the interplay of familial, genetic and lifestyle factors. Two inherited cancer predisposition syndromes, Lynch syndrome and the much rarer Cowden syndrome, substantially increase the lifetime risk of endometrial cancer, but these only account for around 3–5% of cases.8–10 Having first or second degree relative(s) with endometrial or colorectal cancer increases endometrial cancer risk, although a large European twin study failed to demonstrate a strong heritable link.11 The authors failed to show that there was greater concordance in monozygotic than dizygotic twins, but the study was based on relatively small numbers of endometrial cancers. Lu and colleagues reported an association between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and endometrial cancer risk, revealing the potential role of SNPs in explaining part of the risk in both the familial and general populations.12 Thus far, many SNPs have been reported to modify susceptibility to endometrial cancer. However, much of this work predated genome wide association studies and is of variable quality.

Understanding genetic predisposition to endometrial cancer could facilitate personalised risk assessment with a view to targeted prevention and screening interventions.13 This emerged as the most important unanswered research question in endometrial cancer according to patients, carers and healthcare professionals in our recently completed James Lind Womb Cancer Alliance Priority Setting Partnership.14 It would be particularly useful for non-endometrioid endometrial cancers, for which advancing age is so far the only predictor.15We therefore conducted a comprehensive systematic review of the literature to provide an overview of the relationship between SNPs and endometrial cancer risk. We compiled a list of the most robust endometrial cancer-associated SNPs. We assessed the applicability of this panel of SNPs with a theoretical polygenic risk score (PRS) calculation. We also critically appraised the meta-analyses investigating the most frequently reported SNPs in MDM2.

Finally, we described all SNPs reported within genes and pathways that are likely involved in endometrial carcinogenesis and metastasis.MethodsOur systematic review follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) collaboration 2009 recommendations. The registered protocol is available through PROSPERO (CRD42018091907).16Search strategyWe searched Embase, MEDLINE and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases via the Healthcare Databases Advanced Search (HDAS) platform, from 2007 to 2018, to identify studies reporting associations between polymorphisms and endometrial cancer risk. Key words including MeSH (Medical Subject Heading) terms and free-text words were searched in both titles and abstracts. The following terms were used.

€œendomet*”,“uter*”, “womb”, “cancer(s)”, “neoplasm(s)”, “endometrium tumour”, “carcinoma”, “adenosarcoma”, “clear cell carcinoma”, “carcinosarcoma”, “SNP”, “single nucleotide polymorphism”, “GWAS”, and “genome-wide association study/ies”. No other restrictions were applied. The search was repeated with time restrictions between 2018 and June 2019 to capture any recent publications.Eligibility criteriaStudies were selected for full-text evaluation if they were primary articles investigating a relationship between endometrial cancer and SNPs. Study outcome was either the increased or decreased risk of endometrial cancer relative to controls reported as an odds ratio (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs).Study selectionThree independent reviewers screened all articles uploaded to a screening spreadsheet developed by Helena VonVille.17 Disagreements were resolved by discussion.

Chronbach’s α score was calculated between reviewers and indicated high consistency at 0.92. Case–control, prospective and retrospective studies, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and both discovery and validation studies were selected for full-text evaluation. Non-English articles, editorials, conference abstracts and proceedings, letters and correspondence, case reports and review articles were excluded.Candidate-gene studies with at least 100 women and GWAS with at least 1000 women in the case arm were selected to ensure reliability of the results, as explained by Spencer et al.18 To construct a panel of up to 30 SNPs with the strongest evidence of association, those with the strongest p values were selected. For the purpose of an SNP panel, articles utilising broad European or multi-ethnic cohorts were selected.

Where overlapping populations were identified, the most comprehensive study was included.Data extraction and synthesisFor each study, the following data were extracted. SNP ID, nearby gene(s)/chromosome location, OR (95% CI), p value, minor or effect allele frequency (MAF/EAF), EA (effect allele) and OA (other allele), adjustment, ethnicity and ancestry, number of cases and controls, endometrial cancer type, and study type including discovery or validation study and meta-analysis. For risk estimates, a preference towards most adjusted results was applied. For candidate-gene studies, a standard p value of<0.05 was applied and for GWAS a p value of <5×10-8, indicating genome-wide significance, was accepted as statistically significant.

However, due to the limited number of SNPs with p values reaching genome-wide significance, this threshold was then lowered to <1×10-5, allowing for marginally significant SNPs to be included. As shown by Mavaddat et al, for breast cancer, SNPs that fall below genome-wide significance may still be useful for generating a PRS and improving the models.19We estimated the potential value of a PRS based on the most significant SNPs by comparing the predicted risk for a woman with a risk score in the top 1% of the distribution to the mean predicted risk. Per-allele ORs and MAFs were taken from the publications and standard errors (SEs) for the lnORs were derived from published 95% CIs. The PRS was assumed to have a Normal distribution, with mean 2∑βipI and SE, σ, equal to √2∑βi2pI(1−pi), according to the binomial distribution, where the summation is over all SNPs in the risk score.

Hence the relative risk (RR) comparing the top 1% of the distribution to the mean is given by exp(Z0.01σ), where Z is the inverse of the standard normal cumulative distribution.ResultsThe flow chart of study selection is illustrated in figure 1. In total, 453 text articles were evaluated and, of those, 149 articles met our inclusion criteria. One study was excluded from table 1, for having an Asian-only population, as this would make it harder to compare with the rest of the results which were all either multi-ethnic or Caucasian cohorts, as stated in our inclusion criteria for the SNP panel.20 Any SNPs without 95% CIs were also excluded from any downstream analysis. Additionally, SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (r2 >0.2) with each other were examined, and of those in linkage disequilibrium, the SNP with strongest association was reported.

Per allele ORs were used unless stated otherwise.View this table:Table 1 List of top SNPs most likely to contribute to endometrial cancer risk identified through systematic review of recent literature21–25Study selection flow diagram. *Reasons. Irrelevant articles, articles focusing on other conditions, non-GWAS/candidate-gene study related articles, technical and duplicate articles. GWAS, genome-wide association study.

Adapted from. Moher D, Liberati A, Tetzlaff J, Altman DG, The PRISMA Group (2009). Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. The PRISMA Statement.

PLoS Med 6(6). E1000097. Doi:10.1371/journal.pmed1000097." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 1 Study selection flow diagram. *Reasons.

Irrelevant articles, articles focusing on other conditions, non-GWAS/candidate-gene study related articles, technical and duplicate articles. GWAS, genome-wide association study. Adapted from. Moher D, Liberati A, Tetzlaff J, Altman DG, The PRISMA Group (2009).

Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. The PRISMA Statement. PLoS Med 6(6). E1000097.

Doi:10.1371/journal.pmed1000097.Top SNPs associated with endometrial cancer riskFollowing careful interpretation of the data, 24 independent SNPs with the lowest p values that showed the strongest association with endometrial cancer were obtained (table 1).21–25 These SNPs are located in or around genes coding for transcription factors, cell growth and apoptosis regulators, and enzymes involved in the steroidogenesis pathway. All the SNPs presented here were reported on the basis of a GWAS or in one case, an exome-wide association study, and hence no SNPs from candidate-gene studies made it to the list. This is partly due to the nature of larger GWAS providing more comprehensive and powered results as opposed to candidate gene studies. Additionally, a vast majority of SNPs reported by candidate-gene studies were later refuted by large-scale GWAS such as in the case of TERT and MDM2 variants.26 27 The exception to this is the CYP19 gene, where candidate-gene studies reported an association between variants in this gene with endometrial cancer in both Asian and broad European populations, and this association was more recently confirmed by large-scale GWAS.21 28–30 Moreover, a recent article authored by O’Mara and colleagues reviewed the GWAS that identified most of the currently known SNPs associated with endometrial cancer.31Most of the studies represented in table 1 are GWAS and the majority of these involved broad European populations.

Those having a multi-ethnic cohort also consisted primarily of broad European populations. Only four of the variants in table 1 are located in coding regions of a gene, or in regulatory flanking regions around the gene. Thus, most of these variants would not be expected to cause any functional effects on the gene or the resulting protein. An eQTL search using GTEx Portal showed that some of the SNPs are significantly associated (p<0.05) with modified transcription levels of the respective genes in various tissues such as prostate (rs11263761), thyroid (rs9668337), pituitary (rs2747716), breast mammary (rs882380) and testicular (rs2498794) tissue, as summarised in table 2.View this table:Table 2 List of eQTL hits for the selected panel of SNPsThe only variant for which there was an indication of a specific association with non-endometrioid endometrial cancer was rs148261157 near the BCL11A gene.

The A allele of this SNP had a moderately higher association in the non-endometrioid arm (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.04. P=9.6×10-6) compared with the endometrioid arm (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.38. P=4.7×10-6).21Oestrogen receptors α and β encoded by ESR1 and ESR2, respectively, have been extensively studied due to the assumed role of oestrogens in the development of endometrial cancer. O’Mara et al reported a lead SNP (rs79575945) in the ESR1 region that was associated with endometrial cancer (p=1.86×10-5).24 However, this SNP did not reach genome-wide significance in a more recent larger GWAS.21 No statistically significant associations have been reported between endometrial cancer and SNPs in the ESR2 gene region.AKT is an oncogene linked to endometrial carcinogenesis.

It is involved in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pro-proliferative signalling pathway to inactivate apoptosis and allow cell survival. The A allele of rs2494737 and G allele of rs2498796 were reported to be associated with increased and decreased risk of endometrial cancer in 2016, respectively.22 30 However, this association was not replicated in a larger GWAS in 2018.21 Nevertheless, given the previous strong indications, and biological basis that could explain endometrial carcinogenesis, we decided to include an AKT1 variant (rs2498794) in our results.PTEN is a multi-functional tumour suppressor gene that regulates the AKT/PKB signalling pathway and is commonly mutated in many cancers including endometrial cancer.32 Loss-of-function germline mutations in PTEN are responsible for Cowden syndrome, which exerts a lifetime risk of endometrial cancer of up to 28%.9 Lacey and colleagues studied SNPs in the PTEN gene region. However, none showed significant differences in frequency between 447 endometrial cancer cases and 439 controls of European ancestry.33KRAS mutations are known to be present in endometrial cancer. These can be activated by high levels of KLF5 (transcriptional activator).

Three SNPs have been identified in or around KLF5 that are associated with endometrial cancer. The G allele of rs11841589 (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.21. P=4.83×10-11), the A allele of rs9600103 (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.30. P=3.76×10-12) and C allele of rs7981863 (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.20.

P=2.70×10-17) have all been found to be associated with an increased likelihood of endometrial cancer in large European cohorts.21 30 34 It is worth noting that these SNPs are not independent, and hence they quite possibly tag the same causal variant.The MYC family of proto-oncogenes encode transcription factors that regulate cell proliferation, which can contribute to cancer development if dysregulated. The recent GWAS by O’Mara et al reported three SNPs within the MYC region that reached genome-wide significance with conditional p values reaching at least 5×10–8.35To test the utility of these SNPs as predictive markers, we devised a theoretical PRS calculation using the log ORs and EAFs per SNP from the published data. The results were very encouraging with an RR of 3.16 for the top 1% versus the mean, using all the top SNPs presented in table 1 and 2.09 when using only the SNPs that reached genome-wide significance (including AKT1).Controversy surrounding MDM2 variant SNP309MDM2 negatively regulates tumour suppressor gene TP53, and as such, has been extensively studied in relation to its potential role in predisposition to endometrial cancer. Our search identified six original studies of the association between MDM2 SNP rs2279744 (also referred to as SNP309) and endometrial cancer, all of which found a statistically significant increased risk per copy of the G allele.

Two more original studies were identified through our full-text evaluation. However, these were not included here as they did not meet our inclusion criteria—one due to small sample size, the other due to studying rs2279744 status dependent on another SNP.36 37 Even so, the two studies were described in multiple meta-analyses that are listed in table 3. Different permutations of these eight original studies appear in at least eight published meta-analyses. However, even the largest meta-analysis contained <2000 cases (table 3)38View this table:Table 3 Characteristics of studies that examined MDM2 SNP rs2279744In comparison, a GWAS including nearly 13 000 cases found no evidence of an association with OR and corresponding 95% CI of 1.00 (0.97 to 1.03) and a p value of 0.93 (personal communication).21 Nevertheless, we cannot completely rule out a role for MDM2 variants in endometrial cancer predisposition as the candidate-gene studies reported larger effects in Asians, whereas the GWAS primarily contained participants of European ancestry.

There is also some suggestion that the SNP309 variant is in linkage disequilibrium with another variant, SNP285, which confers an opposite effect.It is worth noting that the SNP285C/SNP309G haplotype frequency was observed in up to 8% of Europeans, thus requiring correction for the confounding effect of SNP285C in European studies.39 However, aside from one study conducted by Knappskog et al, no other study including the meta-analyses corrected for the confounding effect of SNP285.40 Among the studies presented in table 3, Knappskog et al (2012) reported that after correcting for SNP285, the OR for association of this haplotype with endometrial cancer was much lower, though still significant. Unfortunately, the meta-analyses which synthesised Knappskog et al (2012), as part of their analysis, did not correct for SNP285C in the European-based studies they included.38 41 42 It is also concerning that two meta-analyses using the same primary articles failed to report the same result, in two instances.38 42–44DiscussionThis article represents the most comprehensive systematic review to date, regarding critical appraisal of the available evidence of common low-penetrance variants implicated in predisposition to endometrial cancer. We have identified the most robust SNPs in the context of endometrial cancer risk. Of those, only 19 were significant at genome-wide level and a further five were considered marginally significant.

The largest GWAS conducted in this field was the discovery- and meta-GWAS by O’Mara et al, which utilised 12 096 cases and 108 979 controls.21 Despite the inclusion of all published GWAS and around 5000 newly genotyped cases, the total number did not reach anywhere near what is currently available for other common cancers such as breast cancer. For instance, BCAC (Breast Cancer Association Consortium) stands at well over 200 000 individuals with more than half being cases, and resulted in identification of ~170 SNPs in relation to breast cancer.19 45 A total of 313 SNPs including imputations were then used to derive a PRS for breast cancer.19 Therefore, further efforts should be directed to recruit more patients, with deep phenotypic clinical data to allow for relevant adjustments and subgroup analyses to be conducted for better precision.A recent pre-print study by Zhang and colleagues examined the polygenicity and potential for SNP-based risk prediction for 14 common cancers, including endometrial cancer, using available summary-level data from European-ancestry datasets.46 They estimated that there are just over 1000 independent endometrial cancer susceptibility SNPs, and that a PRS comprising all such SNPs would have an area under the receiver-operator curve of 0.64, similar to that predicted for ovarian cancer, but lower than that for the other cancers in the study. The modelling in the paper suggests that an endometrial cancer GWAS double the size of the current largest study would be able to identify susceptibility SNPs together explaining 40% of the genetic variance, but that in order to explain 75% of the genetic variance it would be necessary to have a GWAS comprising close to 150 000 cases and controls, far in excess of what is currently feasible.We found that the literature consists mainly of candidate-gene studies with small sample sizes, meta-analyses reporting conflicting results despite using the same set of primary articles, and multiple reports of significant SNPs that have not been validated by any larger GWAS. The candidate-gene studies were indeed the most useful and cheaper technique available until the mid to late 2000s.

However, a lack of reproducibility (particularly due to population stratification and reporting bias), uncertainty of reported associations, and considerably high false discovery rates make these studies much less appropriate in the post-GWAS era. Unlike the candidate-gene approach, GWAS do not require prior knowledge, selection of genes or SNPs, and provide vast amounts of data. Furthermore, both the genotyping process and data analysis phases have become cheaper, the latter particularly due to faster and open-access pre-phasing and imputation tools being made available.It is clear from table 1 that some SNPs were reported with wide 95% CI, which can be directly attributed to small sample sizes particularly when restricting the cases to non-endometrioid histology only, low EAF or poor imputation quality. Thus, these should be interpreted with caution.

Additionally, most of the SNPs reported by candidate-gene studies were not detected by the largest GWAS to date conducted by O’Mara et al.21 However, this does not necessarily mean that the possibility of those SNPs being relevant should be completely dismissed. Moreover, meta-analyses were attempted for other variants. However, these showed no statistically significant association and many presented with high heterogeneity between the respective studies (data not shown). Furthermore, as many studies utilised the same set of cases and/or controls, conducting a meta-analysis was not possible for a good number of SNPs.

It is therefore unequivocal that the literature is crowded with numerous small candidate-gene studies and conflicting data. This makes it particularly hard to detect novel SNPs and conduct meaningful meta-analyses.We found convincing evidence for 19 variants that indicated the strongest association with endometrial cancer, as shown in table 1. The associations between endometrial cancer and variants in or around HNF1B, CYP19A1, SOX4, MYC, KLF and EIF2AK found in earlier GWAS were then replicated in the latest and largest GWAS. These SNPs showed promising potential in a theoretical PRS we devised based on published data.

Using all 24 or genome-wide significant SNPs only, women with a PRS in the top 1% of the distribution would be predicted to have a risk of endometrial cancer 3.16 and 2.09 times higher than the mean risk, respectively.However, the importance of these variants and relevance of the proximate genes in a functional or biological context is challenging to evaluate. Long distance promoter regulation by enhancers may disguise the genuine target gene. In addition, enhancers often do not loop to the nearest gene, further complicating the relevance of nearby gene(s) to a GWAS hit. In order to elucidate biologically relevant candidate target genes in endometrial cancer, O’Mara et al looked into promoter-associated chromatin looping using a modern HiChIP approach.47 The authors utilised normal and tumoural endometrial cell lines for this analysis which showed significant enrichment for endometrial cancer heritability, with 103 candidate target genes identified across the 13 risk loci identified by the largest ECAC GWAS.

Notable genes identified here were CDKN2A and WT1, and their antisense counterparts. The former was reported to be nearby of rs1679014 and the latter of rs10835920, as shown in table 1. Moreover, of the 36 candidate target genes, 17 were found to be downregulated while 19 were upregulated in endometrial tumours.The authors also investigated overlap between the 13 endometrial cancer risk loci and top eQTL variants for each target gene.47 In whole blood, of the two particular lead SNPs, rs8822380 at 17q21.32 was a top eQTL for SNX11 and HOXB2, whereas rs937213 at 15q15.1 was a top eQTL for SRP14. In endometrial tumour, rs7579014 at 2p16.1 was found to be a top eQTL for BCL11A.

This is particularly interesting because BCL11A was the only nearby/candidate gene that had a GWAS association reported in both endometrioid and non-endometrioid subtypes. The study looked at protein–protein interactions between endometrial cancer drivers and candidate target gene products. Significant interactions were observed with TP53 (most significant), AKT, PTEN, ESR1 and KRAS, among others. Finally, when 103 target candidate genes and 387 proteins were combined together, 462 pathways were found to be significantly enriched.

Many of these are related to gene regulation, cancer, obesity, insulinaemia and oestrogen exposure. This study clearly showed a potential biological relevance for some of the SNPs reported by ECAC GWAS in 2018.Most of the larger included studies used cohorts primarily composed of women of broad European descent. Hence, there are negligible data available for other ethnicities, particularly African women. This is compounded by the lack of reference genotype data available for comparative analysis, making it harder for research to be conducted in ethnicities other than Europeans.

This poses a problem for developing risk prediction models that are equally valuable and predictive across populations. Thus, our results also are of limited applicability to non-European populations.Furthermore, considering that non-endometrioid cases comprise a small proportion (~20%) of all endometrial cancer cases, much larger cohort sizes are needed to detect any genuine signals for non-endometrioid tumours. Most of the evaluated studies looked at either overall/mixed endometrial cancer subtypes or endometrioid histology, and those that looked at variant associations with non-endometrioid histology were unlikely to have enough power to detect any signal with statistical significance. This is particularly concerning because non-endometrioid subtypes are biologically aggressive tumours with a much poorer prognosis that contribute disproportionately to mortality from endometrial cancer.

It is particularly important that attempts to improve early detection and prevention of endometrial cancer focus primarily on improving outcomes from these subtypes. It is also worth noting that, despite the current shift towards a molecular classification of endometrial cancer, most studies used the overarching classical Bokhman’s classification system, type I versus type II, or no histological classification system at all. Therefore, it is important to create and follow a standardised and comprehensive classification system for reporting tumour subtypes for future studies.This study compiled and presented available information for an extensively studied, yet unproven in large datasets, SNP309 variant in MDM2. Currently, there is no convincing evidence for an association between this variant and endometrial cancer risk.

Additionally, of all the studies, only one accounted for the opposing effect of a nearby variant SNP285 in their analyses. Thus, we conclude that until confirmed by a sufficiently large GWAS, this variant should not be considered significant in influencing the risk of endometrial cancer and therefore not included in a PRS. This is also true for the majority of the SNPs reported in candidate-gene studies, as the numbers fall far short of being able to detect genuine signals.This systematic review presents the most up-to-date evidence for endometrial cancer susceptibility variants, emphasising the need for further large-scale studies to identify more variants of importance, and validation of these associations. Until data from larger and more diverse cohorts are available, the top 24 SNPs presented here are the most robust common genetic variants that affect endometrial cancer risk.

The multiplicative effects of these SNPs could be used in a PRS to allow personalised risk prediction models to be developed for targeted screening and prevention interventions for women at greatest risk of endometrial cancer..

IntroductionIn recent http://www.jamiegianna.com/2019/11/18/untitled-reusable-block/ years, many studies have been published on new diagnostic possibilities and management approaches in cohorts of patients suspected to how to buy cheap viagra have a disorder/difference of sex development (DSD).1–13 Based on these studies, it has become clear that services and institutions still differ in the composition of the multidisciplinary teams that provide care for patients who have a DSD.11 14 Several projects have now worked to resolve this variability in care. The European Cooperation in Science and Technology (EU COST) action BM1303 ‘A systematic elucidation of differences of sex development’ has been a platform to achieve European agreement on harmonisation of clinical management and laboratory practices.15–17 Another such initiative involved an update of the 2006 DSD consensus document how to buy cheap viagra by an international group of professionals and patient representatives.18 These initiatives have highlighted how cultural and financial aspects and the availability of resources differ significantly between countries and societies, a situation that hampers supranational agreement on common diagnostic protocols. As only a few national guidelines have been published in international journals, comparison of these guidelines is difficult even though such a comparison is necessary to capture the differences and initiate actions to overcome them. Nonetheless, four DSD (expert) centres located in the Netherlands and Flanders (the Dutch-speaking Northern part of Belgium) have collaborated to produce a detailed guideline on diagnostics in DSD.19 This shows that a supranational guideline can be a reasonable approach for countries with similarly structured healthcare how to buy cheap viagra systems and similar resources. Within the guideline there is agreement that optimisation of expertise and care can be achieved through centralisation, for example, by limiting analysis of next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based diagnostic panels to only a few centres and by centralising pathological review of gonadal tissues.

International networks such as the European Reference Network for rare endocrine conditions (EndoERN), in which DSD is embedded, may facilitate the expansion of this kind how to buy cheap viagra of collaboration across Europe.This paper highlights key discussion points in the Dutch-Flemish guideline that have been insufficiently addressed in the literature thus far because they reflect evolving technologies or less visible stakeholders. For example, prenatal observation of an atypical aspect of the genitalia indicating a possible DSD is becoming increasingly common, and we discuss appropriate counselling and a diagnostic approach for these cases, including the option of using NGS-based genetic testing. So far, little attention has been paid to this process.20 21 Furthermore, informing patients and/or their parents about atypical sex development and why this may how to buy cheap viagra warrant referral to a specialised team may be challenging, especially for professionals with limited experience in DSD.22 23 Therefore, a section of the Dutch-Flemish guideline was written for these healthcare providers. Moreover, this enables DSD specialists to refer to the guideline when advising a referral. Transition from the prenatal to the postnatal team and from the paediatric how to buy cheap viagra to the adult team requires optimal communication between the specialists involved.

Application of NGS-based techniques may lead to a higher diagnostic yield, providing a molecular genetic diagnosis in previously unsolved cases.16 We address the timing of this testing and the problems associated with this technique such as the interpretation of variants of unknown clinical significance (VUS). Similarly, histopathological how to buy cheap viagra interpretation and classification of removed gonadal tissue is challenging and would benefit from international collaboration and centralisation of expertise.MethodsFor the guideline revision, an interdisciplinary multicentre group was formed with all members responsible for updating the literature for a specific part of the guideline. Literature search in PubMed was not systematic, but rather intended to be broad in order to cover all areas and follow expert opinions. This approach is how to buy cheap viagra more in line with the Clinical Practice Advisory Document method described by Burke et al24 for guidelines involving genetic practice because it is often troublesome to substantiate such guidelines with sufficient evidence due to the rapid changes in testing methods, for example, gene panels. All input provided by the group was synthesised by the chairperson (YvB), who also reviewed abstracts of papers on DSD published between 2010 and September 2017 for the guideline and up to October 2019 for this paper.

Abstracts had to be written in English and were identified using a broad range of Medical how to buy cheap viagra Subject Headings terms (eg, DSD, genetic, review, diagnosis, diagnostics, 46,XX DSD, 46,XY DSD, guideline, multidisciplinary care). Next, potentially relevant papers on diagnostic procedures in DSD were selected. Case reports were excluded, as were articles that were how to buy cheap viagra not open access or retrievable through institutional access. Based on this, a draft guideline was produced that was in line with the international principles of good diagnostic care in DSD. This draft was discussed by the writing committee and, after having obtained agreement on remaining points of discussion, revised into a final how to buy cheap viagra draft.

This version was sent to a broad group of professionals from academic centres and DSD teams whose members had volunteered to review the draft guideline. After receiving and incorporating their how to buy cheap viagra input, the final version was presented to the paediatric and genetic associations for approval. After approval by the members of the paediatric (NVK), clinical genetic (VKGN) and genetic laboratory (VKGL) associations, the guideline was published on their respective websites.19 Although Turner syndrome and Klinefelter syndrome are considered to be part of the DSD spectrum, they are not extensively discussed in this diagnostic guideline as guidelines dedicated to these syndromes already exist.25 26 However, some individuals with Turner syndrome or Klinefelter syndrome may present with ambiguous or atypical genitalia and may therefore initially follow the DSD diagnostic process.Guideline highlightsPrenatal settingPresentationThe most frequent prenatal presentation of a DSD condition is atypical genitalia found on prenatal ultrasound as an isolated finding or in combination with other structural anomalies. This usually occurs after the 20-week routine medical ultrasound for screening of congenital anomalies, but may also occur earlier, for example, when a commercial ultrasound is performed at the request of the parents.Another way DSD can be diagnosed before birth is when invasive prenatal genetic testing carried out for a different reason, for example, due to suspicion of other structural anomalies, reveals a discrepancy between the genotypic sex and the phenotypic sex how to buy cheap viagra seen by ultrasound. In certified laboratories, the possibility of a sample switch is extremely low but should be ruled out immediately.

More often, the discrepancy will be due to sex-chromosome mosaicism or a true form of DSD.A situation now occurring with increasing frequency is a discrepancy between the genotypic sex revealed by non-invasive prenatal testing how to buy cheap viagra (NIPT), which is now available to high-risk pregnant women in the Netherlands and to all pregnant women in Belgium, and later ultrasound findings. NIPT screens for CNVs in the fetus. However, depending on legal restrictions and/or ethical considerations, the X and Y chromosomes are not always included in NIPT analysis and reports how to buy cheap viagra. If the X and Y chromosomes are included, it is important to realise that the presence of a Y-chromosome does not necessarily imply male fetal development. At the time that NIPT is performed (usually 11–13 weeks), genital development cannot be reliably appreciated by ultrasound, so any discrepancy or atypical aspect of the genitalia will only be noticed later in pregnancy and should prompt further evaluation.Counselling and diagnosticsIf a DSD is suspected, first-line sonographers and obstetricians should refer the couple to their colleague prenatal specialists how to buy cheap viagra working with or in a DSD team.

After confirming an atypical genital on ultrasound, the specialist team should offer the couple a referral for genetic counselling to discuss the possibility of performing invasive prenatal testing (usually an amniocentesis) to identify an underlying cause that fits the ultrasound findings.22 23 To enable the parents to make a well-informed decision, prenatal counselling should, in our opinion, include. Information on the ultrasound how to buy cheap viagra findings and the limitations of this technique. The procedure(s) that can be followed, including the risks associated with an amniocentesis. And the type of information genetic testing can and cannot how to buy cheap viagra provide. Knowing which information has been provided and what words have been used by the prenatal specialist is very helpful for those involved in postnatal care.It is important that parents understand that the biological sex of a baby is determined by a complex interplay of chromosomes, genes and hormones, and thus that assessment of the presence or absence of a Y-chromosome alone is insufficient to assign the sex of their unborn child or, as in any unborn child, say anything about the child’s future gender identity.Expecting parents can be counselled by the clinical geneticist and the psychologist from the DSD team, although other DSD specialists can also be involved.

The clinical geneticist should be experienced in prenatal counselling and well informed about the diagnostic possibilities given the limited time span in which test results need to be available to allow parents to make a well-informed decision about whether or how to buy cheap viagra not to continue the pregnancy. Termination of pregnancy can be considered, for instance, in a syndromic form of DSD with multiple malformations, but when the DSD occurs as an apparently isolated condition, expecting parents may also consider termination of pregnancy, which, although considered controversial by some, is legal in Belgium how to buy cheap viagra and the Netherlands. The psychologist of the DSD team can support parents during and after pregnancy and help them cope with feelings of uncertainty and eventual considerations of a termination of pregnancy, as well as with practical issues, for example, how to inform others. The stress of not knowing exactly what the child’s genitalia will look like and how to buy cheap viagra uncertainty about the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis cannot be avoided completely. Parents are informed that if the postnatal phenotype is different from what was prenatally expected, the advice given about diagnostic testing can be adjusted accordingly, for example, if a hypospadias is milder than was expected based on prenatal ultrasound images.

In our experience, parents appreciate having already spoken to some members of the DSD team during pregnancy and having a contact person before birth.After expert prenatal counselling, a significant number of pregnant couples decline prenatal testing (personal experience IALG, MK, ABD, YvB, MC and HC-vdG) how to buy cheap viagra. At birth, umbilical cord blood is a good source for (molecular) karyotyping and storage of DNA and can be obtained by the obstetrician, midwife or neonatologist. The terminology used in communication with parents should be carefully chosen,22 23 and midwives and staff of neonatal and delivery units should be clearly instructed to use gender-neutral how to buy cheap viagra and non-stigmatising vocabulary (eg, ‘your baby’) as long as sex assignment is pending.An algorithm for diagnostic evaluation of a suspected DSD in the prenatal situation is proposed in figure 1. When couples opt for invasive prenatal diagnosis, the genetic analysis usually involves an (SNP)-array. It was recently estimated that >30% of individuals who have a DSD have additional structural how to buy cheap viagra anomalies, with cardiac and neurological anomalies and fetal growth restriction being particularly common.27 28 If additional anomalies are seen, the geneticist can consider specific gene defects that may underlie a known genetic syndrome or carry out NGS.

NGS-based techniques have also now made their appearance in prenatal diagnosis of congenital anomalies.29 30 Panels using these techniques can be specific for genes involved in DSD, or be larger panels covering multiple congenital anomalies, and are usually employed with trio-analysis to compare variants identified in the child with the parents’ genetics.29–31 Finding a genetic cause before delivery can help reduce parental stress in the neonatal period and speed up decisions regarding gender assignment. In such cases there is no tight time limit, and we propose completing the analysis well before the expected delivery.Disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the prenatal setting how to buy cheap viagra. A diagnostic algorithm. *SOX9. Upstream anomalies and balanced translocations at promotor sites!.

Conventional karyotyping can be useful. NGS, next-generation sequencing." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 1 Disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the prenatal setting. A diagnostic algorithm. *SOX9. Upstream anomalies and balanced translocations at promotor sites!.

Conventional karyotyping can be useful. NGS, next-generation sequencing.First contact by a professional less experienced in DSDWhereas most current guidelines start from the point when an individual has been referred to the DSD team,1 15 the Dutch-Flemish guideline dedicates a chapter to healthcare professionals less experienced in DSD as they are often the first to suspect or identify such a condition. Apart from the paper of Indyk,7 little guidance is available for these professionals about how to act in such a situation. The chapter in the Dutch-Flemish guideline summarises the various clinical presentations that a DSD can have and provides information on how to communicate with parents and/or patients about the findings of the physical examination, the first-line investigations and the need for prompt referral to a specialised centre for further evaluation. Clinical examples are offered to illustrate some of these recurring situations.

The medical issues in DSD can be very challenging, and the social and psychological impact is high. For neonates with ambiguous genitalia, sex assignment is an urgent and crucial issue, and it is mandatory that parents are informed that it is possible to postpone registration of their child’s sex. In cases where sex assignment has already taken place, the message that the development of the gonads or genitalia is still atypical is complicated and distressing for patients and parents or carers. A list of contact details for DSD centres and patient organisations in the Netherlands and Flanders is attached to the Dutch-Flemish guideline. Publishing such a list, either in guidelines or online, can help healthcare professionals find the nearest centres for consultations and provide patients and patient organisations with an overview of the centres where expertise is available.Timing and place of genetic testing using NGS-based gene panelsThe diagnostic workup that is proposed for 46,XX and 46,XY DSD is shown in figures 2 and 3, respectively.

Even with the rapidly expanding molecular possibilities, a (family) history and a physical examination remain the essential first steps in the diagnostic process. Biochemical and hormonal screening aim at investigating serum electrolytes, renal function and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axes. Ultrasound screening of kidneys and internal genitalia, as well as establishing genotypic sex, should be accomplished within 48 hours and complete the baseline diagnostic work-up of a child born with ambiguous genitalia.1 16 32 3346,XX disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the postnatal setting. A diagnostic algorithm. NGS, next-generation sequencing.

CAH, Congenital adrenal hyperplasia. AMH, Anti-Müllerian Hormone." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 2 46,XX disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the postnatal setting. A diagnostic algorithm. NGS, next-generation sequencing. CAH, Congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

AMH, Anti-Müllerian Hormone.46,XY disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the postnatal setting. A diagnostic algorithm. * SOX9. Upstream anomalies and balanced translocations at promotor sites!. Conventional karyotyping can be useful.

NGS, next-generation sequencing." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 3 46,XY disorders/differences of sex development (DSD) in the postnatal setting. A diagnostic algorithm. *SOX9. Upstream anomalies and balanced translocations at promotor sites!. Conventional karyotyping can be useful.

NGS, next-generation sequencing.Very recently, a European position paper has been published focusing on the genetic workup of DSD.16 It highlights the limitations and drawbacks of NGS-based tests, which include the chance of missing subtle structural variants such as CNVs and mosaicism and the fact that NGS cannot detect methylation defects or other epigenetic changes.16 28 31 Targeted DNA analysis is preferred in cases where hormonal investigations suggest a block in steroidogenesis (eg, 11-β-hydroxylase deficiency, 21-hydroxylase deficiency), or in the context of a specific clinical constellation such as the often coincidental finding of Müllerian structures in a boy with normal external genitalia or cryptorchidism, that is, persistent Müllerian duct syndrome.33 34 Alternative tests should also be considered depending on the available information. Sometimes, a simple mouth swab for FISH analysis can detect mosaic XY/X in a male with hypospadias or asymmetric gonadal development or in a female with little or no Turner syndrome stigmata and a normal male molecular karyotyping profile or peripheral blood karyotype. Such targeted testing avoids incidental findings and is cheaper and faster than analysis of a large NGS-based panel, although the cost difference is rapidly declining.However, due to the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of DSD conditions, the most cost-effective next steps in the majority of cases are whole exome sequencing followed by panel analysis of genes involved in genital development and function or trio-analysis of a large gene panel (such as a Mendeliome).16 35–38 Pretest genetic counselling involves discussing what kind of information will be reported to patients or parents and the chance of detecting VUS, and the small risk of incidental findings when analysing a DSD panel should be mentioned. Laboratories also differ in what class of variants they report.39 In our experience, the fear of incidental findings is a major reason why some parents refrain from genetic testing.Timing of the DSD gene panel analysis is also important. While some patients or parents prefer that all diagnostic procedures be performed as soon as possible, others need time to reflect on the complex information related to more extensive genetic testing and on its possible consequences.

If parents or patients do not consent to panel-based genetic testing, analysis of specific genes, such as WT1, should be considered when appropriate in view of the clinical consequences if a mutation is present (eg, clinical surveillance of renal function and screening for Wilms’ tumour in the case of WT1 mutations). Genes that are more frequently involved in DSD (eg, SRY, NR5A1) and that match the specific clinical and hormonal features in a given patient could also be considered for sequencing. Targeted gene analysis may also be preferred in centres located in countries that do not have the resources or technical requirements to perform NGS panel-based genetic testing. Alternatively, participation by these centres in international collaborative networks may allow them to outsource the molecular genetic workup abroad.Gene panels differ between centres and are regularly updated based on scientific progress. A comparison of DSD gene panels used in recent studies can be found at https://www.nature.com/articles/s41574-018-0010-8%23Sec46.15 The panels currently used at the coauthors’ institutions can be found on their respective websites.

Given the pace of change, it is important to regularly consider repeating analysis in patients with an unexplained DSD, for example, when they transition into adult care or when they move from one centre to another. This also applies to patients in whom a clinical diagnosis has never been genetically confirmed. Confusion may arise when the diagnosis cannot be confirmed or when a mutation is identified in a different gene, for example, NR5A1 in someone with a clinical diagnosis of CAIS that has other consequences for relatives. Hence, new genetic counselling should always accompany new diagnostic endeavours.Class 3 variants and histopathological examinationsThe rapidly evolving diagnostic possibilities raise new questions. What do laboratories report?.

How should we deal with the frequent findings of mainly unique VUS or class 3 variants (ACMG recommendation) in the many different DSD-related genes in the diagnostic setting?. Reporting VUS can be a source of uncertainty for parents, but not reporting these variants precludes further investigations to determine their possible pathogenicity. It can also be difficult to prove variant pathogenicity, both on gene-level and variant-level.39 Moreover, given the gonad-specific expression of some genes and the variable phenotypic spectrum and reduced penetrance, segregation analysis is not always informative. A class 3 variant that does not fit the clinical presentation may be unrelated to the observed phenotype, but it could also represent a newly emerging phenotype. This was recently demonstrated by the identification of the NR5A1 mutation, R92W, in individuals with 46,XX testicular and ovotesticular DSD.40 This gene had previously been associated with 46,XY DSD.

In diagnostic laboratories, there is usually no capacity or expertise to conduct large-scale functional studies to determine pathogenicity of these unique class 3 VUS in the different genes involved in DSD. Functional validation of variants identified in novel genes may be more attractive in a research context. However, for individual families with VUS in well-established DSD genes such as AR or HSD17B3, functional analysis may provide a confirmed diagnosis that implies for relatives the option of undergoing their own DNA analysis and estimating the genetic risk of their own future offspring. This makes genetic follow-up important in these cases and demonstrates the usefulness of international databases and networks and the centralisation of functional studies of genetic variants in order to reduce costs and maximise expertise.The same is true for histopathological description, germ-cell tumour risk assessment in specific forms of DSD and classification of gonadal samples. Germ-cell tumour risk is related to the type of DSD (among other factors), but it is impossible to make risk estimates in individual cases.41–44 Gonadectomy may be indicated in cases with high-risk dysgenetic abdominal gonads that cannot be brought into a stable superficial (ie, inguinal, labioscrotal) position that allows clinical or radiological surveillance, or to avoid virilisation due to 5-alpha reductase deficiency in a 46,XY girl with a stable female gender identity.45 Pathological examination of DSD gonads requires specific expertise.

For example, the differentiation between benign germ cell abnormalities, such as delayed maturation and (pre)malignant development of germ cells, is crucial for clinical management but can be very troublesome.46 Centralised pathological examination of gonadal biopsy and gonadectomy samples in one centre, or a restricted number of centres, on a national scale can help to overcome the problem of non-uniform classification and has proven feasible in the Netherlands and Belgium. We therefore believe that uniform assessment and classification of gonadal differentiation patterns should also be addressed in guidelines on DSD management.International databases of gonadal tissues are crucial for learning more about the risk of malignancy in different forms of DSD, but they are only reliable if uniform criteria for histological classification are strictly applied.46 These criteria could be incorporated in many existing networks such as the I-DSD consortium, the Disorders of Sex Development Translational Research Network, the European Reference Network on Urogenital Diseases (eUROGEN), the EndoERN and COST actions.15–17 47Communication at the transition from paediatric to adult carePaediatric and adult teams need to collaborate closely to facilitate a well-organised transition from paediatric to adult specialist care.15 48–50 Both teams need to exchange information optimally and should consider transition as a longitudinal process rather than a fixed moment in time. Age-appropriate information is key at all ages, and an overview of topics to be discussed at each stage is described by Cools et al.15 Table 1 shows an example of how transition can be organised.View this table:Table 1 Example of transition table as used in the DSD clinic of the Erasmus Medical CenterPsychological support and the continued provision of information remains important for individuals with a DSD at all ages.15 22 In addition to the information given by the DSD team members, families and patients can benefit from resources such as support groups and information available on the internet.47 Information available online should be checked for accuracy and completeness when referring patients and parents to internet sites.Recommendations for future actionsMost guidelines and articles on the diagnosis and management of DSD are aimed at specialists and are only published in specialist journals or on websites for endocrinologists, urologists or geneticists. Yet there is a need for guidelines directed towards first-line and second-line healthcare workers that summarise the recommendations about the first crucial steps in the management of DSD. These should be published in widely available general medical journals and online, along with a national list of DSD centres.

Furthermore, DSD (expert) centres should provide continuous education to all those who may be involved in the identification of individuals with a DSD in order to enable these healthcare professionals to recognise atypical genitalia, to promptly refer individuals who have a DSD and to inform the patient and parents about this and subsequent diagnostic procedures.As DSD continues to be a rare condition, it will take time to evaluate the effects of having such a guideline on the preparedness of first-line and second-line healthcare workers to recognise DSD conditions. One way to evaluate this might be the development and use of questionnaires asking patients, carers and families and referring physicians how satisfied they were with the initial medical consultation and referral and what could be improved. A helpful addition to existing international databases that collect information on genetic variations would be a list of centres that offer suitable functional studies for certain genes, ideally covering the most frequently mutated genes (at minimum).Patient organisations can also play an important role in informing patients about newly available diagnostic or therapeutic strategies and options, and their influence and specific role has now been recognised and discussed in several publications.17 47 However, it should be kept in mind that these organisations do not represent all patients, as a substantial number of patients and parents are not member of such an organisation.Professionals have to provide optimal medical care based on well-established evidence, or at least on broad consensus. Yet not everything can be regulated by recommendations and guidelines. Options, ideas and wishes should be openly discussed between professionals, patients and families within their confidential relationship.

This will enable highly individualised holistic care tailored to the patient’s needs and expectations. Once they are well-informed of all available options, parents and/or patients can choose what they consider the optimal care for their children or themselves.15 16ConclusionThe Dutch-Flemish guideline uniquely addresses some topics that are under-represented in the literature, thus adding some key aspects to those addressed in recent consensus papers and guidelines.15–17 33 47As more children with a DSD are now being identified prenatally, and the literature on prenatal diagnosis of DSD remains scarce,20 21 we propose a prenatal diagnostic algorithm and emphasise the importance of having a prenatal specialist involved in or collaborating with DSD (expert) centres.We also stress that good communication between all involved parties is essential. Professionals should be well informed about protocols and communication. Collaboration between centres is necessary to optimise aspects of care such as uniform interpretation of gonadal pathology and functional testing of class 3 variants found by genetic testing. Guidelines can provide a framework within which individualised patient care should be discussed with all stakeholders.AcknowledgmentsThe authors would like to thank the colleagues of the DSD teams for their input in and critical reading of the Dutch-Flemish guideline.

Amsterdam University Center (AMC and VU), Maastricht University Medical Center, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen, University Medical Center Groningen, University Medical Center Utrecht, Ghent University Hospital. The authors would like to thank Kate McIntyre for editing the revised manuscript and Tom de Vries Lentsch for providing the figures as a PDF. Three of the authors of this publication are members of the European Reference Network for rare endocrine diseases—Project ID 739543.IntroductionEndometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological malignancy in the developed world.1 Its incidence has risen over the last two decades as a consequence of the ageing population, fewer hysterectomies for benign disease and the obesity epidemic. In the USA, it is estimated that women have a 1 in 35 lifetime risk of endometrial cancer, and in contrast to cancers of most other sites, cancer-specific mortality has risen by approximately 2% every year since 2008 related to the rapidly rising incidence.2Endometrial cancer has traditionally been classified into type I and type II based on morphology.3 The more common subtype, type I, is mostly comprised of endometrioid tumours and is oestrogen-driven, arises from a hyperplastic endometrium, presents at an early stage and has an excellent 5 year survival rate.4 By contrast, type II includes non-endometrioid tumours, specifically serous, carcinosarcoma and clear cell subtypes, which are biologically aggressive tumours with a poor prognosis that are often diagnosed at an advanced stage.5 Recent efforts have focused on a molecular classification system for more accurate categorisation of endometrial tumours into four groups with distinct prognostic profiles.6 7The majority of endometrial http://ilovepte.com/why-pte/ cancers arise through the interplay of familial, genetic and lifestyle factors. Two inherited cancer predisposition syndromes, Lynch syndrome and the much rarer Cowden syndrome, substantially increase the lifetime risk of endometrial cancer, but these only account for around 3–5% of cases.8–10 Having first or second degree relative(s) with endometrial or colorectal cancer increases endometrial cancer risk, although a large European twin study failed to demonstrate a strong heritable link.11 The authors failed to show that there was greater concordance in monozygotic than dizygotic twins, but the study was based on relatively small numbers of endometrial cancers.

Lu and colleagues reported an association between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and endometrial cancer risk, revealing the potential role of SNPs in explaining part of the risk in both the familial and general populations.12 Thus far, many SNPs have been reported to modify susceptibility to endometrial cancer. However, much of this work predated genome wide association studies and is of variable quality. Understanding genetic predisposition to endometrial cancer could facilitate personalised risk assessment with a view to targeted prevention and screening interventions.13 This emerged as the most important unanswered research question in endometrial cancer according to patients, carers and healthcare professionals in our recently completed James Lind Womb Cancer Alliance Priority Setting Partnership.14 It would be particularly useful for non-endometrioid endometrial cancers, for which advancing age is so far the only predictor.15We therefore conducted a comprehensive systematic review of the literature to provide an overview of the relationship between SNPs and endometrial cancer risk. We compiled a list of the most robust endometrial cancer-associated SNPs. We assessed the applicability of this panel of SNPs with a theoretical polygenic risk score (PRS) calculation.

We also critically appraised the meta-analyses investigating the most frequently reported SNPs in MDM2. Finally, we described all SNPs reported within genes and pathways that are likely involved in endometrial carcinogenesis and metastasis.MethodsOur systematic review follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) collaboration 2009 recommendations. The registered protocol is available through PROSPERO (CRD42018091907).16Search strategyWe searched Embase, MEDLINE and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases via the Healthcare Databases Advanced Search (HDAS) platform, from 2007 to 2018, to identify studies reporting associations between polymorphisms and endometrial cancer risk. Key words including MeSH (Medical Subject Heading) terms and free-text words were searched in both titles and abstracts. The following terms were used.

€œendomet*”,“uter*”, “womb”, “cancer(s)”, “neoplasm(s)”, “endometrium tumour”, “carcinoma”, “adenosarcoma”, “clear cell carcinoma”, “carcinosarcoma”, “SNP”, “single nucleotide polymorphism”, “GWAS”, and “genome-wide association study/ies”. No other restrictions were applied. The search was repeated with time restrictions between 2018 and June 2019 to capture any recent publications.Eligibility criteriaStudies were selected for full-text evaluation if they were primary articles investigating a relationship between endometrial cancer and SNPs. Study outcome was either the increased or decreased risk of endometrial cancer relative to controls reported as an odds ratio (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs).Study selectionThree independent reviewers screened all articles uploaded to a screening spreadsheet developed by Helena VonVille.17 Disagreements were resolved by discussion. Chronbach’s α score was calculated between reviewers and indicated high consistency at 0.92.

Case–control, prospective and retrospective studies, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and both discovery and validation studies were selected for full-text evaluation. Non-English articles, editorials, conference abstracts and proceedings, letters and correspondence, case reports and review articles were excluded.Candidate-gene studies with at least 100 women and GWAS with at least 1000 women in the case arm were selected to ensure reliability of the results, as explained by Spencer et al.18 To construct a panel of up to 30 SNPs with the strongest evidence of association, those with the strongest p values were selected. For the purpose of an SNP panel, articles utilising broad European or multi-ethnic cohorts were selected. Where overlapping populations were identified, the most comprehensive study was included.Data extraction and synthesisFor each study, the following data were extracted. SNP ID, nearby gene(s)/chromosome location, OR (95% CI), p value, minor or effect allele frequency (MAF/EAF), EA (effect allele) and OA (other allele), adjustment, ethnicity and ancestry, number of cases and controls, endometrial cancer type, and study type including discovery or validation study and meta-analysis.

For risk estimates, a preference towards most adjusted results was applied. For candidate-gene studies, a standard p value of<0.05 was applied and for GWAS a p value of <5×10-8, indicating genome-wide significance, was accepted as statistically significant. However, due to the limited number of SNPs with p values reaching genome-wide significance, this threshold was then lowered to <1×10-5, allowing for marginally significant SNPs to be included. As shown by Mavaddat et al, for breast cancer, SNPs that fall below genome-wide significance may still be useful for generating a PRS and improving the models.19We estimated the potential value of a PRS based on the most significant SNPs by comparing the predicted risk for a woman with a risk score in the top 1% of the distribution to the mean predicted risk. Per-allele ORs and MAFs were taken from the publications and standard errors (SEs) for the lnORs were derived from published 95% CIs.

The PRS was assumed to have a Normal distribution, with mean 2∑βipI and SE, σ, equal to √2∑βi2pI(1−pi), according to the binomial distribution, where the summation is over all SNPs in the risk score. Hence the relative risk (RR) comparing the top 1% of the distribution to the mean is given by exp(Z0.01σ), where Z is the inverse of the standard normal cumulative distribution.ResultsThe flow chart of study selection is illustrated in figure 1. In total, 453 text articles were evaluated and, of those, 149 articles met our inclusion criteria. One study was excluded from table 1, for having an Asian-only population, as this would make it harder to compare with the rest of the results which were all either multi-ethnic or Caucasian cohorts, as stated in our inclusion criteria for the SNP panel.20 Any SNPs without 95% CIs were also excluded from any downstream analysis. Additionally, SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (r2 >0.2) with each other were examined, and of those in linkage disequilibrium, the SNP with strongest association was reported.

Per allele ORs were used unless stated otherwise.View this table:Table 1 List of top SNPs most likely to contribute to endometrial cancer risk identified through systematic review of recent literature21–25Study selection flow diagram. *Reasons. Irrelevant articles, articles focusing on other conditions, non-GWAS/candidate-gene study related articles, technical and duplicate articles. GWAS, genome-wide association study. Adapted from.

Moher D, Liberati A, Tetzlaff J, Altman DG, The PRISMA Group (2009). Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. The PRISMA Statement. PLoS Med 6(6). E1000097.

Doi:10.1371/journal.pmed1000097." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 1 Study selection flow diagram. *Reasons. Irrelevant articles, articles focusing on other conditions, non-GWAS/candidate-gene study related articles, technical and duplicate articles. GWAS, genome-wide association study. Adapted from.

Moher D, Liberati A, Tetzlaff J, Altman DG, The PRISMA Group (2009). Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. The PRISMA Statement. PLoS Med 6(6). E1000097.

Doi:10.1371/journal.pmed1000097.Top SNPs associated with endometrial cancer riskFollowing careful interpretation of the data, 24 independent SNPs with the lowest p values that showed the strongest association with endometrial cancer were obtained (table 1).21–25 These SNPs are located in or around genes coding for transcription factors, cell growth and apoptosis regulators, and enzymes involved in the steroidogenesis pathway. All the SNPs presented here were reported on the basis of a GWAS or in one case, an exome-wide association study, and hence no SNPs from candidate-gene studies made it to the list. This is partly due to the nature of larger GWAS providing more comprehensive and powered results as opposed to candidate gene studies. Additionally, a vast majority of SNPs reported by candidate-gene studies were later refuted by large-scale GWAS such as in the case of TERT and MDM2 variants.26 27 The exception to this is the CYP19 gene, where candidate-gene studies reported an association between variants in this gene with endometrial cancer in both Asian and broad European populations, and this association was more recently confirmed by large-scale GWAS.21 28–30 Moreover, a recent article authored by O’Mara and colleagues reviewed the GWAS that identified most of the currently known SNPs associated with endometrial cancer.31Most of the studies represented in table 1 are GWAS and the majority of these involved broad European populations. Those having a multi-ethnic cohort also consisted primarily of broad European populations.

Only four of the variants in table 1 are located in coding regions of a gene, or in regulatory flanking regions around the gene. Thus, most of these variants would not be expected to cause any functional effects on the gene or the resulting protein. An eQTL search using GTEx Portal showed that some of the SNPs are significantly associated (p<0.05) with modified transcription levels of the respective genes in various tissues such as prostate (rs11263761), thyroid (rs9668337), pituitary (rs2747716), breast mammary (rs882380) and testicular (rs2498794) tissue, as summarised in table 2.View this table:Table 2 List of eQTL hits for the selected panel of SNPsThe only variant for which there was an indication of a specific association with non-endometrioid endometrial cancer was rs148261157 near the BCL11A gene. The A allele of this SNP had a moderately higher association in the non-endometrioid arm (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.04. P=9.6×10-6) compared with the endometrioid arm (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.38.

P=4.7×10-6).21Oestrogen receptors α and β encoded by ESR1 and ESR2, respectively, have been extensively studied due to the assumed role of oestrogens in the development of endometrial cancer. O’Mara et al reported a lead SNP (rs79575945) in the ESR1 region that was associated with endometrial cancer (p=1.86×10-5).24 However, this SNP did not reach genome-wide significance in a more recent larger GWAS.21 No statistically significant associations have been reported between endometrial cancer and SNPs in the ESR2 gene region.AKT is an oncogene linked to endometrial carcinogenesis. It is involved in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pro-proliferative signalling pathway to inactivate apoptosis and allow cell survival. The A allele of rs2494737 and G allele of rs2498796 were reported to be associated with increased and decreased risk of endometrial cancer in 2016, respectively.22 30 However, this association was not replicated in a larger GWAS in 2018.21 Nevertheless, given the previous strong indications, and biological basis that could explain endometrial carcinogenesis, we decided to include an AKT1 variant (rs2498794) in our results.PTEN is a multi-functional tumour suppressor gene that regulates the AKT/PKB signalling pathway and is commonly mutated in many cancers including endometrial cancer.32 Loss-of-function germline mutations in PTEN are responsible for Cowden syndrome, which exerts a lifetime risk of endometrial cancer of up to 28%.9 Lacey and colleagues studied SNPs in the PTEN gene region. However, none showed significant differences in frequency between 447 endometrial cancer cases and 439 controls of European ancestry.33KRAS mutations are known to be present in endometrial cancer.

These can be activated by high levels of KLF5 (transcriptional activator). Three SNPs have been identified in or around KLF5 that are associated with endometrial cancer. The G allele of rs11841589 (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.21. P=4.83×10-11), the A allele of rs9600103 (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.30. P=3.76×10-12) and C allele of rs7981863 (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.20.

P=2.70×10-17) have all been found to be associated with an increased likelihood of endometrial cancer in large European cohorts.21 30 34 It is worth noting that these SNPs are not independent, and hence they quite possibly tag the same causal variant.The MYC family of proto-oncogenes encode transcription factors that regulate cell proliferation, which can contribute to cancer development if dysregulated. The recent GWAS by O’Mara et al reported three SNPs within the MYC region that reached genome-wide significance with conditional p values reaching at least 5×10–8.35To test the utility of these SNPs as predictive markers, we devised a theoretical PRS calculation using the log ORs and EAFs per SNP from the published data. The results were very encouraging with an RR of 3.16 for the top 1% versus the mean, using all the top SNPs presented in table 1 and 2.09 when using only the SNPs that reached genome-wide significance (including AKT1).Controversy surrounding MDM2 variant SNP309MDM2 negatively regulates tumour suppressor gene TP53, and as such, has been extensively studied in relation to its potential role in predisposition to endometrial cancer. Our search identified six original studies of the association between MDM2 SNP rs2279744 (also referred to as SNP309) and endometrial cancer, all of which found a statistically significant increased risk per copy of the G allele. Two more original studies were identified through our full-text evaluation.

However, these were not included here as they did not meet our inclusion criteria—one due to small sample size, the other due to studying rs2279744 status dependent on another SNP.36 37 Even so, the two studies were described in multiple meta-analyses that are listed in table 3. Different permutations of these eight original studies appear in at least eight published meta-analyses. However, even the largest meta-analysis contained <2000 cases (table 3)38View this table:Table 3 Characteristics of studies that examined MDM2 SNP rs2279744In comparison, a GWAS including nearly 13 000 cases found no evidence of an association with OR and corresponding 95% CI of 1.00 (0.97 to 1.03) and a p value of 0.93 (personal communication).21 Nevertheless, we cannot completely rule out a role for MDM2 variants in endometrial cancer predisposition as the candidate-gene studies reported larger effects in Asians, whereas the GWAS primarily contained participants of European ancestry. There is also some suggestion that the SNP309 variant is in linkage disequilibrium with another variant, SNP285, which confers an opposite effect.It is worth noting that the SNP285C/SNP309G haplotype frequency was observed in up to 8% of Europeans, thus requiring correction for the confounding effect of SNP285C in European studies.39 However, aside from one study conducted by Knappskog et al, no other study including the meta-analyses corrected for the confounding effect of SNP285.40 Among the studies presented in table 3, Knappskog et al (2012) reported that after correcting for SNP285, the OR for association of this haplotype with endometrial cancer was much lower, though still significant. Unfortunately, the meta-analyses which synthesised Knappskog et al (2012), as part of their analysis, did not correct for SNP285C in the European-based studies they included.38 41 42 It is also concerning that two meta-analyses using the same primary articles failed to report the same result, in two instances.38 42–44DiscussionThis article represents the most comprehensive systematic review to date, regarding critical appraisal of the available evidence of common low-penetrance variants implicated in predisposition to endometrial cancer.

We have identified the most robust SNPs in the context of endometrial cancer risk. Of those, only 19 were significant at genome-wide level and a further five were considered marginally significant. The largest GWAS conducted in this field was the discovery- and meta-GWAS by O’Mara et al, which utilised 12 096 cases and 108 979 controls.21 Despite the inclusion of all published GWAS and around 5000 newly genotyped cases, the total number did not reach anywhere near what is currently available for other common cancers such as breast cancer. For instance, BCAC (Breast Cancer Association Consortium) stands at well over 200 000 individuals with more than half being cases, and resulted in identification of ~170 SNPs in relation to breast cancer.19 45 A total of 313 SNPs including imputations were then used to derive a PRS for breast cancer.19 Therefore, further efforts should be directed to recruit more patients, with deep phenotypic clinical data to allow for relevant adjustments and subgroup analyses to be conducted for better precision.A recent pre-print study by Zhang and colleagues examined the polygenicity and potential for SNP-based risk prediction for 14 common cancers, including endometrial cancer, using available summary-level data from European-ancestry datasets.46 They estimated that there are just over 1000 independent endometrial cancer susceptibility SNPs, and that a PRS comprising all such SNPs would have an area under the receiver-operator curve of 0.64, similar to that predicted for ovarian cancer, but lower than that for the other cancers in the study. The modelling in the paper suggests that an endometrial cancer GWAS double the size of the current largest study would be able to identify susceptibility SNPs together explaining 40% of the genetic variance, but that in order to explain 75% of the genetic variance it would be necessary to have a GWAS comprising close to 150 000 cases and controls, far in excess of what is currently feasible.We found that the literature consists mainly of candidate-gene studies with small sample sizes, meta-analyses reporting conflicting results despite using the same set of primary articles, and multiple reports of significant SNPs that have not been validated by any larger GWAS.

The candidate-gene studies were indeed the most useful and cheaper technique available until the mid to late 2000s. However, a lack of reproducibility (particularly due to population stratification and reporting bias), uncertainty of reported associations, and considerably high false discovery rates make these studies much less appropriate in the post-GWAS era. Unlike the candidate-gene approach, GWAS do not require prior knowledge, selection of genes or SNPs, and provide vast amounts of data. Furthermore, both the genotyping process and data analysis phases have become cheaper, the latter particularly due to faster and open-access pre-phasing and imputation tools being made available.It is clear from table 1 that some SNPs were reported with wide 95% CI, which can be directly attributed to small sample sizes particularly when restricting the cases to non-endometrioid histology only, low EAF or poor imputation quality. Thus, these should be interpreted with caution.

Additionally, most of the SNPs reported by candidate-gene studies were not detected by the largest GWAS to date conducted by O’Mara et al.21 However, this does not necessarily mean that the possibility of those SNPs being relevant should be completely dismissed. Moreover, meta-analyses were attempted for other variants. However, these showed no statistically significant association and many presented with high heterogeneity between the respective studies (data not shown). Furthermore, as many studies utilised the same set of cases and/or controls, conducting a meta-analysis was not possible for a good number of SNPs. It is therefore unequivocal that the literature is crowded with numerous small candidate-gene studies and conflicting data.

This makes it particularly hard to detect novel SNPs and conduct meaningful meta-analyses.We found convincing evidence for 19 variants that indicated the strongest association with endometrial cancer, as shown in table 1. The associations between endometrial cancer and variants in or around HNF1B, CYP19A1, SOX4, MYC, KLF and EIF2AK found in earlier GWAS were then replicated in the latest and largest GWAS. These SNPs showed promising potential in a theoretical PRS we devised based on published data. Using all 24 or genome-wide significant SNPs only, women with a PRS in the top 1% of the distribution would be predicted to have a risk of endometrial cancer 3.16 and 2.09 times higher than the mean risk, respectively.However, the importance of these variants and relevance of the proximate genes in a functional or biological context is challenging to evaluate. Long distance promoter regulation by enhancers may disguise the genuine target gene.

In addition, enhancers often do not loop to the nearest gene, further complicating the relevance of nearby gene(s) to a GWAS hit. In order to elucidate biologically relevant candidate target genes in endometrial cancer, O’Mara et al looked into promoter-associated chromatin looping using a modern HiChIP approach.47 The authors utilised normal and tumoural endometrial cell lines for this analysis which showed significant enrichment for endometrial cancer heritability, with 103 candidate target genes identified across the 13 risk loci identified by the largest ECAC GWAS. Notable genes identified here were CDKN2A and WT1, and their antisense counterparts. The former was reported to be nearby of rs1679014 and the latter of rs10835920, as shown in table 1. Moreover, of the 36 candidate target genes, 17 were found to be downregulated while 19 were upregulated in endometrial tumours.The authors also investigated overlap between the 13 endometrial cancer risk loci and top eQTL variants for each target gene.47 In whole blood, of the two particular lead SNPs, rs8822380 at 17q21.32 was a top eQTL for SNX11 and HOXB2, whereas rs937213 at 15q15.1 was a top eQTL for SRP14.

In endometrial tumour, rs7579014 at 2p16.1 was found to be a top eQTL for BCL11A. This is particularly interesting because BCL11A was the only nearby/candidate gene that had a GWAS association reported in both endometrioid and non-endometrioid subtypes. The study looked at protein–protein interactions between endometrial cancer drivers and candidate target gene products. Significant interactions were observed with TP53 (most significant), AKT, PTEN, ESR1 and KRAS, among others. Finally, when 103 target candidate genes and 387 proteins were combined together, 462 pathways were found to be significantly enriched.

Many of these are related to gene regulation, cancer, obesity, insulinaemia and oestrogen exposure. This study clearly showed a potential biological relevance for some of the SNPs reported by ECAC GWAS in 2018.Most of the larger included studies used cohorts primarily composed of women of broad European descent. Hence, there are negligible data available for other ethnicities, particularly African women. This is compounded by the lack of reference genotype data available for comparative analysis, making it harder for research to be conducted in ethnicities other than Europeans. This poses a problem for developing risk prediction models that are equally valuable and predictive across populations.

Thus, our results also are of limited applicability to non-European populations.Furthermore, considering that non-endometrioid cases comprise a small proportion (~20%) of all endometrial cancer cases, much larger cohort sizes are needed to detect any genuine signals for non-endometrioid tumours. Most of the evaluated studies looked at either overall/mixed endometrial cancer subtypes or endometrioid histology, and those that looked at variant associations with non-endometrioid histology were unlikely to have enough power to detect any signal with statistical significance. This is particularly concerning because non-endometrioid subtypes are biologically aggressive tumours with a much poorer prognosis that contribute disproportionately to mortality from endometrial cancer. It is particularly important that attempts to improve early detection and prevention of endometrial cancer focus primarily on improving outcomes from these subtypes. It is also worth noting that, despite the current shift towards a molecular classification of endometrial cancer, most studies used the overarching classical Bokhman’s classification system, type I versus type II, or no histological classification system at all.

Therefore, it is important to create and follow a standardised and comprehensive classification system for reporting tumour subtypes for future studies.This study compiled and presented available information for an extensively studied, yet unproven in large datasets, SNP309 variant in MDM2. Currently, there is no convincing evidence for an association between this variant and endometrial cancer risk. Additionally, of all the studies, only one accounted for the opposing effect of a nearby variant SNP285 in their analyses. Thus, we conclude that until confirmed by a sufficiently large GWAS, this variant should not be considered significant in influencing the risk of endometrial cancer and therefore not included in a PRS. This is also true for the majority of the SNPs reported in candidate-gene studies, as the numbers fall far short of being able to detect genuine signals.This systematic review presents the most up-to-date evidence for endometrial cancer susceptibility variants, emphasising the need for further large-scale studies to identify more variants of importance, and validation of these associations.

Until data from larger and more diverse cohorts are available, the top 24 SNPs presented here are the most robust common genetic variants that affect endometrial cancer risk. The multiplicative effects of these SNPs could be used in a PRS to allow personalised risk prediction models to be developed for targeted screening and prevention interventions for women at greatest risk of endometrial cancer..

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This notice viagra doesnt work announces an extension of the timeline for publication of a Medicare final rule in accordance with the Social Security Act, which allows us to extend the timeline for publication of the final rule. As of August 26, 2020, the timeline for publication of the final rule to finalize the provisions of the October 17, 2019 proposed rule (84 FR 55766) is extended until August 31, 2021. Start Further Info Lisa O. Wilson, (410) viagra doesnt work 786-8852. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information In the October 17, 2019 Federal Register (84 FR 55766), we published a proposed rule that addressed undue regulatory impact and burden of the physician self-referral law.

The proposed rule was issued in conjunction with the Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services' (CMS) Patients over Paperwork initiative and the Department of Health and Human viagra doesnt work Services' (the Department or HHS) Regulatory Sprint to Coordinated Care. In the proposed rule, we proposed exceptions to the physician self-referral law for certain value-based compensation arrangements between or among physicians, providers, and suppliers. A new exception for certain arrangements under which a physician receives limited remuneration for items or services actually provided by the physician. A new exception viagra doesnt work for donations of cybersecurity technology and related services.

And amendments to the existing exception for electronic health records (EHR) items and services. The proposed rule also provides critically necessary guidance for physicians and health care providers and suppliers whose financial relationships are governed by the physician self-referral statute and regulations. This notice announces an viagra doesnt work extension of the timeline for publication of the final rule and the continuation of effectiveness of the proposed rule. Section 1871(a)(3)(A) of the Social Security Act (the Act) requires us to establish and publish a regular timeline for the publication of final regulations based on the previous publication of a proposed regulation. In accordance with section 1871(a)(3)(B) of the Act, the timeline may vary among different regulations based on differences in the complexity of the regulation, the number and scope of comments received, and other relevant factors, but may not be longer than 3 years except under exceptional circumstances.

In addition, in accordance with section 1871(a)(3)(B) of the Act, viagra doesnt work the Secretary may extend the initial targeted publication date of the final regulation if the Secretary, no later than the regulation's previously established proposed publication date, publishes a notice with the new target date, and such notice includes a brief explanation of the justification for the variation. We announced in the Spring 2020 Unified Agenda (June 30, 2020, www.reginfo.gov) that we would issue the final rule in August 2020. However, we are still working through the Start Printed Page 52941complexity of the issues raised by comments received on the proposed rule and therefore we are not able to meet the announced publication target date. This notice extends the timeline for viagra doesnt work publication of the final rule until August 31, 2021. Start Signature Dated.

August 24, 2020. Wilma M viagra doesnt work. Robinson, Deputy Executive Secretary to the Department, Department of Health and Human Services. End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2020-18867 Filed viagra doesnt work 8-26-20.

8:45 am]BILLING CODE 4120-01-PThe Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services (CMS) today announced efforts underway to support Louisiana and Texas in response to Hurricane Laura. On August 26, 2020, Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Alex Azar declared public health viagra doesnt work emergencies (PHEs) in these states, retroactive to August 22, 2020 for the state of Louisiana and to August 23, 2020 for the state of Texas. CMS is working to ensure hospitals and other facilities can continue operations and provide access to care despite the effects of Hurricane Laura. CMS provided numerous waivers to health care providers during the current erectile dysfunction disease 2019 (erectile dysfunction treatment) viagra to meet the needs of beneficiaries and providers.

The waivers already in place will be available to health care providers to use during the duration of the erectile dysfunction treatment PHE determination timeframe and for viagra doesnt work the Hurricane Laura PHE. CMS may waive certain additional Medicare, Medicaid, and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) requirements, create special enrollment opportunities for individuals to access healthcare quickly, and take steps to ensure dialysis patients obtain critical life-saving services. “Our thoughts are with everyone who is in the path of this powerful and dangerous hurricane and CMS is doing everything within its authority to provide assistance and relief to all who are affected,” said CMS Administrator Seema Verma. €œWe will partner and coordinate with state, federal, and local officials to make sure that in the midst of all of the uncertainty a natural disaster can bring, our beneficiaries will not have to worry about access to healthcare and other crucial life-saving and sustaining services they may need.” viagra doesnt work Below are key administrative actions CMS will be taking in response to the PHEs declared in Louisiana and Texas. Waivers and Flexibilities for Hospitals and Other Healthcare Facilities.

CMS has already waived many Medicare, Medicaid, and CHIP requirements for facilities. The CMS Dallas Survey viagra doesnt work &. Enforcement Division, under the Survey Operations Group, will grant other provider-specific requests for specific types of hospitals and other facilities in Louisiana and Texas. These waivers, once issued, will help provide continued access to care for beneficiaries. For more information on viagra doesnt work the waivers CMS has granted, visit.

Www.cms.gov/emergency. Special Enrollment Opportunities for Hurricane Victims. CMS will make available special enrollment periods for certain Medicare beneficiaries and certain individuals seeking health plans offered through the Federal Health Insurance Exchange. This gives people impacted by the hurricane the opportunity to change their Medicare health and prescription drug plans and gain access to health coverage on the Exchange if eligible for the special enrollment period viagra doesnt work. For more information, please visit.

Disaster Preparedness Toolkit for State Medicaid Agencies. CMS developed an inventory of Medicaid and CHIP viagra doesnt work flexibilities and authorities available to states in the event of a disaster. For more information and to access the toolkit, visit. Https://www.medicaid.gov/state-resource-center/disaster-response-toolkit/index.html. Dialysis Care viagra doesnt work.

CMS is helping patients obtain access to critical life-saving services. The Kidney Community Emergency Response (KCER) program has been activated and is working with the End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network, Network 13 – Louisiana, and Network 14 - Texas, to assess the status of dialysis facilities in the potentially impacted areas related to generators, alternate water supplies, education and materials for patients and more. The KCER is also assisting patients who evacuated ahead of the storm to receive viagra doesnt work dialysis services in the location to which they evacuated. Patients have been educated to have an emergency supply kit on hand including important personal, medical and insurance information. Contact information for their facility, the ESRD Network hotline number, and contact information of those with whom they may stay or for out-of-state contacts in a waterproof bag.

They have also been instructed to have supplies on hand to follow a viagra doesnt work three-day emergency diet. The ESRD Network 8 – Mississippi hotline is 1-800-638-8299, Network 13 – Louisiana hotline is 800-472-7139, the ESRD Network 14 - Texas hotline is 877-886-4435, and the KCER hotline is 866-901-3773. Additional information is available on the KCER website www.kcercoalition.com. During the 2017 and 2018 hurricane seasons, CMS approved viagra doesnt work special purpose renal dialysis facilities in several states to furnish dialysis on a short-term basis at designated locations to serve ESRD patients under emergency circumstances in which there were limited dialysis resources or access-to-care problems due to the emergency circumstances. Medical equipment and supplies replacements.

Under the COVD-19 waivers, CMS suspended certain requirements necessary for Medicare beneficiaries who have lost or realized damage to their durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics and supplies as a result of the PHE. This will help to make viagra doesnt work sure that beneficiaries can continue to access the needed medical equipment and supplies they rely on each day. Medicare beneficiaries can contact 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) for assistance. Ensuring Access to Care in Medicare Advantage and Part D. During a public health emergency, Medicare Advantage Organizations and Part D Plan sponsors must take steps to viagra doesnt work maintain access to covered benefits for beneficiaries in affected areas.

These steps include allowing Part A/B and supplemental Part C plan benefits to be furnished at specified non-contracted facilities and waiving, in full, requirements for gatekeeper referrals where applicable. Emergency Preparedness Requirements. Providers and suppliers are expected to have emergency preparedness programs based on an viagra doesnt work all-hazards approach. To assist in the understanding of the emergency preparedness requirements, CMS Central Office and the Regional Offices hosted two webinars in 2018 regarding Emergency Preparedness requirements and provider expectations. One was an all provider training on June 19, 2018 with more than 3,000 provider participants and the other an all-surveyor training on August 8, 2018.

Both presentations covered viagra doesnt work the emergency preparedness final rule which included emergency power supply. 1135 waiver process. Best practices and lessons learned from past disasters. And helpful resources and more viagra doesnt work. Both webinars are available at https://qsep.cms.gov/welcome.aspx.

CMS also compiled a list of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) and useful national emergency preparedness resources to assist state Survey Agencies (SAs), their state, tribal, regional, local emergency management partners and health care providers to develop effective and robust emergency plans and tool kits to assure compliance with the emergency preparedness rules. The tools can be located viagra doesnt work at. CMS Regional Offices have provided specific emergency preparedness information to Medicare providers and suppliers through meetings, dialogue and presentations. The regional offices also provide regular technical assistance in emergency preparedness to state agencies and staff, who, since November 2017, have been regularly surveying providers and suppliers for compliance with emergency preparedness regulations. Additional information on the emergency viagra doesnt work preparedness requirements can be found here.

Https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Guidance/Manuals/downloads/som107ap_z_emergprep.pdf CMS will continue to work with all geographic areas impacted by Hurricane Laura. We encourage beneficiaries and providers of healthcare services that have been impacted to seek help by visiting CMS’ emergency webpage (www.cms.gov/emergency). For more information about the HHS PHE, please visit.

As of August 26, 2020, the timeline for publication of the final rule to how to buy cheap viagra finalize the provisions of the October 17, 2019 proposed rule (84 FR 55766) is extended until August 31, 2021. Start Further Info Lisa O. Wilson, (410) 786-8852. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information how to buy cheap viagra In the October 17, 2019 Federal Register (84 FR 55766), we published a proposed rule that addressed undue regulatory impact and burden of the physician self-referral law. The proposed rule was issued in conjunction with the Centers for Medicare &.

Medicaid Services' (CMS) Patients over Paperwork initiative and the Department of Health and Human Services' (the Department or HHS) Regulatory Sprint to Coordinated Care. In the proposed rule, we proposed exceptions to how to buy cheap viagra the physician self-referral law for certain value-based compensation arrangements between or among physicians, providers, and suppliers. A new exception for certain arrangements under which a physician receives limited remuneration for items or services actually provided by the physician. A new exception for donations of cybersecurity technology and related services. And amendments how to buy cheap viagra to the existing exception for electronic health records (EHR) items and services.

The proposed rule also provides critically necessary guidance for physicians and health care providers and suppliers whose financial relationships are governed by the physician self-referral statute and regulations. This notice announces an extension of the timeline for publication of the final rule and the continuation of effectiveness of the proposed rule. Section 1871(a)(3)(A) of the Social Security Act (the Act) requires us to establish and publish a regular timeline for the publication of final regulations based on the previous publication of a proposed how to buy cheap viagra regulation. In accordance with section 1871(a)(3)(B) of the Act, the timeline may vary among different regulations based on differences in the complexity of the regulation, the number and scope of comments received, and other relevant factors, but may not be longer than 3 years except under exceptional circumstances. In addition, in accordance with section 1871(a)(3)(B) of the Act, the Secretary may extend the initial targeted publication date of the final regulation if the Secretary, no later than the regulation's previously established proposed publication date, publishes a notice with the new target date, and such notice includes a brief explanation of the justification for the variation.

We announced in the Spring 2020 Unified Agenda (June 30, 2020, www.reginfo.gov) that how to buy cheap viagra we would issue the final rule in August 2020. However, we are still working through the Start Printed Page 52941complexity of the issues raised by comments received on the proposed rule and therefore we are not able to meet the announced publication target date. This notice extends the timeline for publication of the final rule until August 31, 2021. Start Signature how to buy cheap viagra Dated. August 24, 2020.

Wilma M. Robinson, Deputy how to buy cheap viagra Executive Secretary to the Department, Department of Health and Human Services. End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2020-18867 Filed 8-26-20. 8:45 am]BILLING how to buy cheap viagra CODE 4120-01-PThe Centers for Medicare &.

Medicaid Services (CMS) today announced efforts underway to support Louisiana and Texas in response to Hurricane Laura. On August 26, 2020, Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Alex Azar declared public health emergencies (PHEs) in these states, retroactive to August 22, 2020 for the state of Louisiana and to August 23, 2020 for the state of Texas. CMS is working to ensure how to buy cheap viagra hospitals and other facilities can continue operations and provide access to care despite the effects of Hurricane Laura. CMS provided numerous waivers to health care providers during the current erectile dysfunction disease 2019 (erectile dysfunction treatment) viagra to meet the needs of beneficiaries and providers. The waivers already in place will be available to health care providers to use during the duration of the erectile dysfunction treatment PHE determination timeframe and for the Hurricane Laura PHE.

CMS may waive certain additional Medicare, Medicaid, and Children’s Health Insurance Program how to buy cheap viagra (CHIP) requirements, create special enrollment opportunities for individuals to access healthcare quickly, and take steps to ensure dialysis patients obtain critical life-saving services. “Our thoughts are with everyone who is in the path of this powerful and dangerous hurricane and CMS is doing everything within its authority to provide assistance and relief to all who are affected,” said CMS Administrator Seema Verma. €œWe will partner and coordinate with state, federal, and local officials to make sure that in the midst of all of the uncertainty a natural disaster can bring, our beneficiaries will not have to worry about access to healthcare and other crucial life-saving and sustaining services they may need.” Below are key administrative actions CMS will be taking in response to the PHEs declared in Louisiana and Texas. Waivers and Flexibilities for how to buy cheap viagra Hospitals and Other Healthcare Facilities. CMS has already waived many Medicare, Medicaid, and CHIP requirements for facilities.

The CMS Dallas Survey &. Enforcement Division, under how to buy cheap viagra the Survey Operations Group, will grant other provider-specific requests for specific types of hospitals and other facilities in Louisiana and Texas. These waivers, once issued, will help provide continued access to care for beneficiaries. For more information on the waivers CMS has granted, visit. Www.cms.gov/emergency.

Special Enrollment Opportunities for Hurricane Victims. CMS will make available special enrollment periods for certain Medicare beneficiaries and certain individuals seeking health plans offered through the Federal Health Insurance Exchange. This gives people impacted by the hurricane the opportunity to change their Medicare health and prescription drug plans and gain access to health coverage on the Exchange if eligible for the special enrollment period. For more information, please visit. Disaster Preparedness Toolkit for State Medicaid Agencies.

CMS developed an inventory of Medicaid and CHIP flexibilities and authorities available to states in the event of a disaster. For more information and to access the toolkit, visit. Https://www.medicaid.gov/state-resource-center/disaster-response-toolkit/index.html. Dialysis Care. CMS is helping patients obtain access to critical life-saving services.

The Kidney Community Emergency Response (KCER) program has been activated and is working with the End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network, Network 13 – Louisiana, and Network 14 - Texas, to assess the status of dialysis facilities in the potentially impacted areas related to generators, alternate water supplies, education and materials for patients and more. The KCER is also assisting patients who evacuated ahead of the storm to receive dialysis services in the location to which they evacuated. Patients have been educated to have an emergency supply kit on hand including important personal, medical and insurance information. Contact information for their facility, the ESRD Network hotline number, and contact information of those with whom they may stay or for out-of-state contacts in a waterproof bag. They have also been instructed to have supplies on hand to follow a three-day emergency diet.

The ESRD Network 8 – Mississippi hotline is 1-800-638-8299, Network 13 – Louisiana hotline is 800-472-7139, the ESRD Network 14 - Texas hotline is 877-886-4435, and the KCER hotline is 866-901-3773. Additional information is available on the KCER website www.kcercoalition.com. During the 2017 and 2018 hurricane seasons, CMS approved special purpose renal dialysis facilities in several states to furnish dialysis on a short-term basis at designated locations to serve ESRD patients under emergency circumstances in which there were limited dialysis resources or access-to-care problems due to the emergency circumstances. Medical equipment and supplies replacements. Under the COVD-19 waivers, CMS suspended certain requirements necessary for Medicare beneficiaries who have lost or realized damage to their durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics and supplies as a result of the PHE.

This will help to make sure that beneficiaries can continue to access the needed medical equipment and supplies they rely on each day. Medicare beneficiaries can contact 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) for assistance. Ensuring Access to Care in Medicare Advantage and Part D. During a public health emergency, Medicare Advantage Organizations and Part D Plan sponsors must take steps to maintain access to covered benefits for beneficiaries in affected areas. These steps include allowing Part A/B and supplemental Part C plan benefits to be furnished at specified non-contracted facilities and waiving, in full, requirements for gatekeeper referrals where applicable.

Emergency Preparedness Requirements. Providers and suppliers are expected to have emergency preparedness programs based on an all-hazards approach. To assist in the understanding of the emergency preparedness requirements, CMS Central Office and the Regional Offices hosted two webinars in 2018 regarding Emergency Preparedness requirements and provider expectations. One was an all provider training on June 19, 2018 with more than 3,000 provider participants and the other an all-surveyor training on August 8, 2018. Both presentations covered the emergency preparedness final rule which included emergency power supply.

1135 waiver process. Best practices and lessons learned from past disasters. And helpful resources and more. Both webinars are available at https://qsep.cms.gov/welcome.aspx. CMS also compiled a list of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) and useful national emergency preparedness resources to assist state Survey Agencies (SAs), their state, tribal, regional, local emergency management partners and health care providers to develop effective and robust emergency plans and tool kits to assure compliance with the emergency preparedness rules.

The tools can be located at. CMS Regional Offices have provided specific emergency preparedness information to Medicare providers and suppliers through meetings, dialogue and presentations. The regional offices also provide regular technical assistance in emergency preparedness to state agencies and staff, who, since November 2017, have been regularly surveying providers and suppliers for compliance with emergency preparedness regulations. Additional information on the emergency preparedness requirements can be found here. Https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Guidance/Manuals/downloads/som107ap_z_emergprep.pdf CMS will continue to work with all geographic areas impacted by Hurricane Laura.

We encourage beneficiaries and providers of healthcare services that have been impacted to seek help by visiting CMS’ emergency webpage (www.cms.gov/emergency). For more information about the HHS PHE, please visit. Https://www.hhs.gov/about/news/2020/08/26/hhs-secretary-azar-declares-public-health-emergencies-in-louisiana-and-texas-due-to-hurricane-laura.html.

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Aug. 29, 2020 -- Chadwick Boseman, the star of the 2018 Marvel Studios megahit Black Panther, died of colon cancer Friday. He was 43.

Boseman, who was diagnosed 4 years ago, had kept his condition a secret. He filmed his recent movies ''during and between countless surgeries and chemotherapy," according to a statement issued on his Twitter account. When the actor was diagnosed in 2016, the cancer was at stage III -- meaning it had already grown through the colon wall -- but then progressed to the more lethal stage IV, meaning it had spread beyond his colon.

Messages of condolences and the hashtag #Wakandaforever, referring to the fictional African nation in the Black Panther film, flooded social media Friday evening. Oprah tweeted. "What a gentle gifted SOUL.

Showing us all that Greatness in between surgeries and chemo. The courage, the strength, the Power it takes to do that. This is what Dignity looks like.

" Marvel Studios tweeted. "Your legacy will live on forever." Boseman was also known for his role as Jackie Robinson in the movie 42. Coincidentally, Friday was Major League Baseball's Jackie Robinson Day, where every player on every team wears Robinson's number 42 on their jerseys.

Boseman's other starring roles include portraying James Brown in Get on Up and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall in Marshall. But his role as King T'Challa in Black Panther, the super hero protagonist, made him an icon and an inspiration.

About Colon Cancer Boseman's death reflects a troubling recent trend, says Mark Hanna, MD, a colorectal surgeon at City of Hope, a comprehensive cancer center near Los Angeles. "We have noticed an increasing incidence of colorectal cancer in young adults," says Hanna, who did not treat Boseman. "I've seen patients as young as their early 20s." About 104,000 cases of colon cancer will be diagnosed this year, according to American Cancer Society estimates, and another 43,000 cases of rectal cancer will be diagnosed.

About 12% of those, or 18,000 cases, will be in people under age 50. As the rates have declined in older adults due to screening, rates in young adults have steadily risen. Younger patients are often diagnosed at a later stage than older adults, Hanna says, because patients and even their doctors don't think about the possibility of colon cancer.

Because it is considered a cancer affecting older adults, many younger people may brush off the symptoms or delay getting medical attention, Hanna says. In a survey of 885 colorectal cancer patients conducted by Colorectal Cancer Alliance earlier this year, 75% said they visited two or more doctors before getting their diagnosis, and 11% went to 10 or more before finding out. If found early, colon cancer is curable, Hanna says.

About 50% of those with colon cancer will be diagnosed at stage I or II, which is considered localized disease, he says. "The majority have a very good prognosis." The 5-year survival rate is about 90% for both stage I and II. But when it progresses to stage III, the cancer has begun to grow into surrounding tissues and the lymph nodes, Hanna says, and the survival rate for 5 years drops to 75%.

About 25% of patients are diagnosed at stage III, he says. If the diagnosis is made at stage IV, the 5-year survival rate drops to about 10% or 15%, he says. Experts have been trying to figure out why more young adults are getting colon cancer and why some do so poorly.

"Traditionally we thought that patients who are older would have a worse outlook," Hanna says, partly because they tend to have other medical conditions too. Some experts say that younger patients might have more ''genetically aggressive disease," Hanna says. "Our understanding of colorectal cancer is becoming more nuanced, and we know that not all forms are the same." For instance, he says, testing is done for specific genetic mutations that have been tied to colon cancer.

"It's not just about finding the mutations, but finding the drug that targets [that form] best." Paying Attention to Red Flags "If you have any of what we call the red flag signs, do not ignore your symptoms no matter what your age is," Hanna says. Those are. In 2018, the American Cancer Society changed its guidelines for screening, recommending those at average risk start at age 45, not 50.

The screening can be stool-based testing, such as a fecal occult blood test, or visual, such as a colonoscopy. Hanna says he orders a colonoscopy if the symptoms suggest colon cancer, regardless of a patient's age. Family history of colorectal cancer is a risk factor, as are being obese or overweight, being sedentary, and eating lots of red meat.

Sources Mark Hanna, MD, colorectal surgeon and assistant clinical professor of surgery, City of Hope, Los Angeles. American Cancer Society. "Key Statistics for Colorectal Cancer." Twitter statement.

Chadwick Boseman. American Cancer Society. "Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors." American Cancer Society.

'"Colorectal Cancer Rates Rise in Younger Adults." American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting, May 29-31, 2020. American Cancer Society "Survival Rates for Colorectal Cancer." American Cancer Society. "Colorectal Cancer Facts &.

Figures. 2017-2019." © 2020 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.FRIDAY, Aug.

28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- As many as 20% of Americans don't believe in treatments, a new study finds. Misinformed treatment beliefs drive opposition to public treatment policies even more than politics, education, religion or other factors, researchers say. The findings are based on a survey of nearly 2,000 U.S.

Adults done in 2019, during the largest measles outbreak in 25 years. The researchers, from the Annenberg Public Policy Center (APPC) of the University of Pennsylvania, found that negative misperceptions about vaccinations. reduced the likelihood of supporting mandatory childhood treatments by 70%, reduced the likelihood of opposing religious exemptions by 66%, reduced the likelihood of opposing personal belief exemptions by 79%.

"There are real implications here for a treatment for erectile dysfunction treatment," lead author Dominik Stecula said in an APPC news release. He conducted the research while at APPC and is now an assistant professor of political science at Colorado State University. "The negative treatment beliefs we examined aren't limited only to the measles, mumps and rubella [MMR] treatment, but are general attitudes about vaccination." Stecula called for an education campaign by public health professionals and journalists, among others, to preemptively correct misinformation and prepare the public to accept a erectile dysfunction treatment.

Overall, there was strong support for vaccination policies. 72% strongly or somewhat supported mandatory childhood vaccination, 60% strongly or somewhat opposed religious exemptions, 66% strongly or somewhat opposed treatment exemptions based on personal beliefs. "On the one hand, these are big majorities.

Well above 50% of Americans support mandatory childhood vaccinations and oppose religious and personal belief exemptions to vaccination," said co-author Ozan Kuru, a former APPC researcher, now an assistant professor of communications at the National University of Singapore. "Still, we need a stronger consensus in the public to bolster pro-treatment attitudes and legislation and thus achieve community immunity," he added in the release. A previous study from the 2018-2019 measles outbreak found that people who rely on social media were more likely to be misinformed about treatments.

And a more recent one found that people who got information from social media or conservative news outlets at the start of the erectile dysfunction treatment viagra were more likely to be misinformed about how to prevent and hold conspiracy theories about it. With the erectile dysfunction viagra still raging, the number of Americans needed to be vaccinated to achieve community-wide immunity is not known, the researchers said. The findings were recently published online in the American Journal of Public Health.By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Aug.

28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding mothers are unlikely to transmit the new erectile dysfunction to their babies via their milk, researchers say. No cases of an infant contracting erectile dysfunction treatment from breast milk have been documented, but questions about the potential risk remain. Researchers examined 64 samples of breast milk collected from 18 women across the United States who were infected with the new erectile dysfunction (erectile dysfunction) that causes erectile dysfunction treatment.

One sample tested positive for erectile dysfunction RNA, but follow-up tests showed that the viagra couldn't replicate and therefore, couldn't infect the breastfed infant, according to the study recently published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association. "Detection of viral RNA does not equate to . It has to grow and multiply in order to be infectious and we did not find that in any of our samples," said study author Christina Chambers, a professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Diego.

She is also director of the Mommy's Milk Human Milk Research Biorepository. "Our findings suggest breast milk itself is not likely a source of for the infant," Chambers said in a UCSD news release. To prevent transmission of the viagra while breastfeeding, wearing a mask, hand-washing and sterilizing pumping equipment after each use are recommended.

"We hope our results and future studies will give women the reassurance needed for them to breastfeed. Human milk provides invaluable benefits to mom and baby," said co-author Dr. Grace Aldrovandi, chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital in Los Angeles.

WebMD News from HealthDay Sources SOURCE. University of California, San Diego, news release, Aug. 19, 2020 Copyright © 2013-2020 HealthDay.

All rights reserved.Nursing home staff will have to be tested regularly for erectile dysfunction treatment, and facilities that fail to do so will face fines, the Trump administration said Tuesday. Even though they account for less than 1% of the nation's population, long-term care facilities account for 42% of erectile dysfunction treatment deaths in the United States, the Associated Press reported. There have been more than 70,000 deaths in U.S.

Nursing homes, according to the erectile dysfunction treatment Tracking Project. It's been months since the White House first urged governors to test all nursing home residents and staff, the AP reported. WebMD News from HealthDay Copyright © 2013-2020 HealthDay.

All rights reserved.August 28, 2020 -- Alcohol-based hand sanitizers that are packaged in containers that look like food items or drinks could cause injury or death if ingested, according to a new warning the FDA issued Thursday. Hand sanitizers are being packaged in beer cans, water bottles, juice bottles, vodka bottles and children’s food pouches, the FDA said. Some sanitizers also contain flavors, such as chocolate or raspberry, which could cause confusion.

€œI am increasingly concerned about hand sanitizer being packaged to appear to be consumable products, such as baby food or beverages,” Stephen Hahn, MD, the FDA commissioner, said in a statement. Accidentally drinking hand sanitizer — even a small amount — is potentially lethal to children. €œThese products could confuse consumers into accidentally ingesting a potentially deadly product,” he said.

€œIt’s dangerous to add scents with food flavors to hand sanitizers which children could think smells like food, eat and get alcohol poisoning.” For example, the FDA received a report about a consumer who purchased a bottle that looked like drinkable water but was actually hand sanitizer. In another report, a retailer informed the agency about a hand sanitizer product that was marketed in a pouch that looks like a children’s snack and had cartoons on it. Meanwhile, the FDA's warning list about dangerous hand sanitizers containing methanol continues to grow as some people are drinking the sanitizers to get an alcohol high.

Others have believed a rumor, circulated online, that drinking the highly potent and toxic alcohol can disinfect the body, protecting them from erectile dysfunction treatment . Earlier this month, the FDA also issued a warning about hand sanitizers contaminated with 1-propanol. Ingesting 1-propanol can cause central nervous system depression, which can be fatal, the agency says.

Symptoms of 1-propanol exposure can include confusion, decreased consciousness, and slowed pulse and breathing. One brand of sanitizer, Harmonic Nature S de RL de MI of Mexico, are labeled to contain ethanol or isopropyl alcohol but have tested positive for 1-propanol contamination. Poison control centers and state health departments have reported an increasing number of adverse events associated with hand sanitizer ingestion, including heart issues, nervous system problems, hospitalizations and deaths, according to the statement.

The FDA encouraged consumers and health care professionals to report issues to the MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program. The agency is working with manufacturers to recall confusing and dangerous products and is encouraging retailers to remove some products from shelves. The FDA is also updating its list of hand sanitizer products that consumers should avoid.

€œManufacturers should be vigilant about packaging and marketing their hand sanitizers in food or drink packages in an effort to mitigate any potential inadvertent use by consumers,” Hahn said.More than 90% of babies born with heart defects survive into adulthood. As a result, there are now more adults living with congenital heart disease than children. These adults have a chronic, lifelong condition and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) has produced advice to give the best chance of a normal life.

The guidelines are published online today in European Heart Journal,1 and on the ESC website.2Congenital heart disease refers to any structural defect of the heart and/or great vessels (those directly connected to the heart) present at birth. Congenital heart disease affects all aspects of life, including physical and mental health, socialising, and work. Most patients are unable to exercise at the same level as their peers which, along with the awareness of having a chronic condition, affects mental wellbeing."Having a congenital heart disease, with a need for long-term follow-up and treatment, can also have an impact on social life, limit employment options and make it difficult to get insurance," said Professor Helmut Baumgartner, Chairperson of the guidelines Task Force and head of Adult Congenital and Valvular Heart Disease at the University Hospital of Münster, Germany.

"Guiding and supporting patients in all of these processes is an inherent part of their care."All adults with congenital heart disease should have at least one appointment at a specialist centre to determine how often they need to be seen. Teams at these centres should include specialist nurses, psychologists and social workers given that anxiety and depression are common concerns.Pregnancy is contraindicated in women with certain conditions such high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs. "Pre-conception counselling is recommended for women and men to discuss the risk of the defect in offspring and the option of foetal screening," said Professor Julie De Backer, Chairperson of the guidelines Task Force and cardiologist and clinical geneticist at Ghent University Hospital, Belgium.Concerning sports, recommendations are provided for each condition.

Professor De Backer said. "All adults with congenital heart disease should be encouraged to exercise, taking into account the nature of the underlying defect and their own abilities."The guidelines state when and how to diagnose complications. This includes proactively monitoring for arrhythmias, cardiac imaging and blood tests to detect problems with heart function.Detailed recommendations are provided on how and when to treat complications.

Arrhythmias are an important cause of sickness and death and the guidelines stress the importance of correct and timely referral to a specialised treatment centre. They also list when particular treatments should be considered such as ablation (a procedure to destroy heart tissue and stop faulty electrical signals) and device implantation.For several defects, there are new recommendations for catheter-based treatment. "Catheter-based treatment should be performed by specialists in adult congenital heart disease working within a multidisciplinary team," said Professor Baumgartner.

Story Source. Materials provided by European Society of Cardiology. Note.

Content may be edited for style and length.One in five patients die within a year after the most common type of heart attack. European Society of Cardiology (ESC) treatment guidelines for non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome are published online today in European Heart Journal, and on the ESC website.Chest pain is the most common symptom, along with pain radiating to one or both arms, the neck, or jaw. Anyone experiencing these symptoms should call an ambulance immediately.

Complications include potentially deadly heart rhythm disorders (arrhythmias), which are another reason to seek urgent medical help.Treatment is aimed at the underlying cause. The main reason is fatty deposits (atherosclerosis) that become surrounded by a blood clot, narrowing the arteries supplying blood to the heart. In these cases, patients should receive blood thinners and stents to restore blood flow.

For the first time, the guidelines recommend imaging to identify other causes such as a tear in a blood vessel leading to the heart.Regarding diagnosis, there is no distinguishing change on the electrocardiogram (ECG), which may be normal. The key step is measuring a chemical in the blood called troponin. When blood flow to the heart is decreased or blocked, heart cells die, and troponin levels rise.

If levels are normal, the measurement should be repeated one hour later to rule out the diagnosis. If elevated, hospital admission is recommended to further evaluate the severity of the disease and decide the treatment strategy.Given that the main cause is related to atherosclerosis, there is a high risk of recurrence, which can also be deadly. Patients should be prescribed blood thinners and lipid lowering therapies.

"Equally important is a healthy lifestyle including smoking cessation, exercise, and a diet emphasising vegetables, fruits and whole grains while limiting saturated fat and alcohol," said Professor Jean-Philippe Collet, Chairperson of the guidelines Task Force and professor of cardiology, Sorbonne University, Paris, France.Behavioural change and adherence to medication are best achieved when patients are supported by a multidisciplinary team including cardiologists, general practitioners, nurses, dietitians, physiotherapists, psychologists, and pharmacists.The likelihood of triggering another heart attack during sexual activity is low for most patients, and regular exercise decreases this risk. Healthcare providers should ask patients about sexual activity and offer advice and counselling.Annual influenza vaccination is recommended -- especially for patients aged 65 and over -- to prevent further heart attacks and increase longevity."Women should receive equal access to care, a prompt diagnosis, and treatments at the same rate and intensity as men," said Professor Holger Thiele, Chairperson of the guidelines Task Force and medical director, Department of Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Heart Centre Leipzig, Germany. Story Source.

Materials provided by European Society of Cardiology. Note. Content may be edited for style and length.Feeling angry these days?.

New research suggests that a good night of sleep may be just what you need.This program of research comprised an analysis of diaries and lab experiments. The researchers analyzed daily diary entries from 202 college students, who tracked their sleep, daily stressors, and anger over one month. Preliminary results show that individuals reported experiencing more anger on days following less sleep than usual for them.The research team also conducted a lab experiment involving 147 community residents.

Participants were randomly assigned either to maintain their regular sleep schedule or to restrict their sleep at home by about five hours across two nights. Following this manipulation, anger was assessed during exposure to irritating noise.The experiment found that well-slept individuals adapted to noise and reported less anger after two days. In contrast, sleep-restricted individuals exhibited higher and increased anger in response to aversive noise, suggesting that losing sleep undermined emotional adaptation to frustrating circumstance.

Subjective sleepiness accounted for most of the experimental effect of sleep loss on anger. A related experiment in which individuals reported anger following an online competitive game found similar results."The results are important because they provide strong causal evidence that sleep restriction increases anger and increases frustration over time," said Zlatan Krizan, who has a doctorate in personality and social psychology and is a professor of psychology at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. "Moreover, the results from the daily diary study suggest such effects translate to everyday life, as young adults reported more anger in the afternoon on days they slept less."The authors noted that the findings highlight the importance of considering specific emotional reactions such as anger and their regulation in the context of sleep disruption.

Story Source. Materials provided by American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Note.

Content may be edited for style and length.Overcoming the nation's opioid epidemic will require clinicians to look beyond opioids, new research from Oregon Health &. Science University suggests.The study reveals that among patients who participated in an in-hospital addiction medicine intervention at OHSU, three-quarters came into the hospital using more than one substance. Overall, participants used fewer substances in the months after working with the hospital-based addictions team than before.The study published in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment."We found that polysubstance use is the norm," said lead author Caroline King, M.P.H., a health systems researcher and current M.D./Ph.D.

Student in the OHSU School of Medicine's biomedical engineering program. "This is important because we may need to offer additional support to patients using multiple drugs. If someone with opioid use disorder also uses alcohol or methamphetamines, we miss caring for the whole person by focusing only on their opioid use."About 40% of participants reported they had abstained from using at least one substance at least a month after discharge -- a measure of success that isn't typically tracked in health system record-keeping.Researchers enrolled 486 people seen by an addiction medicine consult service while hospitalized at OHSU Hospital between 2015 and 2018, surveying them early during their stay in the hospital and then again 30 to 90 days after discharge.

advertisement Treatment of opioid use disorder can involve medication such as buprenorphine, or Suboxone, which normalizes brain function by acting on the same target in the brain as prescription opioids or heroin.However, focusing only on the opioid addiction may not adequately address the complexity of each patient."Methamphetamine use in many parts of the U.S., including Oregon, is prominent right now," said senior author Honora Englander, M.D., associate professor of medicine (hospital medicine) in the OHSU School of Medicine. "If people are using stimulants and opioids -- and we only talk about their opioid use -- there are independent harms from stimulant use combined with opioids. People may be using methamphetamines for different reasons than they use opioids."Englander leads the in-hospital addiction service, known as Project IMPACT, or Improving Addiction Care Team.The initiative brings together physicians, social workers, peer-recovery mentors and community addiction providers to address addiction when patients are admitted to the hospital.

Since its inception in 2015, the program has served more than 1,950 people hospitalized at OHSU.The national opioid epidemic spiraled out of control following widespread prescribing of powerful pain medications beginning in the 1990s. Since then, it has often been viewed as a public health crisis afflicting rural, suburban and affluent communities that are largely white.Englander said the new study suggests that a singular focus on opioids may cause clinicians to overlook complexity of issues facing many populations, including people of color, who may also use other substances."Centering on opioids centers on whiteness," Englander said. "Understanding the complexity of people's substance use patterns is really important to honoring their experience and developing systems that support their needs."Researchers say the finding further reinforces earlier research showing that hospitalization is an important time to offer treatment to people with substance use disorder, even if they are not seeking treatment for addiction when they come to the hospital.

Story Source. Materials provided by Oregon Health &. Science University.

Original written by Erik Robinson. Note. Content may be edited for style and length.Researchers from the University of Minnesota, with support from Medtronic, have developed a groundbreaking process for multi-material 3D printing of lifelike models of the heart's aortic valve and the surrounding structures that mimic the exact look and feel of a real patient.These patient-specific organ models, which include 3D-printed soft sensor arrays integrated into the structure, are fabricated using specialized inks and a customized 3D printing process.

Such models can be used in preparation for minimally invasive procedures to improve outcomes in thousands of patients worldwide.The research is published in Science Advances, a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).The researchers 3D printed what is called the aortic root, the section of the aorta closest to and attached to the heart. The aortic root consists of the aortic valve and the openings for the coronary arteries. The aortic valve has three flaps, called leaflets, surrounded by a fibrous ring.

The model also included part of the left ventricle muscle and the ascending aorta."Our goal with these 3D-printed models is to reduce medical risks and complications by providing patient-specific tools to help doctors understand the exact anatomical structure and mechanical properties of the specific patient's heart," said Michael McAlpine, a University of Minnesota mechanical engineering professor and senior researcher on the study. "Physicians can test and try the valve implants before the actual procedure. The models can also help patients better understand their own anatomy and the procedure itself."This organ model was specifically designed to help doctors prepare for a procedure called a Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) in which a new valve is placed inside the patient's native aortic valve.

The procedure is used to treat a condition called aortic stenosis that occurs when the heart's aortic valve narrows and prevents the valve from opening fully, which reduces or blocks blood flow from the heart into the main artery. Aortic stenosis is one of the most common cardiovascular conditions in the elderly and affects about 2.7 million adults over the age of 75 in North America. The TAVR procedure is less invasive than open heart surgery to repair the damaged valve.

advertisement The aortic root models are made by using CT scans of the patient to match the exact shape. They are then 3D printed using specialized silicone-based inks that mechanically match the feel of real heart tissue the researchers obtained from the University of Minnesota's Visible Heart Laboratories. Commercial printers currently on the market can 3D print the shape, but use inks that are often too rigid to match the softness of real heart tissue.On the flip side, the specialized 3D printers at the University of Minnesota were able to mimic both the soft tissue components of the model, as well as the hard calcification on the valve flaps by printing an ink similar to spackling paste used in construction to repair drywall and plaster.Physicians can use the models to determine the size and placement of the valve device during the procedure.

Integrated sensors that are 3D printed within the model give physicians the electronic pressure feedback that can be used to guide and optimize the selection and positioning of the valve within the patient's anatomy.But McAlpine doesn't see this as the end of the road for these 3D-printed models."As our 3D-printing techniques continue to improve and we discover new ways to integrate electronics to mimic organ function, the models themselves may be used as artificial replacement organs," said McAlpine, who holds the Kuhrmeyer Family Chair Professorship in the University of Minnesota Department of Mechanical Engineering. "Someday maybe these 'bionic' organs can be as good as or better than their biological counterparts."In addition to McAlpine, the team included University of Minnesota researchers Ghazaleh Haghiashtiani, co-first author and a recent mechanical engineering Ph.D. Graduate who now works at Seagate.

Kaiyan Qiu, another co-first author and a former mechanical engineering postdoctoral researcher who is now an assistant professor at Washington State University. Jorge D. Zhingre Sanchez, a former biomedical engineering Ph.D.

Student who worked in the University of Minnesota's Visible Heart Laboratories who is now a senior R&D engineer at Medtronic. Zachary J. Fuenning, a mechanical engineering graduate student.

Paul A. Iaizzo, a professor of surgery in the Medical School and founding director of the U of M Visible Heart Laboratories. Priya Nair, senior scientist at Medtronic.

And Sarah E. Ahlberg, director of research &. Technology at Medtronic.This research was funded by Medtronic, the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the National Institutes of Health, and the Minnesota Discovery, Research, and InnoVation Economy (MnDRIVE) Initiative through the State of Minnesota.

Additional support was provided by University of Minnesota Interdisciplinary Doctoral Fellowship and Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship awarded to Ghazaleh Haghiashtiani..

Aug have a peek at this web-site how to buy cheap viagra. 29, 2020 -- Chadwick Boseman, the star of the 2018 Marvel Studios megahit Black Panther, died of colon cancer Friday. He was 43 how to buy cheap viagra.

Boseman, who was diagnosed 4 years ago, had kept his condition a secret. He filmed his recent movies ''during how to buy cheap viagra and between countless surgeries and chemotherapy," according to a statement issued on his Twitter account. When the actor was diagnosed in 2016, the cancer was at stage III -- meaning it had already grown through the colon wall -- but then progressed to the more lethal stage IV, meaning it had spread beyond his colon.

Messages of condolences and the hashtag #Wakandaforever, referring to the fictional African nation in the Black Panther film, flooded social media Friday evening. Oprah tweeted how to buy cheap viagra. "What a gentle gifted SOUL.

Showing us all how to buy cheap viagra that Greatness in between surgeries and chemo. The courage, the strength, the Power it takes to do that. This is what Dignity looks like.

" Marvel how to buy cheap viagra Studios tweeted. "Your legacy will live on forever." Boseman was also known for his role as Jackie Robinson in the movie 42. Coincidentally, Friday was Major League Baseball's how to buy cheap viagra Jackie Robinson Day, where every player on every team wears Robinson's number 42 on their jerseys.

Boseman's other starring roles include portraying James Brown in Get on Up and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall in how to buy cheap viagra Marshall. But his role as King T'Challa in Black Panther, the super hero protagonist, made him an icon and an inspiration.

About Colon Cancer Boseman's death reflects a troubling recent trend, says Mark Hanna, MD, a colorectal surgeon at City of Hope, a comprehensive cancer center near Los Angeles. "We have noticed an increasing incidence of colorectal cancer in young adults," how to buy cheap viagra says Hanna, who did not treat Boseman. "I've seen patients as young as their early 20s." About 104,000 cases of colon cancer will be diagnosed this year, according to American Cancer Society estimates, and another 43,000 cases of rectal cancer will be diagnosed.

About 12% of how to buy cheap viagra those, or 18,000 cases, will be in people under age 50. As the rates have declined in older adults due to screening, rates in young adults have steadily risen. Younger patients are often diagnosed at a later stage than older adults, Hanna says, because patients and even their doctors don't think about the possibility of colon cancer.

Because it is how to buy cheap viagra considered a cancer affecting older adults, many younger people may brush off the symptoms or delay getting medical attention, Hanna says. In a survey of 885 colorectal cancer patients conducted by Colorectal Cancer Alliance earlier this year, 75% said they visited two or more doctors before getting their diagnosis, and 11% went to 10 or more before finding out. If found early, colon how to buy cheap viagra cancer is curable, Hanna says.

About 50% of those with colon cancer will be diagnosed at stage I or II, which is considered localized disease, he says. "The majority have a how to buy cheap viagra very good prognosis." The 5-year survival rate is about 90% for both stage I and II. But when it progresses to stage III, the cancer has begun to grow into surrounding tissues and the lymph nodes, Hanna says, and the survival rate for 5 years drops to 75%.

About 25% of patients are diagnosed at stage III, he says. If the diagnosis is made at stage IV, how to buy cheap viagra the 5-year survival rate drops to about 10% or 15%, he says. Experts have been trying to figure out why more young adults are getting colon cancer and why some do so poorly.

"Traditionally we thought that patients how to buy cheap viagra who are older would have a worse outlook," Hanna says, partly because they tend to have other medical conditions too. Some experts say that younger patients might have more ''genetically aggressive disease," Hanna says. "Our understanding of colorectal cancer is becoming more nuanced, and we know that not all forms are the same." For instance, he says, testing is done for specific genetic mutations that have been tied to colon cancer.

"It's not just about finding the mutations, but finding the drug that targets [that form] best." Paying Attention to Red Flags how to buy cheap viagra "If you have any of what we call the red flag signs, do not ignore your symptoms no matter what your age is," Hanna says. Those are. In 2018, the American Cancer Society changed its guidelines for screening, recommending those at average risk start at age 45, not 50 how to buy cheap viagra.

The screening can be stool-based testing, such as a fecal occult blood test, or visual, such as a colonoscopy. Hanna says he orders a colonoscopy if the symptoms suggest colon cancer, regardless of a patient's age. Family history of colorectal cancer is how to buy cheap viagra a risk factor, as are being obese or overweight, being sedentary, and eating lots of red meat.

Sources Mark Hanna, MD, colorectal surgeon and assistant clinical professor of surgery, City of Hope, Los Angeles. American how to buy cheap viagra Cancer Society. "Key Statistics for Colorectal Cancer." Twitter statement.

Chadwick Boseman how to buy cheap viagra. American Cancer Society. "Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors." American Cancer Society.

'"Colorectal Cancer Rates Rise in Younger Adults." American Society of Clinical Oncology how to buy cheap viagra annual meeting, May 29-31, 2020. American Cancer Society "Survival Rates for Colorectal Cancer." American Cancer Society. "Colorectal Cancer Facts & how to buy cheap viagra.

Figures. 2017-2019." © 2020 WebMD, LLC. All rights how to buy cheap viagra reserved.FRIDAY, Aug.

28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- As many as 20% of Americans don't believe in treatments, a new study finds. Misinformed how to buy cheap viagra treatment beliefs drive opposition to public treatment policies even more than politics, education, religion or other factors, researchers say. The findings are based on a survey of nearly 2,000 U.S.

Adults done in 2019, during the largest measles outbreak in 25 how to buy cheap viagra years. The researchers, from the Annenberg Public Policy Center (APPC) of the University of Pennsylvania, found that negative misperceptions about vaccinations. reduced the likelihood of supporting mandatory childhood treatments by 70%, reduced the likelihood of opposing religious exemptions by 66%, reduced the likelihood of opposing personal belief exemptions by 79%.

"There are real implications here for a treatment for erectile dysfunction treatment," how to buy cheap viagra lead author Dominik Stecula said in an APPC news release. He conducted the research while at APPC and is now an assistant professor of political science at Colorado State University. "The negative treatment beliefs we examined aren't limited only to the measles, mumps and rubella [MMR] treatment, but how to buy cheap viagra are general attitudes about vaccination." Stecula called for an education campaign by public health professionals and journalists, among others, to preemptively correct misinformation and prepare the public to accept a erectile dysfunction treatment.

Overall, there was strong support for vaccination policies. 72% strongly or somewhat supported mandatory childhood vaccination, 60% strongly or somewhat opposed religious exemptions, 66% strongly or somewhat opposed treatment exemptions based on personal beliefs. "On how to buy cheap viagra the one hand, these are big majorities.

Well above 50% of Americans support mandatory childhood vaccinations and oppose religious and personal belief exemptions to vaccination," said co-author Ozan Kuru, a former APPC researcher, now an assistant professor of communications at the National University of Singapore. "Still, how to buy cheap viagra we need a stronger consensus in the public to bolster pro-treatment attitudes and legislation and thus achieve community immunity," he added in the release. A previous study from the 2018-2019 measles outbreak found that people who rely on social media were more likely to be misinformed about treatments.

And a more recent one found that people how to buy cheap viagra who got information from social media or conservative news outlets at the start of the erectile dysfunction treatment viagra were more likely to be misinformed about how to prevent and hold conspiracy theories about it. With the erectile dysfunction viagra still raging, the number of Americans needed to be vaccinated to achieve community-wide immunity is not known, the researchers said. The findings were recently published online in the American Journal of Public Health.By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Aug.

28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding mothers are unlikely to transmit the how to buy cheap viagra new erectile dysfunction to their babies via their milk, researchers say. No cases of an infant contracting erectile dysfunction treatment from breast milk have been documented, but questions about the potential risk remain. Researchers examined 64 samples of breast milk collected how to buy cheap viagra from 18 women across the United States who were infected with the new erectile dysfunction (erectile dysfunction) that causes erectile dysfunction treatment.

One sample tested positive for erectile dysfunction RNA, but follow-up tests showed that the viagra couldn't replicate and therefore, couldn't infect the breastfed infant, according to the study recently published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association. "Detection of viral RNA does not equate to . It has to grow and multiply in order to be infectious and we did not find that how to buy cheap viagra in any of our samples," said study author Christina Chambers, a professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Diego.

She is also director of the Mommy's Milk Human Milk Research Biorepository. "Our findings how to buy cheap viagra suggest breast milk itself is not likely a source of for the infant," Chambers said in a UCSD news release. To prevent transmission of the viagra while breastfeeding, wearing a mask, hand-washing and sterilizing pumping equipment after each use are recommended.

"We hope our results and future studies will give women the reassurance needed how to buy cheap viagra for them to breastfeed. Human milk provides invaluable benefits to mom and baby," said co-author Dr. Grace Aldrovandi, chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital in Los Angeles.

WebMD News how to buy cheap viagra from HealthDay Sources SOURCE. University of California, San Diego, news release, Aug. 19, 2020 how to buy cheap viagra Copyright © 2013-2020 HealthDay.

All rights reserved.Nursing home staff will have to be tested regularly for erectile dysfunction treatment, and facilities that fail to do so will face fines, the Trump administration said Tuesday. Even though they account for less than 1% of the nation's population, long-term care facilities account for 42% of erectile dysfunction treatment deaths in the United States, the Associated Press reported. There have how to buy cheap viagra been more than 70,000 deaths in U.S.

Nursing homes, according to the erectile dysfunction treatment Tracking Project. It's been how to buy cheap viagra months since the White House first urged governors to test all nursing home residents and staff, the AP reported. WebMD News from HealthDay Copyright © 2013-2020 HealthDay.

All rights reserved.August 28, 2020 -- Alcohol-based hand sanitizers that are packaged in containers that look like food items or drinks could cause injury or death if ingested, according to a new warning the FDA issued Thursday. Hand sanitizers are how to buy cheap viagra being packaged in beer cans, water bottles, juice bottles, vodka bottles and children’s food pouches, the FDA said. Some sanitizers also contain flavors, such as chocolate or raspberry, which could cause confusion.

€œI am increasingly concerned about hand sanitizer being packaged to appear to be consumable products, such as baby food how to buy cheap viagra or beverages,” Stephen Hahn, MD, the FDA commissioner, said in a statement. Accidentally drinking hand sanitizer — even a small amount — is potentially lethal to children. €œThese products how to buy cheap viagra could confuse consumers into accidentally ingesting a potentially deadly product,” he said.

€œIt’s dangerous to add scents with food flavors to hand sanitizers which children could think smells like food, eat and get alcohol poisoning.” For example, the FDA received a report about a consumer who purchased a bottle that looked like drinkable water but was actually hand sanitizer. In another report, a retailer informed the agency about a hand sanitizer product that was marketed in a pouch that looks like a children’s snack and had cartoons on it. Meanwhile, the FDA's warning list about dangerous hand sanitizers containing methanol continues to how to buy cheap viagra grow as some people are drinking the sanitizers to get an alcohol high.

Others have believed a rumor, circulated online, that drinking the highly potent and toxic alcohol can http://colleenhumphries.com/are-you-aware-of-self-esteem-leeches/ disinfect the body, protecting them from erectile dysfunction treatment . Earlier this month, the FDA also issued a warning about hand sanitizers contaminated with 1-propanol how to buy cheap viagra. Ingesting 1-propanol can cause central nervous system depression, which can be fatal, the agency says.

Symptoms of 1-propanol exposure can include confusion, decreased consciousness, and slowed pulse and breathing. One brand of sanitizer, Harmonic Nature S de RL de how to buy cheap viagra MI of Mexico, are labeled to contain ethanol or isopropyl alcohol but have tested positive for 1-propanol contamination. Poison control centers and state health departments have reported an increasing number of adverse events associated with hand sanitizer ingestion, including heart issues, nervous system problems, hospitalizations and deaths, according to the statement.

The FDA encouraged consumers and how to buy cheap viagra health care professionals to report issues to the MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program. The agency is working with manufacturers to recall confusing and dangerous products and is encouraging retailers to remove some products from shelves. The FDA is also updating how to buy cheap viagra its list of hand sanitizer products that consumers should avoid.

€œManufacturers should be vigilant about packaging and marketing their hand sanitizers in food or drink packages in an effort to mitigate any potential inadvertent use by consumers,” Hahn said.More than 90% of babies born with heart defects survive into adulthood. As a result, there are now more adults living with congenital heart disease than children. These adults have a chronic, lifelong condition and the European Society how to buy cheap viagra of Cardiology (ESC) has produced advice to give the best chance of a normal life.

The guidelines are published online today in European Heart Journal,1 and on the ESC website.2Congenital heart disease refers to any structural defect of the heart and/or great vessels (those directly connected to the heart) present at birth. Congenital heart disease how to buy cheap viagra affects all aspects of life, including physical and mental health, socialising, and work. Most patients are unable to exercise at the same level as their peers which, along with the awareness of having a chronic condition, affects mental wellbeing."Having a congenital heart disease, with a need for long-term follow-up and treatment, can also have an impact on social life, limit employment options and make it difficult to get insurance," said Professor Helmut Baumgartner, Chairperson of the guidelines Task Force and head of Adult Congenital and Valvular Heart Disease at the University Hospital of Münster, Germany.

"Guiding and supporting patients in all of these processes is an inherent part of their care."All adults with congenital heart disease should have at least one appointment at a specialist centre to determine how often they need to be seen. Teams at these centres should include specialist nurses, psychologists and social workers given that anxiety and depression are common concerns.Pregnancy is contraindicated in women how to buy cheap viagra with certain conditions such high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs. "Pre-conception counselling is recommended for women and men to discuss the risk of the defect in offspring and the option of foetal screening," said Professor Julie De Backer, Chairperson of the guidelines Task Force and cardiologist and clinical geneticist at Ghent University Hospital, Belgium.Concerning sports, recommendations are provided for each condition.

Professor De Backer how to buy cheap viagra said. "All adults with congenital heart disease should be encouraged to exercise, taking into account the nature of the underlying defect and their own abilities."The guidelines state when and how to diagnose complications. This includes proactively monitoring for arrhythmias, cardiac imaging and blood tests to detect problems with heart how to buy cheap viagra function.Detailed recommendations are provided on how and when to treat complications.

Arrhythmias are an important cause of sickness and death and the guidelines stress the importance of correct and timely referral to a specialised treatment centre. They also list when particular treatments should be considered such as ablation (a procedure to destroy heart tissue and stop faulty electrical signals) and device implantation.For several defects, there are new recommendations for catheter-based treatment. "Catheter-based treatment should be performed by specialists in adult congenital heart disease working within a multidisciplinary team," said Professor Baumgartner how to buy cheap viagra.

Story Source. Materials provided how to buy cheap viagra by European Society of Cardiology. Note.

Content may be edited for style and length.One in five patients die within a year after the most common type of heart attack. European Society of Cardiology (ESC) treatment guidelines for non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome are published online today in European Heart Journal, and on the ESC website.Chest pain is the most common symptom, along with pain radiating to one or how to buy cheap viagra both arms, the neck, or jaw. Anyone experiencing these symptoms should call an ambulance immediately.

Complications include potentially deadly heart rhythm disorders (arrhythmias), which are another reason to seek how to buy cheap viagra urgent medical help.Treatment is aimed at the underlying cause. The main reason is fatty deposits (atherosclerosis) that become surrounded by a blood clot, narrowing the arteries supplying blood to the heart. In these cases, patients should receive blood thinners and stents to restore blood flow.

For the first time, the guidelines recommend imaging to identify other causes such as a tear in a blood vessel leading to the heart.Regarding diagnosis, there is no distinguishing change on the electrocardiogram (ECG), which may be normal how to buy cheap viagra. The key step is measuring a chemical in the blood called troponin. When blood flow to the how to buy cheap viagra heart is decreased or blocked, heart cells die, and troponin levels rise.

If levels are normal, the measurement should be repeated one hour later to rule out the diagnosis. If elevated, hospital admission is recommended to further evaluate the severity of the disease and decide the treatment strategy.Given that the main cause is related to how to buy cheap viagra atherosclerosis, there is a high risk of recurrence, which can also be deadly. Patients should be prescribed blood thinners and lipid lowering therapies.

"Equally important is a healthy lifestyle including smoking cessation, exercise, and a diet emphasising vegetables, fruits and whole grains while limiting saturated fat and alcohol," said Professor Jean-Philippe Collet, Chairperson of the guidelines Task Force and professor of cardiology, Sorbonne University, Paris, France.Behavioural change and adherence to medication are best achieved when patients are supported by a multidisciplinary team including cardiologists, general practitioners, nurses, dietitians, physiotherapists, psychologists, and pharmacists.The likelihood of triggering another heart attack during sexual activity is low for most patients, and regular exercise decreases this risk. Healthcare providers should ask patients about sexual activity and offer advice and counselling.Annual influenza vaccination is recommended -- especially for patients aged 65 and over -- to prevent further heart attacks and increase longevity."Women should how to buy cheap viagra receive equal access to care, a prompt diagnosis, and treatments at the same rate and intensity as men," said Professor Holger Thiele, Chairperson of the guidelines Task Force and medical director, Department of Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Heart Centre Leipzig, Germany. Story Source.

Materials provided by how to buy cheap viagra European Society of Cardiology. Note. Content may be edited for style and length.Feeling angry these days?.

New research suggests that a good night of sleep may how to buy cheap viagra be just what you need.This program of research comprised an analysis of diaries and lab experiments. The researchers analyzed daily diary entries from 202 college students, who tracked their sleep, daily stressors, and anger over one month. Preliminary results show that individuals reported experiencing more anger on days following less sleep than usual for them.The research team also conducted a lab experiment how to buy cheap viagra involving 147 community residents.

Participants were randomly assigned either to maintain their regular sleep schedule or to restrict their sleep at home by about five hours across two nights. Following this manipulation, anger was assessed during exposure to irritating how to buy cheap viagra noise.The experiment found that well-slept individuals adapted to noise and reported less anger after two days. In contrast, sleep-restricted individuals exhibited higher and increased anger in response to aversive noise, suggesting that losing sleep undermined emotional adaptation to frustrating circumstance.

Subjective sleepiness accounted for most of the experimental effect of sleep loss on anger. A related experiment in which individuals reported anger following an online competitive game found similar results."The results are important because they provide strong causal evidence that sleep restriction increases anger and increases frustration over time," how to buy cheap viagra said Zlatan Krizan, who has a doctorate in personality and social psychology and is a professor of psychology at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. "Moreover, the results from the daily diary study suggest such effects translate to everyday life, as young adults reported more anger in the afternoon on days they slept less."The authors noted that the findings highlight the importance of considering specific emotional reactions such as anger and their regulation in the context of sleep disruption.

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Content may be edited for style and length.Overcoming the nation's opioid epidemic will require clinicians to look beyond opioids, new how to buy cheap viagra research from Oregon Health &. Science University suggests.The study reveals that among patients who participated in an in-hospital addiction medicine intervention at OHSU, three-quarters came into the hospital using more than one substance. Overall, participants used fewer substances in the months after working with the hospital-based addictions team than before.The study published in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment."We found that polysubstance use is the norm," said lead author Caroline King, how to buy cheap viagra M.P.H., a health systems researcher and current M.D./Ph.D.

Student in the OHSU School of Medicine's biomedical engineering program. "This is important because we may need to offer additional how to buy cheap viagra support to patients using multiple drugs. If someone with opioid use disorder also uses alcohol or methamphetamines, we miss caring for the whole person by focusing only on their opioid use."About 40% of participants reported they had abstained from using at least one substance at least a month after discharge -- a measure of success that isn't typically tracked in health system record-keeping.Researchers enrolled 486 people seen by an addiction medicine consult service while hospitalized at OHSU Hospital between 2015 and 2018, surveying them early during their stay in the hospital and then again 30 to 90 days after discharge.

advertisement Treatment of opioid use disorder can involve medication such as buprenorphine, or Suboxone, which normalizes brain function by acting on the same target in the brain as prescription opioids or heroin.However, focusing only on the opioid addiction may not adequately address the complexity of each patient."Methamphetamine use in many parts of the U.S., including Oregon, is prominent right now," said senior author Honora Englander, M.D., associate professor of medicine (hospital medicine) in the OHSU School of Medicine. "If people are using stimulants and opioids -- and we only talk about their opioid use -- there are independent harms from stimulant how to buy cheap viagra use combined with opioids. People may be using methamphetamines for different reasons than they use opioids."Englander leads the in-hospital addiction service, known as Project IMPACT, or Improving Addiction Care Team.The initiative brings together physicians, social workers, peer-recovery mentors and community addiction providers to address addiction when patients are admitted to the hospital.

Since its inception in 2015, the program has served more than 1,950 people hospitalized at OHSU.The national opioid epidemic spiraled out of control following widespread prescribing of powerful pain medications beginning in the how to buy cheap viagra 1990s. Since then, it has often been viewed as a public health crisis afflicting rural, suburban and affluent communities that are largely white.Englander said the new study suggests that a singular focus on opioids may cause clinicians to overlook complexity of issues facing many populations, including people of color, who may also use other substances."Centering on opioids centers on whiteness," Englander said. "Understanding the complexity of people's substance use patterns is really important to honoring their experience and developing systems that support their needs."Researchers say the finding further reinforces earlier research showing that hospitalization is an important time to offer treatment to people with substance use disorder, even if they are not seeking treatment for addiction when they come to the hospital.

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Original written by Erik Robinson. Note. Content may be edited for style and length.Researchers from the University of Minnesota, with support from Medtronic, have developed a groundbreaking process for multi-material 3D printing of lifelike models of the heart's how to buy cheap viagra aortic valve and the surrounding structures that mimic the exact look and feel of a real patient.These patient-specific organ models, which include 3D-printed soft sensor arrays integrated into the structure, are fabricated using specialized inks and a customized 3D printing process.

Such models can be used in preparation for minimally invasive procedures to improve outcomes in thousands of patients worldwide.The research is published in Science Advances, a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).The researchers 3D printed what is called the aortic root, the section of the aorta closest to and attached to the heart. The aortic root how to buy cheap viagra consists of the aortic valve and the openings for the coronary arteries. The aortic valve has three flaps, called leaflets, surrounded by a fibrous ring.

The model also included part of the left ventricle muscle and the ascending aorta."Our goal with these 3D-printed how to buy cheap viagra models is to reduce medical risks and complications by providing patient-specific tools to help doctors understand the exact anatomical structure and mechanical properties of the specific patient's heart," said Michael McAlpine, a University of Minnesota mechanical engineering professor and senior researcher on the study. "Physicians can test and try the valve implants before the actual procedure. The models can also help patients better understand their own anatomy and the procedure itself."This organ model was specifically designed to help doctors prepare for a procedure called a Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) in which a new valve is placed inside the patient's native aortic valve.

The procedure is used to treat a condition called aortic stenosis that occurs when the heart's aortic valve narrows and prevents the valve from opening fully, which how to buy cheap viagra reduces or blocks blood flow from the heart into the main artery. Aortic stenosis is one of the most common cardiovascular conditions in the elderly and affects about 2.7 million adults over the age of 75 in North America. The TAVR procedure is less invasive than how to buy cheap viagra open heart surgery to repair the damaged valve.

advertisement The aortic root models are made by using CT scans of the patient to match the exact shape. They are then 3D printed using specialized silicone-based inks that mechanically match the feel of real heart tissue the researchers obtained from the University of Minnesota's Visible Heart Laboratories. Commercial printers currently on the market can 3D print the shape, but use inks that are often too rigid to match the softness of real heart tissue.On the flip side, the specialized 3D printers at the University of Minnesota were able to mimic both the soft tissue components of the model, as well as the hard calcification on the valve flaps by printing an ink how to buy cheap viagra similar to spackling paste used in construction to repair drywall and plaster.Physicians can use the models to determine the size and placement of the valve device during the procedure.

Integrated sensors that are 3D printed within the model give physicians the electronic pressure feedback that can be used to guide and optimize the selection and positioning of the valve within the patient's anatomy.But McAlpine doesn't see this as the end of the road for these 3D-printed models."As our 3D-printing techniques continue to improve and we discover new ways to integrate electronics to mimic organ function, the models themselves may be used as artificial replacement organs," said McAlpine, who holds the Kuhrmeyer Family Chair Professorship in the University of Minnesota Department of Mechanical Engineering. "Someday maybe these 'bionic' organs can be as good as or better than their biological counterparts."In addition to McAlpine, the team included University of Minnesota researchers Ghazaleh Haghiashtiani, co-first author and how to buy cheap viagra a recent mechanical engineering Ph.D. Graduate who now works at Seagate.

Kaiyan Qiu, how to buy cheap viagra another co-first author and a former mechanical engineering postdoctoral researcher who is now an assistant professor at Washington State University. Jorge D. Zhingre Sanchez, a former biomedical engineering Ph.D.

Student who worked in the University how to buy cheap viagra of Minnesota's Visible Heart Laboratories who is now a senior R&D engineer at Medtronic. Zachary J. Fuenning, a mechanical how to buy cheap viagra engineering graduate student.

Paul A. Iaizzo, a professor of surgery in the Medical School and founding director of the U of M Visible Heart Laboratories. Priya Nair, senior scientist at Medtronic.

And Sarah E. Ahlberg, director of research &. Technology at Medtronic.This research was funded by Medtronic, the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the National Institutes of Health, and the Minnesota Discovery, Research, and InnoVation Economy (MnDRIVE) Initiative through the State of Minnesota.

Additional support was provided by University of Minnesota Interdisciplinary Doctoral Fellowship and Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship awarded to Ghazaleh Haghiashtiani..